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Distance Educators See the Need to Prove that They Teach Effectively

Several distance learning institutions have embraced assessment exams to determine how well their students are making progress. Some have abandoned teaching courses altogether and have adopted models of professors as mentors, who figure out what students know, need to know and where to go. Most prominent in this arena are Western Governors University and University of Phoenix Online, but many others are developing or have developed similar assessment models.

Several distance learning institutions have embraced assessment exams to determine how well their students are making progress. Some have abandoned teaching courses altogether and have adopted models of professors as mentors, who figure out what students know, need to know and where to go. Most prominent in this arena are Western Governors University and University of Phoenix Online, but many others are developing or have developed similar assessment models.

President Arthur Levine said that institutions are still in the beginning stages of developing these assessment models, but they will eventually be used in all aspects of higher education. "It's the future of both traditional and nontraditional education," he said.

The article, entitled "Distance Educators See the Need to Prove that They Teach Effectively" appeared in the April 13, 2001 edition of the Chronicle of Higher Education.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Distance Educators See the Need to Prove that They Teach Effectively

Several distance learning institutions have embraced assessment exams to determine how well their students are making progress. Some have abandoned teaching courses altogether and have adopted models of professors as mentors, who figure out what students know, need to know and where to go. Most prominent in this arena are Western Governors University and University of Phoenix Online, but many others are developing or have developed similar assessment models.

President Arthur Levine said that institutions are still in the beginning stages of developing these assessment models, but they will eventually be used in all aspects of higher education. "It's the future of both traditional and nontraditional education," he said.

The article, entitled "Distance Educators See the Need to Prove that They Teach Effectively" appeared in the April 13, 2001 edition of the Chronicle of Higher Education.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

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