2012 TC Academics
Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College Columbia University

Academics

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Elissa L. Perry

Professional Background

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University
  • M.S., Carnegie Mellon University
  • B.S., Trinity College 

Scholarly Interests

  • The role of personal characteristics (e.g., age, generational membership, gender, race, disability) in human resource judgments, organizational behavior, and employment outcomes
  • Diversity training and sexual harassment awareness training

Selected Publications

Perry, E.L., Hanvongse, A., & Casoinic, D.  (2013).  Making a case for the existence of generational stereotypes:  A literature review and exploratory study.  In R. Burke, C.Cooper, & J. Field (Eds.), Handbook on Aging, Work, & Society.  London: Sage Publications.

Perry, E.L., Dokko, G., & Golom, F. (2012). The aging worker and person-environment fit. In J.W. Hedge and W.C. Borman (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Work and Aging. Oxford University Press (pp. 187-212).

Perry, E.L., Kulik, C.T., Bustamante, J., & Golom, F.D. (2010). The impact of reason for training on the relationship between "Best Practices" and sexual harassment training effectiveness. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 21(2), 187-208.

Perry, E.L., Kulik, C.T., & Field, M.P. (2009). Sexual harassment training: Recommendations to address gaps between the practitioner and research literatures. Human Resource Management, 48(5), 817-837.

Kulik, C.T., Roberson, L., & Perry, E.L. (2007). The multiple category problem: Category activation and inhibition in the hiring process. Academy of Management Review, 32, 529 - 548.

Perry, E.L., & Parlamis, J.D. (2005). Age and ageism in organizations: A review and consideration of national culture. In Konrad, A.M., Prasad, P., & Pringle, J.K. (Eds.), Handbook of Workplace Diversity. London: Sage publications.

Goldberg, C., Finkelstein, L.M., Perry, E.L., & Konrad, A.M. (2004). Job and industry fit: The effects of age and gender matches on career progress outcomes. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25, 807-830.

Perry, E. L., Hendricks, W., & Broadbent, E. (2000). An exploration of access and treatment discrimination and job satisfaction among college graduates with and without physical disabilities. Human Relations, 53, 923-955.

Perry, E.L., Davis-Blake, A., & Kulik, C.T. (1994). Explaining gender-based selection decisions: A synthesis of contextual and cognitive approaches. Academy of Management Review, 19, 786-820.

biographical information

professional organization membership

Member, Academy of Management
Member, American Psychological Association
Member, Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology
Editorial board member, Journal of Management

custom course list

ORLJ 4009: Understanding behavioral research

Overview of alternative methods of behavioral research and their relative strengths and limitations. Application of methodological principles in order to read and evaluate social science research and learn how to begin to conduct research.

ORLJ 5020: Special topics in Organizational Psychology

Faculty. New and emerging developments, practices, and concerns in the field of social-organizational psychology are examined and evaluated. Topics are announced in the schedules distributed each semester.

ORLJ 6045: Demography in Organizations

This course seeks to understand the role that demography plays in organizations. The main focus in this course is on demographic variables such as race, gender, and disability. The course examines various theoretical frameworks that help us to understand how demographic variables influence organizational behavior and decisions.

ORLJ 6500: Stereotypes & Stereotypic Processes in Organizational Contexts

Course description & objectives: Research and theory suggest that individuals process information about others using more or less cognitive effort.  The most effortful processing is slow, requires greater cognitive resources and entails processing all of the information about a particular target carefully and thoroughly (systematic or piece meal based processing).  Less effortful processing is relatively faster, requires fewer cognitive resources and entails the use of heuristics, categories, and stereotypes to process information about other individuals (heuristic or category based processing).  Category based processing and the resultant activation and use of stereotypes is ubiquitous because perceivers are often faced with multiple stimuli and have limited cognitive resources, particularly in organizational contexts.  These conditions make it difficult for perceivers to engage in more effortful forms of information processing.  As a result, stereotypes are an important means by which perceivers form impressions of others, and understand and interact with their social environments.  It is important to understand the role of stereotypes in information processing as well as the conditions under which stereotype activation and use are more or less likely to occur.

ORLJ 4009: Understanding behavioral research

Overview of alternative methods of behavioral research and their relative strengths and limitations. Application of methodological principles in order to read and evaluate social science research and learn how to begin to conduct research.

ORLJ 5020: Special topics in Organizational Psychology

Faculty. New and emerging developments, practices, and concerns in the field of social-organizational psychology are examined and evaluated. Topics are announced in the schedules distributed each semester.

ORLJ 6045: Demography in Organizations

This course seeks to understand the role that demography plays in organizations. The main focus in this course is on demographic variables such as race, gender, and disability. The course examines various theoretical frameworks that help us to understand how demographic variables influence organizational behavior and decisions.

ORLJ 6500: Stereotypes and stereotypic processes in organizational contexts

Open only to qualified doctoral students in the behavioral or social sciences. This course seeks to understand how stereotypes are typically structured and operate, as well as the types of information they include. This course specifically considers the role of stereotypes and stereotypic processes in organizational contexts.

Elissa L. Perry appeared in the following articles:

Teachers College Welcomes Sixteen New Faculty (8/1/1998)