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50 Years of Open-Minded Interviews

As the show marks its 50th anniversary today, the "Open Mind" moderator, Richard D. Heffner, trades seats to be interviewed about his many conversations with the country's leading thinkers.
As the show marks its 50th anniversary today, the "Open Mind" moderator, Richard D. Heffner, trades seats to be interviewed about his many conversations with the country's leading thinkers.

"The Open Mind" was first broadcast on the NBC station in New York. At the time, Mr. Heffner was teaching American history and political science at Rutgers, where he had been since 1948. "I realized," he said, "there are other ways to teach, to reach people, with ideas and information. The media could be used."

Forget about retirement plans. Mr. Heffner's latest project is with Teachers College at Columbia University and propels "The Open Mind" into the digital age.

"I realize how lucky I've been," Mr. Heffner said. "I deal with fascinating people who have fascinating ideas. I think I've made it this long because I've been so stimulated. This has been a lifesaver."

This article, written by Felicia R. Lee, appeared in the May 13th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

Published Tuesday, May. 16, 2006

50 Years of Open-Minded Interviews

As the show marks its 50th anniversary today, the "Open Mind" moderator, Richard D. Heffner, trades seats to be interviewed about his many conversations with the country's leading thinkers.

"The Open Mind" was first broadcast on the NBC station in New York. At the time, Mr. Heffner was teaching American history and political science at Rutgers, where he had been since 1948. "I realized," he said, "there are other ways to teach, to reach people, with ideas and information. The media could be used."

Forget about retirement plans. Mr. Heffner's latest project is with Teachers College at Columbia University and propels "The Open Mind" into the digital age.

"I realize how lucky I've been," Mr. Heffner said. "I deal with fascinating people who have fascinating ideas. I think I've made it this long because I've been so stimulated. This has been a lifesaver."

This article, written by Felicia R. Lee, appeared in the May 13th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

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