Professor Weneck announces the release of the video | History and Education | Arts and Humanities

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History & Education

In the Department of Arts & Humanities

Professor Weneck announces the release of the video Teaching in the Archives: The Fundamentals of Historical Literacy

The production of the video grew out of her Spring 2015 course, “The History of Education in New York City.”  A collaborative effort of the Teachers College Center on History and Education and the Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning, Teaching in the Archives documents students at work on a class project that explores local (NYC) educational history, the basics of archival research, and the meaning of historical literacy.  Students investigate the history of education on the neighborhood and community level from the perspective of the development of the branch libraries of The New York Public Library. Understudied sites of teaching and learning, their development add an important dimension to our knowledge of the history of education in New York City. Teaching in the Archives speaks to this point, and the power of archival research to support students’ understanding and appreciation of the historical process.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Published Friday, Oct. 14, 2016

Professor Weneck announces the release of the video Teaching in the Archives: The Fundamentals of Historical Literacy

The production of the video grew out of her Spring 2015 course, “The History of Education in New York City.”  A collaborative effort of the Teachers College Center on History and Education and the Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning, Teaching in the Archives documents students at work on a class project that explores local (NYC) educational history, the basics of archival research, and the meaning of historical literacy.  Students investigate the history of education on the neighborhood and community level from the perspective of the development of the branch libraries of The New York Public Library. Understudied sites of teaching and learning, their development add an important dimension to our knowledge of the history of education in New York City. Teaching in the Archives speaks to this point, and the power of archival research to support students’ understanding and appreciation of the historical process.

Watch the video on YouTube.

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