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Loss, Trauma, and Emotion Lab

George Bonanno, Ph.D., Teachers College, Columbia University
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  • People

    Current Lab Members

    • George A. Bonanno

      George A. Bonanno, Ph.D. is a Professor of Clinical Psychology. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1991. His research and scholarly interests have centered on the question of how human beings cope with loss, trauma and other forms of extreme adversity, with an emphasis on resilience and the salutary role of flexible coping and emotion regulatory processes. Professor Bonanno’s recent empirical and theoretical work has focused on defining and documenting adult resilience in the face of loss or potential traumatic events, and on identifying the range of psychological and contextual variables that predict both psychopathological and resilient outcomes. He was co-editor of Emotion: Current Issues and Future Directions (Guilford) and recently authored The Other Side of Sadness: What the New Science of Bereavement Tells us about Life After Loss (Basic Books). Email:  gab38@columbia.edu
    • Jeffrey Birk



      Jeffrey Birk
      is a Postdoctoral Researcher who received his Ph.D. from Tufts University in 2014. He researches the relationships among emotional states, cognitive performance, and well-being using a combination of physiological, behavioral, and self-reported measures. His doctoral research investigated the extent to which an attentional bias to threatening information and a deficit in attentional control contribute to state anxiety. He also studies how the ability to regulate emotion and the tendency to attend toward sad information predict depressive symptoms in people with and without a history of major depression. He is currently investigating how flexibility in emotion regulation promotes well-being over time. Email: birk@tc.columbia.edu

    • Meaghan Mobbs


      Meaghan Mobbs is a first-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program.  She received a B.S. in Comparative Politics from the United States Military Academy and a M.A. in Forensic Psychology from George Washington University.  A former Army CPT, her research interests include all aspects of the transition and social adjustment of soldiers from military service to civilian life and gender optimization in combat. Email: mm4713@tc.columbia.edu

    • Kan Long


      Kan Long is a first-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program. She received a B.A. in Psychology from Boston University and an M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She is trained in affective neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, and functional neuroimaging techniques. Her research interests include the mechanisms of emotion regulation and regulatory flexibility, as well as the role of individual difference variables in predicting outcome trajectories across the lifespan. ktl2115@tc.columbia.edu 
    • Katie McGreevy


      Katie McGreevy is a third-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Teachers College, Columbia University.  She received her B.A. in biology from Tufts University and her M.A. in psychology from The New School for Social Research.  Her research interests include the mechanisms of trauma-related memory and narrative, and the physiological bases of emotion regulation.
      cam2280@columbia.edu


    • Jed McGiffin

       Jed McGiffin is a third-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program.  He received his B.A. in Sociology from Brandeis University and did his M.A. work in Psychology at City College.  He has recently conducted research into the relationship between dissociation and cognitive processing in individuals exposed to traumatic events, and is more broadly interested in the processes surrounding psychosocial adjustment to disability and factors predicting resilient outcomes in the face of serious injury. He is currently working on a research study related to the experience people go through as patients in a hospital Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Email: jnm2150@columbia.edu
    • Matteo Malgaroli


      Matteo Malgaroli is a Third-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. He received his M.A. in Clinical Psychology with honors from Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, and his B.A. in Psychology from Università degli Studi Milano-Bicocca. Before joining the program, he worked in both academic and clinical research settings in Italy. His research interests include the application of supervised (e.g. SVM) and unsupervised (e.g. LGMM, undirected graphs) statistical learning to model mental disorders, using biological and neurocognitive factors to predict longitudinal functioning following potentially traumatic
      events, and the role of context in emotion flexibility. Email: mm4408@columbia.edu
    • Major Joe Geraci

      Lieutenant Colonel Joe Geraci is Director of Military Relations for the Teachers College Resilience Center for Veterans and Families and an advanced doctoral candidate in the Clinical Psychology Program. He is an Infantry officer in the U.S. Army. He received his B.S. in International Relations from the United States Military Academy. He received his M.A. (Social Organizational Psychology) and ED.M. (Mental Health Counseling)  from Teachers College, Columbia University. His research involves understanding and mitigating PTSD in military members and emergency service personnel. Lieutenant Colonel Geraci is currently heading up research examining the efficacy of the ProVetus program for veterans. Email: jcg2123@columbia.edu.
    • Philippa Connolly

      Philippa Connolly is a second-year doctoral student in clinical psychology. She received a B.Sc. in Film and Broadcasting from the Dublin Institute of Technology (2004), and a Higher Diploma in Psychology from University College Dublin, Ireland (2012). Most recently she obtained an M.A in Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University (2014). Her research interests centre around emotion and emotion regulation in psychopathology and intervention. Email: pc2589@tc.columbia.edu

    • Thomas Derrick Hull




      Derrick  Hull is a second-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. He received an Ed.M. in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University, and an M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He investigates the unique psychological challenges of modernity using the biological and social determinants of emotion as a paradigm case. His research focuses on 1) regulatory flexibility, 2) the attentional components of emotion, and 3) assisted attentional disengagement through social and technological interventions to enhance coping and well-being.

      He developed the short Social Referencing Action Guide for use in coding intentional, socially-directed facial behavior, and has recently studied the extent to which these behaviors predict emotion dysregulation. Email: tdh732@mail.harvard.edu
    • Zhuoying Zhu

      Zhuoying Zhu is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. She received her B.S. (Honors) in Psychology from The University of Auckland, New Zealand, and her M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College. Her research interests are emotion-related factors in predicting adjustment to trauma and loss,  cultural variability in these factors. She is currently working on a project focused on the the role of time and feedback in emotion regulation flexibility. Email: zz2180@columbia.edu


    • Jenny Lotterman


      Jenny Lotterman is a fourth-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Teachers College, Columbia University. She received her B.A. in philosophy from Ithaca College in 2008. Her research interests include the role of memory bias in depression and trajectories of grief,  chronic depression following bereavement and potentially traumatic events, and the experience of new mothers whose child goes through a period in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). She is currently collecting her dissertation research in the NICU. Email: jl3533@columbia.edu

    • Erica Diminich

      Erica Diminich is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program.  She received her B.A. in Psychology from New York University, and an M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include the role of positive emotion following traumatic events and the effects of emotion on cognition. She is currently working on a project investigating the relationship of facial displays of emotion as predictors of pathology or resiliency among bereaved individuals.Email: ed2323@columbia.edu
    • Chuck Burton

      Chuck Burton  is a fifth-year student in the clinical psychology doctoral program at Teachers College, Columbia University. He received his B.A. from Columbia College and worked in a variety of research settings prior to joining the Loss, Trauma and Emotion Lab. His research interests center on personality and biological mechanisms that underlie emotional regulation in clinical and subclinical populations and the role of social relations in adjustment to adversity. For his dissertation research, he is validating a questionnaire measure of expressive flexibility. Email: chuck.levi@gmail.com
    • Oscar Yan

      Oscar Yan  is a fifth-year doctoral student. Email: ohy2101@columbia.edu