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Quiet Students Can Speak Volumes Through Actions

Teachers sometimes overlook their quiet students in class, but Professor Anne Sabatini stresses the importance of making every child feel included.

Teachers sometimes overlook their quiet students in class, but Professor Anne Sabatini stresses the importance of making every child feel included.  "We need to make room for every child in the classroom," said the professor of curriculum and teaching who is also a veteran teacher herself. "It's a belief system. Without unconditional acceptance of each child, a teacher will have difficulty reaching all children."

Professor Sabatini recommended establishing cooperative learning environments as a strategy for incorporating quiet children in class activities.  In such a setting, heterogeneous groups comprised of quiet and outgoing children can work collaboratively to complete a task, thereby drawing upon the skills each individual can contribute.

The article, entitled "When Quiet Kids Get Forgotten in Class," appeared in the April 26 edition of The Christian Science Monitor.

Published Friday, Apr. 29, 2005

Quiet Students Can Speak Volumes Through Actions

Teachers sometimes overlook their quiet students in class, but Professor Anne Sabatini stresses the importance of making every child feel included.  "We need to make room for every child in the classroom," said the professor of curriculum and teaching who is also a veteran teacher herself. "It's a belief system. Without unconditional acceptance of each child, a teacher will have difficulty reaching all children."

Professor Sabatini recommended establishing cooperative learning environments as a strategy for incorporating quiet children in class activities.  In such a setting, heterogeneous groups comprised of quiet and outgoing children can work collaboratively to complete a task, thereby drawing upon the skills each individual can contribute.

The article, entitled "When Quiet Kids Get Forgotten in Class," appeared in the April 26 edition of The Christian Science Monitor.

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