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University Seminar on Innovation in Education: The Power of Habit, with Charles Duhigg

Why is it so easy for you to effortlessly reply to emails, but so hard to automatically go for a jog? Why were some regions in Iraq wracked by riots, while in others, crowds peaceably gathered and dissipated? How did Rosa Parks trigger a year-long bus boycott in Montgomery, while the arrest of other black activists failed to spark outrage?

In his best-selling book, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, New York Times investigative reporter Charles Duhigg explains that we are living through a golden age of understanding the neurology and psychology of habit formation. Come join Mr. Duhigg to hear about how schools (and Starbucks) teach "willpower habits"; how an amnesiac named E.P. managed to rebuild his life by creating complex habits (that he could never consciously remember, but which unfolded nonetheless); and how researchers are using these insights to transform societies, organizations, families, and lives.

Charles Duhiggis a reporter at The New York Times, where he is currently overseeing The iEconomy series, which focuses on such topics as working conditions in factories manufacturing iPhones and iPads. He was a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize and is a recipient of the National Journalism Award, the Polk Award, the Loeb Award, the National Academies of Science reporting award and others. An excerpt from The Power of Habit -- detailing how Target studies shoppers' habits to determine if customers are pregnant -- appeared earlier this year in The New York Times Magazine. The Power of Habit has spent 36 weeks on the NYT Bestseller list.

On The Power of Habit:

"His core insight is sharp, provocative, and useful."
--Jim Collins, #1 bestselling author of Good to Great and Built to Last

"An intelligent model that is understandable, useful, and a flat-out great read."
--David Allen, bestselling author of Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

"Once you read this book, you'll never look at yourself, your organization, or your world quite the same way."
--Daniel H. Pink, author of #1 New York Times bestselling Drive and A Whole New Mind

"Read this book."
--Jonah Lehrer, bestselling author of Proust Was a Neuroscientist and How We Decide

Where: 305 Russell

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Jointly sponsored by the University Seminar on Ethics, Moral Education, and Society, this seminar is part of the 2012-2013 season of the University Seminar on Innovation in Education which is co-chaired by Ronald Gross who also conducts the Socratic Conversations at the Gottesman Libraries; and Robert McClintock, John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg Professor Emeritus in the Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education at Teachers College. Founded in 1970, the Seminar
explores the process of learning in individuals, organizations, and society, throughout the lifespan and via major institutions.

Individuals with disabilities are invited to request reasonable accommodations including, but not limited to sign language interpretation, Braille or large print materials, and a campus map of accessible features. Address these requests to the Office of Access and Services for Individuals with Disabilities at  (212) 678-3689 , keller@tc.edu, or Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services at  (212) 678-3853  V/TTY.  

  • Jennifer Govan
  • 212-678-3022
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