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For SAT Maker, A Broader Push In The Classroom

To generations of students and their teachers, the College Board has been synonymous with the SAT test. But these days it has broader ambitions and wants to reach deeply into high school and even middle school classrooms nationwide.

To generations of students and their teachers, the College Board has been synonymous with the SAT test. But these days it has broader ambitions and wants to reach deeply into high school and even middle school classrooms nationwide.

The board is marketing new products, like English and math curriculums for grades 6 through 12. It has worked with New York City to start five College Board Schools, with plans to open 13 more in New York and other cities by 2007. It is also trying to improve existing schools, starting this fall with 11 public high schools outside New York State and adding 19 next year. In November, it will open an institute for principals.

The board says it is eager to bring new rigor to education. But these efforts are also being driven by the fact that the board, a nonprofit organization based in New York City, is no longer an unrivaled force. It faces strong competition from the ACT in college admissions testing, and some colleges are making the SAT optional. Recent gaffes in SAT scoring raised questions of confidence in the test and the organization.

"If the College Board did nothing and kept on doing what it was doing, it would have been eaten up," said Arthur E. Levine, a former president of Teachers College, Columbia University, who recently became president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

This article, written by Karen W. Arenson, appeared in the August 16th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

Published Sunday, Aug. 20, 2006

For SAT Maker, A Broader Push In The Classroom

To generations of students and their teachers, the College Board has been synonymous with the SAT test. But these days it has broader ambitions and wants to reach deeply into high school and even middle school classrooms nationwide.

The board is marketing new products, like English and math curriculums for grades 6 through 12. It has worked with New York City to start five College Board Schools, with plans to open 13 more in New York and other cities by 2007. It is also trying to improve existing schools, starting this fall with 11 public high schools outside New York State and adding 19 next year. In November, it will open an institute for principals.

The board says it is eager to bring new rigor to education. But these efforts are also being driven by the fact that the board, a nonprofit organization based in New York City, is no longer an unrivaled force. It faces strong competition from the ACT in college admissions testing, and some colleges are making the SAT optional. Recent gaffes in SAT scoring raised questions of confidence in the test and the organization.

"If the College Board did nothing and kept on doing what it was doing, it would have been eaten up," said Arthur E. Levine, a former president of Teachers College, Columbia University, who recently became president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

This article, written by Karen W. Arenson, appeared in the August 16th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.
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