Honoring a Champion of the History
of Education

Bequest from Trustee and Alumna Sue Ann Weinberg (above) will establish the Lawrence A. Cremin Professorship in the History of Education.

“Larry Cremin was a magical teacher,” says Trustee Sue Ann Weinberg (Ed.D. ’97). “He was so widely read, and he had such a broad understanding of education.”

To honor TC’s VIIth president and Pulitzer Prize–winning education historian, who was also her dissertation adviser, Sue Ann has announced a truly transformative planned gift of $3 million that, with an earlier $2 million pledge, will create the Lawrence A. Cremin Professorship in the History of Education.

“I had such a great experience at TC that opened up so many intellectual interests and pursuits for me,” says Sue Ann, who credits a course taught by Cremin as the spark that ignited her passion for TC. Sue Ann had decided to take a class or two after her children went off to school. Cremin encouraged her to take more courses, including one with Maxine Greene on “Education and Values,” and then urged her to “sketch out what a dissertation might look like—just for fun.” She went on to earn her doctorate. “Larry was trying to teach us to think critically—to see that each historian was writing from his own perspective,” she says.

With Cremin as her adviser, Sue Ann wrote her dissertation about Lewis Mumford, the philosopher and architecture critic who wrote for The New Yorker. “I think it’s important to have history written by many different people from many different points of view,” she says. She dedicated her dissertation, Lewis Mumford: critic as educator, “to the memory of Lawrence Cremin, mentor, advisor and friend.”

With her gift and the creation of the Cremin Professorship, Sue Ann is ensuring the continuation of an extraordinary legacy, and will afford future students of history the opportunity to experience the intellectual magic that Cremin made part of the enduring fabric of TC. 

“Larry was a real renaissance man,” she says. “He was constantly reading. He was interested in everything his students were doing. And he gave of himself without holding back.”

(Published 12/7/2012)

Published Sunday, Sep. 27, 2015

Honoring a Champion of the History
of Education

Bequest from Trustee and Alumna Sue Ann Weinberg (above) will establish the Lawrence A. Cremin Professorship in the History of Education.

“Larry Cremin was a magical teacher,” says Trustee Sue Ann Weinberg (Ed.D. ’97). “He was so widely read, and he had such a broad understanding of education.”

To honor TC’s VIIth president and Pulitzer Prize–winning education historian, who was also her dissertation adviser, Sue Ann has announced a truly transformative planned gift of $3 million that, with an earlier $2 million pledge, will create the Lawrence A. Cremin Professorship in the History of Education.

“I had such a great experience at TC that opened up so many intellectual interests and pursuits for me,” says Sue Ann, who credits a course taught by Cremin as the spark that ignited her passion for TC. Sue Ann had decided to take a class or two after her children went off to school. Cremin encouraged her to take more courses, including one with Maxine Greene on “Education and Values,” and then urged her to “sketch out what a dissertation might look like—just for fun.” She went on to earn her doctorate. “Larry was trying to teach us to think critically—to see that each historian was writing from his own perspective,” she says.

With Cremin as her adviser, Sue Ann wrote her dissertation about Lewis Mumford, the philosopher and architecture critic who wrote for The New Yorker. “I think it’s important to have history written by many different people from many different points of view,” she says. She dedicated her dissertation, Lewis Mumford: critic as educator, “to the memory of Lawrence Cremin, mentor, advisor and friend.”

With her gift and the creation of the Cremin Professorship, Sue Ann is ensuring the continuation of an extraordinary legacy, and will afford future students of history the opportunity to experience the intellectual magic that Cremin made part of the enduring fabric of TC. 

“Larry was a real renaissance man,” she says. “He was constantly reading. He was interested in everything his students were doing. And he gave of himself without holding back.”

(Published 12/7/2012)

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