Motivating Employees by Treating Them Well

Investment Manager Now Teaches Her Creed: In People We Trust

Galit Ben-Joseph discovered TC’s master’s degree program in organizational psychology as a fresh-faced college graduate newly in charge of “very disgruntled 65-year-olds” in check processing in the basement of a Chase Manhattan Bank in Brooklyn.

“I couldn’t believe there was a place where I could learn to be a good manager,” she says. “People get promoted because they’re good at their job. No one teaches them.”

At TC, she studied the ideas of the late psychologist Frederick Herzberg, who believed in motivating employees by treating them well, recognizing their efforts and giving them opportunities for advancement. For Ben-Joseph, whose parents emigrated from Israel, created their own business and went back to school, those ideas resonated with an out­look born of “your classic immigrant dream of making it in this wonderful country.”

After her stint at Chase, Ben-Joseph earned an MBA and worked at Goldman Sachs and Neuberger Ber­man. She is now Executive Director and Financial Advisor at J.P. Morgan Secu­rities. “I work 100 percent in finance and yet I barely took any finance courses,” she says. “Psychology makes me successful, because people have emotional attachments and issues with their money. Of course, I try to deliver a very attractive risk-adjusted return, but it’s essential that my clients know they can trust me to explain things to them in normal terms.”

In fact, Ben-Joseph considers relationship building so im­portant to management that she teaches it as Clinical As­sistant Professor at Yeshiva University.

“Throughout my entire career, I’ve been talking about these same theories and I completely believe in their power and how people respond to them,” she says.

(Published 6/5/2015)

Published Monday, Sep. 21, 2015

Motivating Employees by Treating Them Well

Investment Manager Now Teaches Her Creed: In People We Trust

Galit Ben-Joseph discovered TC’s master’s degree program in organizational psychology as a fresh-faced college graduate newly in charge of “very disgruntled 65-year-olds” in check processing in the basement of a Chase Manhattan Bank in Brooklyn.

“I couldn’t believe there was a place where I could learn to be a good manager,” she says. “People get promoted because they’re good at their job. No one teaches them.”

At TC, she studied the ideas of the late psychologist Frederick Herzberg, who believed in motivating employees by treating them well, recognizing their efforts and giving them opportunities for advancement. For Ben-Joseph, whose parents emigrated from Israel, created their own business and went back to school, those ideas resonated with an out­look born of “your classic immigrant dream of making it in this wonderful country.”

After her stint at Chase, Ben-Joseph earned an MBA and worked at Goldman Sachs and Neuberger Ber­man. She is now Executive Director and Financial Advisor at J.P. Morgan Secu­rities. “I work 100 percent in finance and yet I barely took any finance courses,” she says. “Psychology makes me successful, because people have emotional attachments and issues with their money. Of course, I try to deliver a very attractive risk-adjusted return, but it’s essential that my clients know they can trust me to explain things to them in normal terms.”

In fact, Ben-Joseph considers relationship building so im­portant to management that she teaches it as Clinical As­sistant Professor at Yeshiva University.

“Throughout my entire career, I’ve been talking about these same theories and I completely believe in their power and how people respond to them,” she says.

(Published 6/5/2015)

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