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In Honor of Roger Fisher

The International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution mourns the death of Roger Fisher, a pioneer in the field of conflict resolution and negotiation. He died on Saturday, August 25th at age 90.

The International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution mourns the death of Roger Fisher, a pioneer in the field of conflict resolution and negotiation. He died on Saturday, August 25th at age 90. 

Fisher is best known for his book “Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement without Giving In” co-written with William Ury and Bruce Patton. Since 1981, the book has sold millions of copies worldwide and has been translated into 36 languages. Fisher was also co-founder of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard University and worked as a professor at Harvard Law School.  Fisher re-defined negotiation as a process where people work together, rather than against each other, to reach an agreement. His seminal ideas built the foundation for the field of conflict resolution and negotiation, defining practical skills for negotiators at all levels.  

From Leslie Kaufman’s account of Fisher’s life in The New York Times:

His upbeat approach to some of the world’s most intractable problems led some critics to assert that he was unrealistic. But Mr. Patton said Professor Fisher recognized and relished the “complexity and irrationality” of the situations he addressed.

Fisher is survived by another son, Peter; two brothers, John and Frank; and five grandchildren.
 

Published Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

In Honor of Roger Fisher

The International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution mourns the death of Roger Fisher, a pioneer in the field of conflict resolution and negotiation. He died on Saturday, August 25th at age 90. 

Fisher is best known for his book “Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement without Giving In” co-written with William Ury and Bruce Patton. Since 1981, the book has sold millions of copies worldwide and has been translated into 36 languages. Fisher was also co-founder of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard University and worked as a professor at Harvard Law School.  Fisher re-defined negotiation as a process where people work together, rather than against each other, to reach an agreement. His seminal ideas built the foundation for the field of conflict resolution and negotiation, defining practical skills for negotiators at all levels.  

From Leslie Kaufman’s account of Fisher’s life in The New York Times:

His upbeat approach to some of the world’s most intractable problems led some critics to assert that he was unrealistic. But Mr. Patton said Professor Fisher recognized and relished the “complexity and irrationality” of the situations he addressed.

Fisher is survived by another son, Peter; two brothers, John and Frank; and five grandchildren.
 
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