Take This Internship and Shove It | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Take This Internship and Shove It

What if the growth of unpaid internships is bad for the labor market and for individual careers? A national survey by Vault, a career information Web site, found that 84 percent of college students in April planned to complete at least one internship before graduating, and that half of all internships are unpaid.
What if the growth of unpaid internships is bad for the labor market and for individual careers? A national survey by Vault, a career information Web site, found that 84 percent of college students in April planned to complete at least one internship before graduating, and that half of all internships are unpaid.

A 1998 survey of nearly 700 employers by the Institute on Education and the Economy at Columbia University's Teachers College found: "Compared to unpaid internships, paid placements are strongest on all measures of internship quality. The quality measures are also higher for those firms who intend to hire their interns."

This article, written by Anya Kamenetz, appeared in the May 30th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

Published Wednesday, May. 31, 2006

Take This Internship and Shove It

What if the growth of unpaid internships is bad for the labor market and for individual careers? A national survey by Vault, a career information Web site, found that 84 percent of college students in April planned to complete at least one internship before graduating, and that half of all internships are unpaid.

A 1998 survey of nearly 700 employers by the Institute on Education and the Economy at Columbia University's Teachers College found: "Compared to unpaid internships, paid placements are strongest on all measures of internship quality. The quality measures are also higher for those firms who intend to hire their interns."

This article, written by Anya Kamenetz, appeared in the May 30th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends