Dresses That Blink

"New Gifts" Exhibit ushers in New Creative Technologies Concentration in Arts & Art Education.‌

Technology is changing all fields, but perhaps none more dramatically than the fine arts. At TC, we have re-outfitted our sculpture studio as a fabrication laboratory, or "fab lab," with an array of digital and electronic tools to make and activate new kinds of objects that give form and expression to ideas.

As Judith Burton, Professor of Art & Art Education, put it at a recent TC symposium, "Digital technology extends our pallet of possibilities, offering fresh insights and nuance to the ways in which we make our worlds meaningful and solve problems."

TC is not alone in exploring the rich possibilities of combining technology and art, but it stands apart in preparing teachers in the arts and other fields to interweave digital tools and materials into teaching that is playful, collaborative, entrepreneurial and multi- and cross-disciplinary.

Professors Burton and Richard Jochum, together with former doctoral candidate and Instructor Sean Justice, have created a new, 15-hour Creative Technologies Concentration within TC’s Art & Art Education master's and doctoral programs. Their vision is that art is about agency and that artists are creative entrepreneurs who fashion practical approaches to realize opportunities—valuable skills in every profession and every area of life.

In broadening the nation’s teaching focus from STEM to STEAM—that is, by adding “art” to "science, technology, engineering and math"—they seek to inspire teachers and students alike to apply a wide range of imaginative approaches to the solution of everyday questions and problems. Thus our students will include not only studio artists but also teachers, principals and community outreach and development programmers. They will graduate into a New York City that is remaking itself as one of the nation’s leading centers for technology.

To celebrate and launch the new concentration, the Arts & Humanities Department mounted an art exhibit and symposium in June which showcased ways in which technology can be used to create art—for example, creations of a 3-D printer, and dresses made of fabric embedded with blinking lights. The exhibit at Macy Gallery, called “New Gifts,” was an eye-popping, interactive display of the revolutionary impact of technology on the teaching and practice of contemporary art and design. It gave viewers a sense of the possibilities inherent in combining art and technology.

(Published 7/28/2015)

Published Wednesday, Sep. 16, 2015

Dresses That Blink

"New Gifts" Exhibit ushers in New Creative Technologies Concentration in Arts & Art Education.‌

Technology is changing all fields, but perhaps none more dramatically than the fine arts. At TC, we have re-outfitted our sculpture studio as a fabrication laboratory, or "fab lab," with an array of digital and electronic tools to make and activate new kinds of objects that give form and expression to ideas.

As Judith Burton, Professor of Art & Art Education, put it at a recent TC symposium, "Digital technology extends our pallet of possibilities, offering fresh insights and nuance to the ways in which we make our worlds meaningful and solve problems."

TC is not alone in exploring the rich possibilities of combining technology and art, but it stands apart in preparing teachers in the arts and other fields to interweave digital tools and materials into teaching that is playful, collaborative, entrepreneurial and multi- and cross-disciplinary.

Professors Burton and Richard Jochum, together with former doctoral candidate and Instructor Sean Justice, have created a new, 15-hour Creative Technologies Concentration within TC’s Art & Art Education master's and doctoral programs. Their vision is that art is about agency and that artists are creative entrepreneurs who fashion practical approaches to realize opportunities—valuable skills in every profession and every area of life.

In broadening the nation’s teaching focus from STEM to STEAM—that is, by adding “art” to "science, technology, engineering and math"—they seek to inspire teachers and students alike to apply a wide range of imaginative approaches to the solution of everyday questions and problems. Thus our students will include not only studio artists but also teachers, principals and community outreach and development programmers. They will graduate into a New York City that is remaking itself as one of the nation’s leading centers for technology.

To celebrate and launch the new concentration, the Arts & Humanities Department mounted an art exhibit and symposium in June which showcased ways in which technology can be used to create art—for example, creations of a 3-D printer, and dresses made of fabric embedded with blinking lights. The exhibit at Macy Gallery, called “New Gifts,” was an eye-popping, interactive display of the revolutionary impact of technology on the teaching and practice of contemporary art and design. It gave viewers a sense of the possibilities inherent in combining art and technology.

(Published 7/28/2015)

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