Analysts Advised Not to Make Assumptions About Patients' Cul... | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Analysts Advised Not to Make Assumptions About Patients' Culture

When patients identify with two or more cultures, they may experience a mild dissociative process and thus need help integrating their different selves.
When patients identify with two or more cultures, they may experience a mild dissociative process and thus need help integrating their different selves.

First, think about what culture means. It doesn't invariably mean country of origin, current nationality, race, religion, or other obvious demographic factors, Susan Bodnar, Ph.D., an adjunct professor of clinical psychology at Columbia University, Teachers College, pointed out. It can also designate micro-cultures within larger cultural landscapes--say, business executives who go drinking together.

This article, written by Joan Arehart-Treichel, appeared in the March 4th, 2006 publication of Psychiatric News.


Published Monday, Mar. 6, 2006

Analysts Advised Not to Make Assumptions About Patients' Culture

When patients identify with two or more cultures, they may experience a mild dissociative process and thus need help integrating their different selves.

First, think about what culture means. It doesn't invariably mean country of origin, current nationality, race, religion, or other obvious demographic factors, Susan Bodnar, Ph.D., an adjunct professor of clinical psychology at Columbia University, Teachers College, pointed out. It can also designate micro-cultures within larger cultural landscapes--say, business executives who go drinking together.

This article, written by Joan Arehart-Treichel, appeared in the March 4th, 2006 publication of Psychiatric News.


How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends