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POINTERS FOR PARENTS -The Importance Of Bedtime Routines

One of the best things you can do for your child is also the hardest to stick to: establishing regular bedtime routines. Not only do they give youngsters a sense of stability, but-done right-make bedtime more comforting.

One of the best things you can do for your child is also the hardest to stick to: establishing regular bedtime routines. Not only do they give youngsters a sense of stability, but-done right-make bedtime more comforting. 

"Rituals add balance and order to kids' lives, which is why they love them so much," explains Dr. Renee Cherow-O'Leary, a professor at Columbia University's Teachers College and president of Education for the 21st Century. "And bedtime is a perfect time to establish rituals that can actually strengthen family bonds."

Yet given the complexities of modern life, it's not surprising that studies show that such ritualized bedtimes are on the decline. Experts suggest developing a schedule to help keep your children on track:  Sleepytime-Ideally a time of what Dr. Cherow-O'Leary calls "closeness and closure on the day," it should be used for quiet talk. "Use phrases that trigger memory, such as 'Wasn't it fun when we saw that squirrel in the park today?"' she suggests. 

This article appeared in the December 9, 2006 edition of the napsnet.com.

http://www.napsnet.com/lastweek/53150.html

Published Monday, Dec. 11, 2006

POINTERS FOR PARENTS -The Importance Of Bedtime Routines

One of the best things you can do for your child is also the hardest to stick to: establishing regular bedtime routines. Not only do they give youngsters a sense of stability, but-done right-make bedtime more comforting. 

"Rituals add balance and order to kids' lives, which is why they love them so much," explains Dr. Renee Cherow-O'Leary, a professor at Columbia University's Teachers College and president of Education for the 21st Century. "And bedtime is a perfect time to establish rituals that can actually strengthen family bonds."

Yet given the complexities of modern life, it's not surprising that studies show that such ritualized bedtimes are on the decline. Experts suggest developing a schedule to help keep your children on track:  Sleepytime-Ideally a time of what Dr. Cherow-O'Leary calls "closeness and closure on the day," it should be used for quiet talk. "Use phrases that trigger memory, such as 'Wasn't it fun when we saw that squirrel in the park today?"' she suggests. 

This article appeared in the December 9, 2006 edition of the napsnet.com.

http://www.napsnet.com/lastweek/53150.html
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