Educator, Author, and Social Critic Neil Postman Dies | Teachers College Columbia University

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Educator, Author, and Social Critic Neil Postman Dies

TC alumnus Neil Postman, whose writings warned about the impending dangers of technology in American society, died last Sunday from lung cancer.

TC alumnus Neil Postman, whose writings warned about the impending dangers of technology in American society, died last Sunday from lung cancer. Postman, who received both his master's and doctorate degrees at TC, was best known for his social criticism and cautionary perspective on the topic. He said that television had become "the command center" of American society, and that this was not good news. "I am not a Luddite," Postman once said during an interview, "[but] I am suspicious of technology. I am perfectly aware of its benefits, but I also try to pay attention to some of the negative effects."

His best-known books on the subject include Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business (1985), The Disappearance of Childhood, (1994) and Building a Bridge to the 18th Century (1999).


The article, entitled "Neil Postman, 72; Author Warned of Technology Threats" appeared in the October 14 edition of the Los Angeles Times.

Published Monday, Nov. 17, 2003

Educator, Author, and Social Critic Neil Postman Dies

TC alumnus Neil Postman, whose writings warned about the impending dangers of technology in American society, died last Sunday from lung cancer. Postman, who received both his master's and doctorate degrees at TC, was best known for his social criticism and cautionary perspective on the topic. He said that television had become "the command center" of American society, and that this was not good news. "I am not a Luddite," Postman once said during an interview, "[but] I am suspicious of technology. I am perfectly aware of its benefits, but I also try to pay attention to some of the negative effects."

His best-known books on the subject include Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business (1985), The Disappearance of Childhood, (1994) and Building a Bridge to the 18th Century (1999).


The article, entitled "Neil Postman, 72; Author Warned of Technology Threats" appeared in the October 14 edition of the Los Angeles Times.

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