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Graduate Research in Art Education Conference

Description: GRADUATE RESEARCH IN ART EDUCATION CONFERENCE
TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
Cowin Center, (Horace Mann 147) Teachers College. Columbia University

Graduate research in art education conference
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PROGRAM: FRIDAY NOVEMBER 7, 6.30 – 8.00PM
Cowin Center, Horace Mann Building, Teachers College

MYERS LECTURE: Charles Garoian
The Play in Art Research
Charles is the Director, School of Visual Arts and Professor of Art Education at Penn State University. He is the author of Performing Pedagogy: Toward an Art of Politics (SUNY, 1999) and co-author with Yvonne Gaudelius of Spectacle Pedagogy: Art, Politics, and Visual Culture (SUNY, 2008). His scholarly articles are featured in journals on art and education, and he has performed and lectured in colleges and universities, galleries and museums nationally and internationally.

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PROGRAM: SATURDAY NOVEMBER 8, 9.30AM – 5.00PM
Cowin Center, Horace Mann Building, Teachers College

9:30-9:45   Overview by conference coordinators, Dr. Graeme Sullivan and Dr. Karen Keifer-Boyd and Introductions to Respondent Panel.

Panelists: Pamela Harris Lawton, Sherry Mayo, Aphrodite Désirée Navab, Dan Serig

MORNING SESSION: CONTEXTS AS SITES FOR RESEARCH

9:45-10:15   Art Museum Education in China and the United States: A Comparative Study - Yingshi Yang. Teachers College, Columbia University

10:15-10:45   From Pollination to Liquidation: The Museum as Organism - Michael Cherry. Penn State University

10:45-11:00   Panel Response

11:00-11:30   The Effects of Security Guards and Gallery Guides on Visitor Experience at the Solomon. R. Guggenheim Museum - Amanda Krantz. Penn State University

11:30-12:00   A Conceptual-Analytic Critique of Indian Education Frameworks: The Role of a Socially and Culturally Responsive Arts Curriculum in Enhancing Capabilities - Nisha Nair. Teachers College, Columbia University

12:00-12:15   Panel Response

12:15-1:30   LUNCH (local restaurants)

AFTERNOON SESSION: SELF AS A SITE FOR RESEARCH

1:30-2:00   A History of the Artist-Teacher: George Wallis And his 19th Century Pedagogy  - G. James Daichendt. Teachers College, Columbia University

2:00-2:30   (Pr)Essence Training: Learning to Learn through the Becoming of Performance Group Goat Island - Jorge Lucero. Penn State University

2:30-2:45   Panel Response

2:45-3:15   I(magining)--Thou and iMac: the (Im)possible Possible - Heather Kaplan. Penn State University

3:15-3:45   Memory’s Construction in Autobiographical Film: Personal and Cultural Experience in the Work of Remembering Artists - Tamar Efrat. Teachers College, Columbia University

3:45-4:00   Panel Response

4:00-4:30   Closing Remarks

5:30-8:00   Pot Luck: Macy Gallery

Individuals with disabilities are invited to request reasonable accommodations including, but not limited to sign language interpretation, Braille or large print materials, and a campus map of accessible features.  Address these requests to the Office of Access and Services for Individuals with Disabilities at (212) 678-3689, keller@tc.edu , or Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services at (212) 678-3853 V/TTY, jaech@tc.edu . While every effort will be made to fulfill all requests for reasonable accommodations regardless of when these requests are made, making requests a minimum of two weeks prior to the event will ensure that accommodations will be provided.
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RESPONDENT PANEL

Pamela Harris Lawton
Pam is Assistant Professor/Coordinator in the Art Education Program, Corcoran College of Art and Design, Washington, DC. Previously she directed the art education program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and taught art education courses at the Tyler School of Art. Pam is a practicing artist whose artistic and scholarly research revolves around visual narrative and intergenerational arts learning in community settings. A recent example is the intergenerational research project Pam undertook with art students from the University of North Carolina and the homeless served by the Urban Ministries Center in Charlotte. In addition to several journal articles and book chapters, a book on her dissertation research, Artstories: Narrative Construction in Intergenerational and Transformative Learning, was released in October 2008. Pam graduated from the Art and Art Education program at Teachers College in 2004.

