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Examining the Value of the Arts in Education

Across the nation there is a major iniative to raise the educational standards and test student's progress. Most of the standards have involved developing curriculum frameworks that address the "core curriculum" of English, language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. But no states have yet addressed the arts, and in many cases art programs are being cut from school budgets. But research has shown that the arts are a highly significant part of student's academic lives.

Across the nation there is a major iniative to raise the educational standards and test student's progress. Most of the standards have involved developing curriculum frameworks that address the "core curriculum" of English, language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. But no states have yet addressed the arts, and in many cases art programs are being cut from school budgets. But research has shown that the arts are a highly significant part of student's academic lives.

The Center for Arts Education Research published a study in July 1999 based on the experiences of over 2000 students in public elementary and middle schools. The research showed that students involved heavily in the arts performed significantly better than those with little to no involvement "on measures of creativity, fluency, originality, elaboration, and resistance to closure." These students were also stong "in their abilities to express thoughts and ideas, exercise their imaginations, and take risks in learning."

The article, entitled "Examining the Value of the Arts in Education" appeared in the May 3rd edition of TownOnline.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Examining the Value of the Arts in Education

Across the nation there is a major iniative to raise the educational standards and test student's progress. Most of the standards have involved developing curriculum frameworks that address the "core curriculum" of English, language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. But no states have yet addressed the arts, and in many cases art programs are being cut from school budgets. But research has shown that the arts are a highly significant part of student's academic lives.

The Center for Arts Education Research published a study in July 1999 based on the experiences of over 2000 students in public elementary and middle schools. The research showed that students involved heavily in the arts performed significantly better than those with little to no involvement "on measures of creativity, fluency, originality, elaboration, and resistance to closure." These students were also stong "in their abilities to express thoughts and ideas, exercise their imaginations, and take risks in learning."

The article, entitled "Examining the Value of the Arts in Education" appeared in the May 3rd edition of TownOnline.

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