FAQs | Movement Science and Education | Biobehavioral Sciences

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Teachers College, Columbia University
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MOTOR LEARNING & CONTROL

Motor Learning & Control

Department of Biobehavioral Sciences

Frequently Asked Questions

We adhere to an “apprenticeship model” of research advisement. Typically students start out doing a project directly on a problem worked out with the advisor, or joining an ongoing project. As research expertise in the area increases, students typically begin to carve out their own research projects under the direction of one of the faculty.

Focus is on the acquisition and control of movement for both upper and lower extremity tasks, including integration of posture and arm movement, gait and balance assessment. . Numerous projects focus on elucidating the neural bases of movement disorders, with particular emphasis on neurological diseases and disorders such as cerebral palsy, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and stroke.  There are upper extremity rehabilitation projects underway including constraint-induced therapy and bimanual training, as well as exercise and physical activity studies.

Yes. Our apprenticeship model is designed to best prepare researchers using current methodology and hypothesis-driven questions. We believe the best way to do that is to do quality work in an area related to faculty expertise. This training would allow one to transfer their knowledge to another area of research after graduating.

Our lab is equipped to study gait, and several ongoing projects examine the coordination of gait with other functional movements. However, none of the faculty have specific expertise in gait, so it would be difficult to conduct research on this topic alone. We have no expertise in orthopedics, so students with this interest would need to conduct biomechanical work in areas of ongoing work.

No. Quality research in the area means conducting work under the direct guidance of faculty. Courses are usually offered in the evening to facilitate work, but time is required in the labs during weekdays.

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