Sherry Mayo
Sherry is an artist-educator whose scholarly interests include digital aesthetics, the cultural impact of digital technologies, and the post-human. Recent publications include: The Prelude to the Millennium: The Backstory of Digital Aesthetics, (Journal of Aesthetic Education), and Implications for Art Education in the Third Millennium: Art Technology Integration, (Art Education). Sherry’s research interests also include arts technology integration in higher education and combining traditional and digital materials in studio practice. As a practitioner she is thoroughly engaged with painting and drawing and also integrates digital processes as she pleases. Recent exhibitions include Love Beyond Borders, Brighton, UK, and Utopia: Dreams of Paradise and Possibility, Shenere Velt Gallery, Los Angeles. Sherry graduated from the Art and Art Education program at Teachers College in 2004.

Aphrodite Désirée Navab
Désirée is an Iranian-Greek-American artist and writer who investigates transnational issues in art, education, cultural and women’s studies. She has published several interdisciplinary scholarly articles dealing with issues in contemporary art. She has participated in over eighty exhibitions and is included in a number of permanent collections. Her most recent solo show, Super East-West Woman: Living On the Axis Fighting Evil Everywhere, was at Rhonda Schaller, New York, 2007. Her poetry, “Tales Left Untold,” is published in Let Me Tell You Where I've Been: New Writing by Women of the Iranian Diaspora (Karim & Milani, Eds. 2006), and “What is Home After Exile? An Iranian Greek American Homecoming,” is published in Homelands: Women’s Journeys Across Race, Place and Time (de Rivera & Tumang, Eds. 2007). Désirée graduated from the Art and Art Education program at Teachers College in 2004.

Dan Serig
Dan is Chair and Assistant Professor of Art Education at Massachusetts College of Art and Design. He recently began a new graduate travel course to Ecuador. Dan takes on many roles as teacher, artist, researcher and consultant. His expertise is infused by his continual art making, which informs his research in arts practices and his publications. He has published scholarly articles on visual metaphor (Studies in Art Education), and recently co-authored an article on the necessity of incorporating studio practices in dissertation research in the International Journal of Art and Design (UK). Dan works in collaboration with his colleague, Rob Horowitz, to evaluate arts programming and provide strategic consulting for foundations, organizations and institutions working in or with the arts. Dan graduated from the Art and Art Education program at Teachers College in 2005.

 
ABSTRACTS OF PRESENTATIONS

Art Museum Education in China and the United States: A Comparative Study
Yingshi Yang
Doctoral Student, Teachers College, Columbia University
Sponsor: Judith M. Burton
Art museums are playing increasingly important educational roles in China and the United States, two nations that are different politically, economically, socially and culturally. What emerging issues are facing this field in the two nations? What are the potential areas of international exchange and collaboration in this sector? Following a brief review of the historical developments of art museum education in the two nations, the presentation examines some contemporary issues, taking as examples the National Art Museum of China in Beijing and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The presenter will also introduce some international exchange projects that he has initiated and organized, including “Art Space for Education’s Sake: China-U.S. Conference on Art Museum Education” in Beijing in June 2008.

From Pollination to Liquidation: The Museum as Organism
Michael Cherry
Masters Student, Penn State University
Thesis Committee: Patricia Amburgy (chair) and David Ebitz
This presentation examines the role(s) of global museums as they relate to the growth of franchises and Hollywood-like, blockbuster exhibitions. In particular it will discuss the Guggenheim Museum under the management of former director Thomas Krens. Visual culture exhibitions such as the heavily criticized Giorgio Armani retrospective and the highly profiled The Art of the Motorcycle will be analyzed in terms of how visual culture pedagogies work both for the advancement of cultural capital and political agency. In addition, global museums will be analyzed as sites of competing subjectivities (local vs. global) and biological lifecycles (grow or die).

