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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Gov Cuomo Names Elana Sigall Deputy Secretary for Education

Governor Andrew Cuomo has appointed Professor Elana Sigall as New York State's Deputy Secretary for Education Published: 11/18/2014 5:34:00 PM

New hire: Amra Sabic-El-Rayess, Senior Research Associate, EPSA.

Congratulations and welcome to Amra Sabic-El_Rayess, Senior Research Associate at EPSA. Published: 11/7/2014 3:41:00 PM

New hire: Sam Abrams, Director of NCSPE.

Congratulations and welcome to Sam Abrams, Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education. Published: 11/7/2014 1:34:00 PM

Aaron Pallas in the Wall Street Journal

Professor Aaron Pallas is "cautiously optimistic" about Mayor de Blasio's vision for failing NYC schools, including the plan to have superintendents spend more time inside school buildings. Published: 11/5/2014 12:38:00 PM

Basil Smikle, Ph.D. candidate in P&E, in The Hill, September 30, 2014.

The Hill (thehill.com) is a top US political website, read by the White House and more lawmakers than any other site -- vital for policy, politics and election campaigns. Published: 10/29/2014 2:35:00 PM

Isaac Solano, M.A. student in Education Policy, in The Washington Post, Oct. 28, 2014

How I got out of poverty: -'I don't like to think of myself as an outlier' The story of how one young man went from one of the toughest neighborhoods in Denver to graduate school at Columbia University. Read the article here. Published: 10/28/2014 2:27:00 PM

Tom Bailey in Inside Higher Ed on Tuition-Free Plans at Community Colleges

Professor Tom Bailey Says that Tuition-Free Plans Could Prompt "Steep Tuition Hikes" at Community Colleges Published: 10/16/2014 10:12:00 PM

Aaron Pallas on NPR

Professor Aaron Pallas on NPR: Optional SAT is "Sensible," Especially for Colleges Seeking Diversity Published: 10/12/2014 8:31:00 PM

Amy Stuart Wells: "Colorblind" Policies Harm Our Diverse Public Schools

A policy brief by Amy Stuart Wells explains how so-called “colorblind” educational policies fail to support the diverse public schools more parents are demanding.

So-called “colorblind” educational policies not only fail to address racial inequality in American classrooms, they worsen and perpetuate it, according to an evidence-based policy brief by TC’s Amy Stuart Wells, professor of Sociology and Education. The brief, recently published by the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder, concludes that education reforms that ignore racial differences and disparities have worsened, rather than corrected, racial inequalities in student access to high-quality schooling.

In Seeing Past the “Colorblind” Myth of Education Policy: Why Policymakers Should Address Racial/Ethnic Inequality and Support Culturally Diverse Schools, Wells describes “mounting evidence to suggest that so-called ‘colorblind’ accountability and school choice policies, premised on narrow definitions of school quality and absent interventions to support diversity, exacerbate racial and social class segregation and inequality.”

Wells, who is also the Director of the Center for Understanding Race and Education (CURE) at TC, concludes that the most popular education policies of the last 30 years – namely, school choice policies and strict accountability systems – rarely consider race, diversity, or the dramatic racial and ethnic demographic shifts taking place in the public school population. As a result, she argues, these policies advance an ineffective “colorblind” approach to educational reform that ignores stark racial inequality when implementing policies and then bemoans vivid racial inequalities in educational outcomes.

The policy brief raises serious concerns about the capacity of the current education policy agenda to promote racial equality and prepare children for the 21st century. The U.S. Department of Education’s enrollment data suggest that by this fall the public school student population will be less than 50 percent white, non-Hispanic for the first time in U.S. history.  On March 21, the Department’s Civil Rights division released another report finding that minority students are more likely to be suspended from schools – including from preschools – and have less access in general to preschool, advanced courses and college counselors.
 
Meanwhile, Wells writes, ostensibly colorblind policies fail to support the multiple “educational benefits” of diverse universities, schools and classrooms.  Such benefits include lessening stereotypes while supporting better-informed class discussions, greater cross-racial understanding, and preparation to succeed in an increasingly diverse society. At the same time, a growing number of parents are seeking such diverse and dynamic educational settings for their children.

Wells notes that the Civil Rights era of the 1960s and 1970s saw several race-conscious education policies, including affirmative action and school desegregation, which directly addressed racial inequality. The same period, she writes, “coincided with the largest reductions in the black-white achievement gap in the nation’s history.”

By contrast, in perpetuating segregation of all kinds, contemporary “colorblind” policies “are also at odds with a multi-racial and ethnic society in which a growing number of parents and educators see the potential educational benefits of paying attention to diversity and difference as a pedagogical tool.” Racial achievement gaps, Wells contends, can only be closed “if policymakers are not blind to the role that race plays in our educational system.” She argues that education inequalities must be proactively addressed with a new set of 21st century policies that embrace diversity and support diverse schools.

Wells offers a series of recommendations that address policies, practices and conditions that perpetuate segregation and inequality while simultaneously tapping into the changing racial attitudes of Americans. Educational benefits can accrue to all students in schools and classrooms that are diverse.

The report was made possible in part by funding from the Ford Foundation.

To read the full report by Amy Stuart Wells please visit http://bit.ly/1hOfazi.


(4/1/2014)

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