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Belated tributes to a notable African-American artist

He's the first African-American artist to portray racial themes within the context of modernism.
the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas is to be commended for pulling together “Aaron Douglas: African American Modernist.” The much-needed exhibit opens to the public today and will be on display through Dec. 2 at the museum in Lawrence.
 
Before dying in 1979, Douglas was the foremost visual artist of the Harlem Renaissance and had a major effect on the American art scene with works that incorporated music, dance, literature and politics.
 
Douglas was born May 26, 1899, in Topeka and was encouraged by his mother to pursue his creativity. He attended Topeka High School and graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1922 with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts. He also graduated from Teachers College of Columbia University in New York.
 
This article appeared in the September 7, 2007 edition of the Kansas City Star.
 

Published Tuesday, Sep. 11, 2007

Belated tributes to a notable African-American artist

the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas is to be commended for pulling together “Aaron Douglas: African American Modernist.” The much-needed exhibit opens to the public today and will be on display through Dec. 2 at the museum in Lawrence.
 
Before dying in 1979, Douglas was the foremost visual artist of the Harlem Renaissance and had a major effect on the American art scene with works that incorporated music, dance, literature and politics.
 
Douglas was born May 26, 1899, in Topeka and was encouraged by his mother to pursue his creativity. He attended Topeka High School and graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1922 with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts. He also graduated from Teachers College of Columbia University in New York.
 
This article appeared in the September 7, 2007 edition of the Kansas City Star.
 
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