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Student Profile: Norma Nemeh

Norma Nemeh is a doctoral student in the International education and development program in the International and Transcultural Studies Department.

Norma Nemeh is a doctoral student in the International education and development program in the International and Transcultural Studies Department.  She specializes in education and peace conflict prevention. Norma will be graduating in May 2004.  During Norma's course of study she became involved in an international woman's organization called WINGS.  While involved in WINGS, it came to Norma's attention that hardly anyone in the Middle East explored the idea of women talking about their own perception of security. With this realization, Norma went to Jordan for nine months as a Fulbright scholar to explore Jordanian women's sense of their own security.  The Fulbright scholarship enabled Norma to do her field research on which her dissertation is based.

 

 Norma's dissertation looks at how women in the Middle East define the terms and conditions of security.   It explores how women develop their thoughts and perceptions about security.  Norma interviewed Jordanian women in different parts of Jordan and found that women tend to focus on the human factor of security.  They tend to look at survival realities and basic necessities, like food, clothing, shelter and education.  Jordanian women are concerned with ensuring the safety of their families and ensuring bright futures for their children.  These are all very human ideas for their security.  Very few participants actually named the military as part of their security factors. 

 

Norma was in Jordan for an academic year, directly after September 11, 2002.  It was an interesting time and an awkward one to be away from home.   Many of her friends and family were still here, and being an American wasn't exactly seen as the best thing in Jordan.  Norma wants to continue her research and possibly take this study and expand it onto other areas of the Middle East. 

 

"Jordan has not experienced direct conflict or war; it's constantly living under the threat of war," she said. "Women who have experienced war are the next interest, one of the aspects of my future research." 

 

Norma would also like to teach non-military aspects of education, such as education for justice, education for equality, human rights, and life.  Norma is also interested in possibly pursing a career in an international organization like WINGS in developing countries. 

 

She believes that TC has shaped her tremendously.  She came knowing that she wanted to do international education, possibly going back to Middle East and teaching there. TC directed her skills to an area where she can shine.  Betty Reardon has been a very strong and encouraging person in Norma's career path.  The faculty has always had faith in her and always guided her.  Norma began the program in fall of 1996 as an MA student, she liked it so much she decided to pursue a doctorate. 

 

Being a Fulbright Scholar has been like a "double edged sword" it has opened a number of doors in the field, but given the geo-political reality it has also closed some doors, being an American sponsored by the State department.  Being a Fulbright scholar can raise some suspicion, but generally it was a wonderful experience for Norma. She was posted in the Center of Strategic Studies at The University of Jordan, where she was given a great deal of support and guidance.

 

 Norma is originally from Jordan, her family immigrated to the United States when she was very young. 

Published Monday, Apr. 14, 2003

Student Profile: Norma Nemeh

Norma Nemeh is a doctoral student in the International education and development program in the International and Transcultural Studies Department.  She specializes in education and peace conflict prevention. Norma will be graduating in May 2004.  During Norma's course of study she became involved in an international woman's organization called WINGS.  While involved in WINGS, it came to Norma's attention that hardly anyone in the Middle East explored the idea of women talking about their own perception of security. With this realization, Norma went to Jordan for nine months as a Fulbright scholar to explore Jordanian women's sense of their own security.  The Fulbright scholarship enabled Norma to do her field research on which her dissertation is based.

 

 Norma's dissertation looks at how women in the Middle East define the terms and conditions of security.   It explores how women develop their thoughts and perceptions about security.  Norma interviewed Jordanian women in different parts of Jordan and found that women tend to focus on the human factor of security.  They tend to look at survival realities and basic necessities, like food, clothing, shelter and education.  Jordanian women are concerned with ensuring the safety of their families and ensuring bright futures for their children.  These are all very human ideas for their security.  Very few participants actually named the military as part of their security factors. 

 

Norma was in Jordan for an academic year, directly after September 11, 2002.  It was an interesting time and an awkward one to be away from home.   Many of her friends and family were still here, and being an American wasn't exactly seen as the best thing in Jordan.  Norma wants to continue her research and possibly take this study and expand it onto other areas of the Middle East. 

 

"Jordan has not experienced direct conflict or war; it's constantly living under the threat of war," she said. "Women who have experienced war are the next interest, one of the aspects of my future research." 

 

Norma would also like to teach non-military aspects of education, such as education for justice, education for equality, human rights, and life.  Norma is also interested in possibly pursing a career in an international organization like WINGS in developing countries. 

 

She believes that TC has shaped her tremendously.  She came knowing that she wanted to do international education, possibly going back to Middle East and teaching there. TC directed her skills to an area where she can shine.  Betty Reardon has been a very strong and encouraging person in Norma's career path.  The faculty has always had faith in her and always guided her.  Norma began the program in fall of 1996 as an MA student, she liked it so much she decided to pursue a doctorate. 

 

Being a Fulbright Scholar has been like a "double edged sword" it has opened a number of doors in the field, but given the geo-political reality it has also closed some doors, being an American sponsored by the State department.  Being a Fulbright scholar can raise some suspicion, but generally it was a wonderful experience for Norma. She was posted in the Center of Strategic Studies at The University of Jordan, where she was given a great deal of support and guidance.

 

 Norma is originally from Jordan, her family immigrated to the United States when she was very young. 
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