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Event Details: Neuroscience Lecture Series: Bruce S. McEwen, Ph.D. | The Brain on Stress: What Does Neuroscience Tell Us About Therapies for Brain Health?

Description:






























The brain is the central organ of stress and adaptation to stress because it perceives and determines what is threatening, as well as the behavioral and physiological responses to the stressor. The adult, as well as developing brain, possess a remarkable ability to show structural and functional plasticity in response to stressful and other experiences, including neuronal replacement, dendritic remodeling, and synapse turnover. This is particularly evident in the hippocampus, where all three types of structural plasticity have been recognized and investigated, using a combination of morphological, molecular, pharmacological, electrophysiological and behavioral approaches. The amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, brain regions involved in anxiety and fear, mood, cognitive function and behavioral control, also show structural plasticity. Acute and chronic stress cause an imbalance of neural circuitry subserving cognition, decision making, anxiety and mood that can increase or decrease expression of those behaviors and behavioral states. In the short term, such as for increased fearful vigilance and anxiety in a threatening environment, these changes may be adaptive; but, if the danger passes and the behavioral state persists along with the changes in neural circuitry, such maladaptation may need intervention with a combination of pharmacological and behavioral therapies, as is the case for chronic or mood anxiety disorders. There are important sex differences in how the brain responds to stressors that are in urgent need of further exploration. Moreover, adverse early life experience, interacting with alleles of certain genes, produce lasting effects on brain and body via epigenetic mechanisms. While prevention is most important, the plasticity of the brain gives hope for therapies that take into consideration brain-body interactions.
 


This event is part of the Neuroscience & Education program's Spring 2013 Neuroscience Lecture Series. Some of the most accomplished investigators in neuroscience from top universities in the NYC area will be presenting new developments in their leading-edge research on the frontiers of neuroscience.

Click Here for a full list of speakers and topics


Type: Lectures & Talks

Location: Cowin Center, 147 HM

Date & Time: 3/11/2013, 3:00 PM - 4:45 PM

Website: http://www.tc.edu/bbs/seminars

Contact: Anlys Olivera

Email:

Contact's Affiliation: Biobehavioral Sciences

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