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Bard College Sets Sights on Wall Street With Business Degree Program

This fall, students at the college will be able to earn a bachelor of science degree in economics and finance, as part of a new five-year dual degree program.
Bard College, the scenic liberal arts institution in Annandale-on-Hudson, is taking a bite out of Wall Street. This fall, students at the college will be able to earn a bachelor of science degree in economics and finance, as part of a new five-year dual degree program.
 
Bachelor of arts students are always in demand for managerial positions because "they have a better sense of the world that we live in," Mr. Papadimitriou, who is also executive vice president of Bard, said. Listing areas such as arts, culture, music, and science, he asked, "What better preparation can there be to a global economy?"
 
The vice provost of Columbia University's Teachers College, William Baldwin, said people generally tend to have too narrow a conception of liberal arts education. "There's the view that it's disconnected from professional and more applied domains," he said. "I actually think it makes more sense to really undergird any professional preparation with a broad liberal arts education."
 
This article appeared in the New York Sun.  
 

Published Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2007

Bard College Sets Sights on Wall Street With Business Degree Program

Bard College, the scenic liberal arts institution in Annandale-on-Hudson, is taking a bite out of Wall Street. This fall, students at the college will be able to earn a bachelor of science degree in economics and finance, as part of a new five-year dual degree program.
 
Bachelor of arts students are always in demand for managerial positions because "they have a better sense of the world that we live in," Mr. Papadimitriou, who is also executive vice president of Bard, said. Listing areas such as arts, culture, music, and science, he asked, "What better preparation can there be to a global economy?"
 
The vice provost of Columbia University's Teachers College, William Baldwin, said people generally tend to have too narrow a conception of liberal arts education. "There's the view that it's disconnected from professional and more applied domains," he said. "I actually think it makes more sense to really undergird any professional preparation with a broad liberal arts education."
 
This article appeared in the New York Sun.  
 
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