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Righting Wrongs in Educational Programs

After four years of researching the country's graduate education programs, President Arthur Levine talked about ways to possibly right their wrongs during a recent conference sponsored by TC's Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media.

After four years of researching the country's graduate education programs, President Arthur Levine talked about ways to possibly right their wrongs during a recent conference sponsored by TC's Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media.  Levine described Ed.D. programs as incoherent and recommended Ph.D. programs in school leadership be reserved for researchers.  He further added that masters' degree programs offer "mastery of nothing."

At the conference attended by education reporters from across the country, Levine also found fault with schools of education admitting students for profit-making purposes.  "We take in anybody with a credit card," he said in general of the nation's 1,200 education schools. "We take in people looking for fast, quick, easy degrees."

The article, entitled "Study Criticizes Ed.D. Program," appeared in the March 15 edition of the Hartford Courant

Published Sunday, Mar. 20, 2005

Righting Wrongs in Educational Programs

After four years of researching the country's graduate education programs, President Arthur Levine talked about ways to possibly right their wrongs during a recent conference sponsored by TC's Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media.  Levine described Ed.D. programs as incoherent and recommended Ph.D. programs in school leadership be reserved for researchers.  He further added that masters' degree programs offer "mastery of nothing."

At the conference attended by education reporters from across the country, Levine also found fault with schools of education admitting students for profit-making purposes.  "We take in anybody with a credit card," he said in general of the nation's 1,200 education schools. "We take in people looking for fast, quick, easy degrees."

The article, entitled "Study Criticizes Ed.D. Program," appeared in the March 15 edition of the Hartford Courant

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