The Effects of Security Guards and Gallery Guides on Visitor Experience at the Solomon. R. Guggenheim Museum
Amanda Krantz
Masters Student, Penn State University
Thesis Committee: David Ebitz (chair) and Christine Marmé Thompson
Visitors are never in art museums without security personnel being present. Yet, despite visitors' constant exposure to security personnel, we know little about the effects of security personnel on visitor experience. My research uses quantitative and qualitative methodologies to assess the effects on visitor experience of two types of security personnel which the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum employs: traditional Security Guards and Gallery Guides who combine the roles of security guard and educator.
Findings show that Guards and Guides have similar effects on visitor experience although Guides create positive experiences for the few visitors with whom they engage in conversations.


A Conceptual-Analytic Critique of Indian Education Frameworks: The Role of a Socially and Culturally Responsive Arts Curriculum in Enhancing Capabilities
Nisha Nair
Masters Student, Teachers College, Columbia University
Adviser: Graeme Sullivan
Problems within the Indian education system such as an emphasis on rigid textbook content and student competitiveness fueled by rigorous examinations impedes the full participation of all children in the learning process. In this environment, the arts are often relegated to the background. Inclusive systems of education and curriculum practices are needed that reflect values of social justice, equality and cultural diversity, and provide opportunities to build deeper understandings of self in relation to society. A ‘capabilities 
Approach’ can serve as an alternative to an outcomes-based approach, and a socially and culturally responsive arts curriculum can facilitate capabilities development, thereby impacting inclusiveness.


A History of the Artist-Teacher: George Wallis And his 19th Century Pedagogy   
G. James Daichendt
Doctoral Student, Teachers College, Columbia University
Sponsor: John Baldacchino
The term artist-teacher has a significant presence within the contemporary art education landscape as its use extends from small community art centers to the largest museums in the world. Looking back on the first usage of the term artist-teacher by George Wallis (in the 19th century), this study constructs a pedagogical portrait of his identity associated with the term. Following a biographical approach to historical research combined with a case-study focusing on the artistic and educational experiences of Wallis, it remembers and rediscovers a forgotten and important teacher.

(Pr)Essence Training: Learning to Learn through the Becoming of Performance Group Goat Island
Jorge Lucero
Masters Student, Penn State University
Thesis Committee:  Stephanie Springgay & Charles Garoian
How do we learn learning? Being near one who does it the way you’d like to do it. This essay identifies the ‘learning’ re/dis-orientation that occurs for students of performance artists Goat Island –how their pedagogy traverses, transgresses and even transcends usual educative exchanges. Unlike a ‘banking’ system, this presence pedagogy posits relational interstices of collaged an exact bodies. These encounters foreground integrity, collaboration and acts of love (i.e., generosity, patience, and service) as the philosophical imperatives in the actual embodiment of a living pedagogical rhizome.

I(magining)--Thou and iMac: the (Im)possible Possible.
Heather Kaplan
Masters Student, Penn State University
Thesis Committee: Christine Marmé Thompson & David Ebitz
What does storytelling offer art education, education, or existence? In my study, I mine, retell and revisit various personal, familial and pop stories in exploration of the nature of storytelling.  I use Victor Turner’s notions of the liminal and processual and Martin Buber’s notion of becoming as frameworks to understand how these personal and personally chosen stories relate to the larger educational sphere. Layering stories upon stories, I construct a picture of the processual nature of becoming and illustrate the potential individual learner agency and community building paramount to notions of democratic education.

Memory’s Construction in Autobiographical Film: Personal and Cultural Experience in the Work of Remembering Artists
Tamar Efrat
Doctoral Student, Teachers College, Columbia University
Sponsor: Graeme Sullivan
This dissertation asks the questions, how do intergenerational and cultural memories get constructed? What themes and strategies are used in this endeavor? The approach taken is to analyze the filmic memories created by “remembering artists,” and also through the creation of autoethnographic videos that explore the researcher’s memories dating from childhood. Remembering artists are filmmakers who, having been shaped by historical and social events, now represent them as individual and familial narratives that reconstruct otherwise lost experience. Using video making strategies such as first-person narration, home movies and substitution, autoethnographic videos explore the themes of Memory and Time, Authenticity and Artifice, Familial Territories and Personal History.

Location: Cowin Center, Horace Mann 147

Date & Time: 11/8/2008 9:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Contact: Graeme Sullivan

Email:

Contact Phone: 212-678-3419

Contact's Affiliation: Professor, Art Education Program

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