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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Judith Scott-Clayton Testifies at Senate HELP Committee Hearing on College Affordability

Professor Scott-Clayton spoke at the Senate HELP committee's hearing on college affordability on June 3, and made recommendations to reduce complexity in the federal student aid application and loan repayment processes. Published: 6/4/2015 9:05:00 AM

Luis Huerta quoted in an Education Week article, May 29, 2015.

Prof. Huerta is quoted in an Education Week article "Charter Sector Challenged by Quality of School Boards," by Adrianna Prothero. Published: 6/1/2015 1:49:00 PM

Tom Bailey in the Washington Post: "Guided Pathways" Needed to Boost Community College Student Success

In a May 12, 2015 Washington Post Op-Ed, "Rethinking the 'Cafeteria' Approach to Community College," Professor Bailey argues that in order to substantially increase student completion, community colleges must engage in fundamental redesign. Published: 5/14/2015 4:01:00 PM

Aaron Pallas Discusses Teacher Evaluations at NYS Board of Regents Learning Summit

Aaron Pallas was one of seven researchers, economists, and professors who weighed in on the evaluation systems for teachers and principals at a Learning Summit hosted by the New York State Board of Regents and State Education Department on Thursday, May 7 at the New York State Museum. Published: 5/14/2015 3:55:00 PM

Mandy Shen is the Runner-Up for CCEE Prize

The Columbia Committee on the Economics of Education (CCEE) has announced that Mandy Shen, PhD student in Economics and Education, is the runner-up for this year's prize for the best research paper by a PhD student at Columbia for her paper, "Intergenerational effects of school desegregation." Published: 5/14/2015 3:28:00 PM

Sharon Lynn Kagan co-authors a report on early childhood education.

"A Better Start: Why Classroom Diversity Matters in Early Education." By Jeanne L. Reid, Sharon Lynn Kagan, Michael Hilton, Halley Potter. Published by The Century Foundation, April 3, 2015. Published: 5/7/2015 1:55:00 PM

Ryan Allen's podcast discussion with Kevin Dougherty and Rebecca Natow.

In this podcast, Ryan Allen interviews Prof. Kevin Dougherty, an Associate Professor of Higher Education and Education Policy, and Rebecca Natow, a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Community College Research Center. They discuss their book The Politics of Performance Funding for Higher Education: Origins, Discontinuations, and Transformations, published by Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015. Published: 5/7/2015

Travis Bristol, Ph.D. 2014 in Education Policy featured in the Washington Post article

Black Male Teachers: There aren't enough of them by Valerie Strauss, was published in the Washington Post on April 28 in the Answer Sheet section. Published: 4/29/2015 4:54:00 PM

Report by Professors Amy Stuart Wells and Doug Ready and EPSA Students and Alumnae Documents "Separate But Unequal" Suburban Schools

Sixty Years After the Brown Decision, Teachers College Study Finds
“Separate But Unequal” Schools Prevalent in Nassau County, Long Island

Report notes the trend in “hundreds of suburban counties across the country”

Sixty years after the historic  Brown vs. Board of Education  Supreme Court decision, schools and communities in suburban Nassau County, Long Island, are segregated by race and ethnicity, resulting in schools with mostly black and Latino students and fewer resources than majority-white schools, according to a new study released by Teachers College on May 2.

The report, Divided We Fall: The Story of Separate and Unequal Suburban Schools 60 Years after Brown v. Board of Education,  which is online here:  http://bit.ly/PXy3HQ, was discussed at an all-day symposium at Teachers College about the impact on today’s suburbs of the Brown decision.

The report was authored by EPSA's Amy Stuart Wells, Professor of Sociology and Education; Douglas Ready, Associate Professor of Education and Public Policy; students Lauren Fox, Tameka Spence, Elizabeth Williams and Allen Wright; and alumnae Allison Roda and Miya Warner.

Scheduled speakers at the symposium included experts on race, schools and housing from Teachers College, Harvard, Brown, Georgetown, Northwestern, the Universities of Wisconsin and Minnesota, as well as local education and government officials in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Xavier de Souza Briggs, vice president for economic opportunity and assets at the Ford Foundation, delivered opening remarks, and Jeanie Oakes, director of educational opportunity and scholarship programs at Ford, closed the proceedings.

An agenda for the symposium, including a schedule and biographies of speakers, is online here: http://bit.ly/1lHmQrg . A live webcast of the symposium may be accessed here:  http://bit.ly/1hkbKn8 for the duration of the event.

The report describes a “perfect storm” of economic and political factors—including budget constraints, increasingly burdensome accountability mandates, and mounting anti-public education sentiment among some stakeholders—which are taking a heavy toll on racially changing suburban schools and leading some to question whether or not the county’s network of small, racially homogeneous school districts are too inefficient to be sustained.

“The same story could be told about hundreds of suburban counties across the country that are facing similar pressures,” states the report.


(5/7/2014)

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