Meet Deidre Flowers,
One of TC's Rising Stars

Deidre Flowers

Dear Friend:

I’m Deidre Flowers, a Teachers College doctoral candidate and the recipient of TC’s Lawrence A. Cremin Scholarship in the History of Education. You may have read about me in the new 2015 Teachers College Annual Report, “Meeting the Challenges of Our Era.” I am grateful to our alumni who have supported students like me, and I hope you will join in making a gift to Teachers College.

Lawrence Cremin is a hero of mine because he believed that education occurs in settings ranging from public schools to street corners. I know the truth of that idea because my own family and community steeped me in the lore of the American Civil Rights Movement. I attended one of the nation’s more than 100 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and learned how these incredibly important institutions have advanced the careers and lives of black Americans.

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Yet I increasingly wondered: Where, in that story, were the contributions of women? Why, for example, is there so little awareness of Bennett College for Women in Greensboro, North Carolina, where students fought segregation in movie theaters during the 1930s and led lunch-counter sit-ins in 1960? I decided to study this overlooked chapter in American history and chose Teachers College, which prepared generations of segregation-era black teachers and administrators from Southern states that had denied them admission to graduate school. TC was also home to Cremin and pioneering black scholars such as the psychologist Edmund Gordon, the late anthropologist George Bond, and my current advisor, Cally Waite, a leading authority on HBCUs.

Initially I had to work full-time in addition to my studies and missed out on the intangibles of the TC experience: the conversations with colleagues, the lectures and conferences, the chance meetings with people in other fields that can broaden one’s interests. The Cremin Scholarship made it possible for me to immerse myself in all of these wonderful experiences and to focus full-time on my studies.

But other talented TC students aren’t as fortunate. We need your help. You can honor the legacy of a faculty member or program that shaped your TC experience. Click here to contribute to the scholarship that best matches your interests.

No gift is too small, and there’s no better contribution you can make than supporting the next generation of Teachers College scholars.

Thank you,
Deidre B. Flowers

Legacy Luminaries Wide

 

Published Wednesday, Mar. 16, 2016

Meet Deidre Flowers,
One of TC's Rising Stars

Deidre Flowers

Dear Friend:

I’m Deidre Flowers, a Teachers College doctoral candidate and the recipient of TC’s Lawrence A. Cremin Scholarship in the History of Education. You may have read about me in the new 2015 Teachers College Annual Report, “Meeting the Challenges of Our Era.” I am grateful to our alumni who have supported students like me, and I hope you will join in making a gift to Teachers College.

Lawrence Cremin is a hero of mine because he believed that education occurs in settings ranging from public schools to street corners. I know the truth of that idea because my own family and community steeped me in the lore of the American Civil Rights Movement. I attended one of the nation’s more than 100 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and learned how these incredibly important institutions have advanced the careers and lives of black Americans.

Find A tribute Scholarship Mobile

Yet I increasingly wondered: Where, in that story, were the contributions of women? Why, for example, is there so little awareness of Bennett College for Women in Greensboro, North Carolina, where students fought segregation in movie theaters during the 1930s and led lunch-counter sit-ins in 1960? I decided to study this overlooked chapter in American history and chose Teachers College, which prepared generations of segregation-era black teachers and administrators from Southern states that had denied them admission to graduate school. TC was also home to Cremin and pioneering black scholars such as the psychologist Edmund Gordon, the late anthropologist George Bond, and my current advisor, Cally Waite, a leading authority on HBCUs.

Initially I had to work full-time in addition to my studies and missed out on the intangibles of the TC experience: the conversations with colleagues, the lectures and conferences, the chance meetings with people in other fields that can broaden one’s interests. The Cremin Scholarship made it possible for me to immerse myself in all of these wonderful experiences and to focus full-time on my studies.

But other talented TC students aren’t as fortunate. We need your help. You can honor the legacy of a faculty member or program that shaped your TC experience. Click here to contribute to the scholarship that best matches your interests.

No gift is too small, and there’s no better contribution you can make than supporting the next generation of Teachers College scholars.

Thank you,
Deidre B. Flowers

Legacy Luminaries Wide

 
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