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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Rachel Langlais, an alumna of the LPP program in the TNTP blog, July 10, 2014

Rachel Langlais, an alumna of the Leadership, Policy and Politics program, 2012, currently works as a Senior Program Manager on the Partnerships and Research team at The New Teacher Project. Recently, Rachel, together with a co-writer, has published an entry on a TNTP blog titled "Embracing our own big data." Published: 7/28/2014 1:16:00 PM

Travis Bristol, Ph.D. in Education Policy, a guest in a Radio Boston Podcast. July 11, 2014

Dr. Travis Bristol, a 2014 graduate of the Education Policy program at Teachers College, is a guest in Radio Boston podcast "How to Increase the Number of Black Male Teachers in Boston Public Schools." He discusses the subject with Hayden Frederick-Clarke, a public school teacher in Charlestown. Travis Bristol is also a former high school English teacher in New York City public schools and teacher educator for secondary English with the Boston Teacher Residency program. After graduating from TC, he has received a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education. He tweets @TJacksonBristol. Published: 7/14/2014 2:36:00 PM

Michael Rebell, J.D. in the New York Daily News, July 7, 2014.

Michael Rebell, professor of law and educational practice at the EPSA department, reviews the decision of Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Rolf M. Treu to struck down the state's teacher tenure and seniority-order layoff laws. Published: 7/9/2014 3:16:00 PM

Judith Scott-Clayton Argues in NY Times for a Simpler Way to Apply for Financial Aid

After Senators cite their work, Judith Scott-Clayton and Susan Dynarski argue in the New York Times for simplifying the FAFSA form. Published: 6/23/2014 8:54:00 AM

Senators, Citing Scott-Clayton, Support Postcard FAFSA

Judith Scott-Clayton and Susan Dynarski argue for simplifying the FAFSA form. Published: 6/19/2014 12:13:00 PM

Aaron Pallas Quoted in Huffington Post

Pallas Urges Caution on NCTQ Teacher-Absence Report Published: 6/12/2014 2:49:00 PM

Ryan Allen's podcast discussion with Kevin Dougherty and Vikash Reddy.

Ryan Allen, an M.A. student in the Politics & Education Program at Teachers College has recently become a new host for the New Books in Education, a part of the New Books Network, which is a non-profit that offers podcasts in every academic field. New Books in Education show provides interviews with authors about their new publications related to the education field. In this podcast, Ryan interviews Prof. Kevin Dougherty, an Associate Professor of Higher Education and Education Policy, and Vikash Reddy, a Ph.D. candidate in Education Policy. They discuss their book Performance Funding for Higher Education; What are the Mechanisms What are the Impacts. The book was published in July 2013 at Jossey-Bass. Published: 6/3/2014 11:35:00 AM

Parent Involvement Not Overrated in Children's Success, writes Professor Bergman

Professor Peter Bergman co-authored an opinion piece for CNN debunking reports that parent involvement adds little to student achievement. Published: 5/21/2014 2:54:00 PM

Report by Professors Amy Stuart Wells and Doug Ready and EPSA Students and Alumnae Documents "Separate But Unequal" Suburban Schools

Sixty Years After the Brown Decision, Teachers College Study Finds
“Separate But Unequal” Schools Prevalent in Nassau County, Long Island

Report notes the trend in “hundreds of suburban counties across the country”

Sixty years after the historic  Brown vs. Board of Education  Supreme Court decision, schools and communities in suburban Nassau County, Long Island, are segregated by race and ethnicity, resulting in schools with mostly black and Latino students and fewer resources than majority-white schools, according to a new study released by Teachers College on May 2.

The report, Divided We Fall: The Story of Separate and Unequal Suburban Schools 60 Years after Brown v. Board of Education,  which is online here:  http://bit.ly/PXy3HQ, was discussed at an all-day symposium at Teachers College about the impact on today’s suburbs of the Brown decision.

The report was authored by EPSA's Amy Stuart Wells, Professor of Sociology and Education; Douglas Ready, Associate Professor of Education and Public Policy; students Lauren Fox, Tameka Spence, Elizabeth Williams and Allen Wright; and alumnae Allison Roda and Miya Warner.

Scheduled speakers at the symposium included experts on race, schools and housing from Teachers College, Harvard, Brown, Georgetown, Northwestern, the Universities of Wisconsin and Minnesota, as well as local education and government officials in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Xavier de Souza Briggs, vice president for economic opportunity and assets at the Ford Foundation, delivered opening remarks, and Jeanie Oakes, director of educational opportunity and scholarship programs at Ford, closed the proceedings.

An agenda for the symposium, including a schedule and biographies of speakers, is online here: http://bit.ly/1lHmQrg . A live webcast of the symposium may be accessed here:  http://bit.ly/1hkbKn8 for the duration of the event.

The report describes a “perfect storm” of economic and political factors—including budget constraints, increasingly burdensome accountability mandates, and mounting anti-public education sentiment among some stakeholders—which are taking a heavy toll on racially changing suburban schools and leading some to question whether or not the county’s network of small, racially homogeneous school districts are too inefficient to be sustained.

“The same story could be told about hundreds of suburban counties across the country that are facing similar pressures,” states the report.


(5/7/2014)

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