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Schools Get Tailored Cyberattack Data

U.S. colleges and universities now have their own version of DShield, a popular service that analyzes security data to help fend off cyber attacks.
U.S. colleges and universities now have their own version of DShield, a popular service that analyzes security data to help fend off cyber attacks.

The service for the academic world is the first sector-specific version of DShield, which was launched as a freely available, global service in 2000. Three universities have signed on for the pilot, which was announced on Tuesday. Other colleges and universities have been encouraged to join.

"The goal is to have an accurate assessment of information security in academic institutions," said Steffani Burd, executive director for the group running the service. The project is sponsored by the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice and run by Columbia University's Teachers College in New York.

The tailored DShield service will work just like the worldwide version, but will analyze data only provided by the schools. Academic organizations are expected to submit logs from their firewall and intrusion detection systems so the service can parse the data and generate reports on attacks. Those reports can then be used to protect networks.

This article, written by Joris Evers, appeared in the October 18th, 2005 publication of The New York Times.

Published Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2005

Schools Get Tailored Cyberattack Data

U.S. colleges and universities now have their own version of DShield, a popular service that analyzes security data to help fend off cyber attacks.

The service for the academic world is the first sector-specific version of DShield, which was launched as a freely available, global service in 2000. Three universities have signed on for the pilot, which was announced on Tuesday. Other colleges and universities have been encouraged to join.

"The goal is to have an accurate assessment of information security in academic institutions," said Steffani Burd, executive director for the group running the service. The project is sponsored by the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice and run by Columbia University's Teachers College in New York.

The tailored DShield service will work just like the worldwide version, but will analyze data only provided by the schools. Academic organizations are expected to submit logs from their firewall and intrusion detection systems so the service can parse the data and generate reports on attacks. Those reports can then be used to protect networks.

This article, written by Joris Evers, appeared in the October 18th, 2005 publication of The New York Times.

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