Ties that Run Deep

Hangyang University President Emeritus Chong Yang Kim (Ed. D. ’83) led a unique “crowd-sourced” donation by Korean alumni that resulted in $120,000 in pledges to the Korea 125th Anniversary Scholarship Fund at Teachers College, Columbia University, and has inspired similar efforts from alumni in other countries.

TC's Korean alumni support the College through a unique "crowd-source" donation.

Chong Yang Kim (Ed. D. ’83) is President Emeritus of Hangyang University in South Korea, Chairman of the Hangyang University Foundation and Professor in the University’s Department of Educational Technology. He has received numerous awards, including, in 2013, the Distinguished Alumni Award of Teachers College, and is past President of the Korean Alumni Association.

Following a visit by TC President Susan Fuhrman to Seoul in December 2014, Dr. Kim led a unique “crowd-sourced” donation by Korean alumni that resulted in $120,000 in pledges to the Korea 125th Anniversary Scholarship Fund and has inspired similar efforts from alumni in other countries. Below he recalls his time at TC, describes the College’s importance in South Korea and reflects on the nation’s “emerging culture of giving.”

What does Teachers College mean to you? What have you gained from your association with TC?

Teachers College is a very special place to me. Not only is it where I received my Doctor of Education, but is also the second school that I called my home away from home. As I completed my elementary to undergraduate studies in Korea, TC was an exciting experience for me. The rigorous and comprehensive curricula based on theories and practices at TC provided me with a wide range of knowledge and the skills that I have brought back to the university I am managing, Hanyang University. More specifically, TC provided me with a strong academic background grounded in educational philosophies that I have applied to the School of Education at Hanyang University. And, of course, it was very big advantage to have attended TC, because the Korean people really value the reputation of an institution. TC is known as the mecca for educational study, and also as the most comprehensive education university, with an unmatched variety of educational fields and emphasis on interdisciplinary study.  That’s very important, because in these times, a person cannot build a career with only one specialization.

Which professors influenced you the most? 

The two most influential professors I had at TC were Dr. Phillip Lange and Dr. Robert Halloway. I can’t and will never forget these two professors.

Dr. Lange took care of me like I was his own son. He guided me on my academic path as well as my professional career. Dr. Robert Halloway, former President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology in the United States, was also a mentor to me. He was an academic advisor during my doctoral studies at TC and helped me choose the right direction for my doctoral dissertation. I was also very grateful to him for catching English mistakes in my papers! He sometimes even bought me breakfast at the Whittier Hall cafeteria, where we had great conversations about the educational issues in Korea and my future career.

You earned your TC degree in Instructional Technology and Media. How important has that been to you in your career?
My degree in Instructional Technology and Media has been very important to me in my career. The knowledge and experiences I gained at TC have helped me integrate technology into the curriculum of my university in Korea. As the field of Instructional Technology was a relatively new area when I returned back to Korea, I was able to help develop the field to what it is today. My students found the ideas that I brought back to be very fresh, and they were very excited to be exposed to the most advanced knowledge in the field. I served as the President of “The Korean Society for Educational Technology” in Korea, which allowed me to introduce the field to universities across Korea and their curricula. My doctoral degree from TC has been the backbone of my strengths to manage Hanyang University, the institution that my father established.

What made you want to provide scholarship support to TC?

The motivation behind my decision to provide scholarship support to TC was, without a doubt, President Susan Fuhrman’s visit to Seoul, Korea last year. When she explained TC’s plans to fundraise in celebration of the 125th Anniversary, many Korean alumni and myself included, were inspired and impressed by the passion in her speech. So, I decided to join in the building of TC’s future. I believe that TC’s growth and development will also lead all of us to have a stronger sense of pride for TC. 

Do many people support their colleges and universities in Korea?

There has not been, until very recently, a culture of giving in Korea. That’s because for several decades, we were focused on survival—making sure that people had enough to eat, on providing them with housing and solving problems of over-crowding. But now that Korea has developed so dramatically and the economic index is going up, we are beginning to think about the care of our neighbors and the support of our institutions.

What is the importance of scholarship support that comes from a group of people, as you have done with this gift?

To be honest, most of our graduates in the educational field are not paid as highly as those in business and finance. However, our alumni willingly joining our fundraising project shows how much we love and cherish our time at TC. We wanted to give the Korean students at TC the same unforgettable experiences that we had at TC by providing them with a scholarship fund. The shared educational values and passion we learned at TC is what holds our alumni association together. This campaign for TC brought us even closer together as a group, which was one of the most valuable experiences to us.

The Korean Alumni Association is the first among the various TC clubs outside the U.S. to make such a donation. How were you able to mobilize that support?
Our fundraising efforts were also a first for our Alumni Association of Korea. We began by researching cases of other alumni associations at prestigious schools and also met with experts in fundraising for advice. We decided that a Pledge Fund with an installment plan of 3 years would be the most successful method. We thought it would encourage more participation from our alumni because it required them to send donations directly to TC.

I also think that our recent alumni events inspired our alumni to reconnect with TC. At the end of last year, I invited all of the Korean alumni to a “Night of New York Jazz in Autumn” to bring out our TC spirit. At the event, I informed every one of the goals for our fundraising campaign and encouraged everyone to take pride in being a part of TC AAK—the TC Alumni Association of Korea. I think that the combination of an emotional and professional approach resulted in a positive response from the Korean alumni. 

What lessons could the KAA share with other TC alumni associations in other countries?

I believe that there are two key factors for a successful alumni organization. First, it is important to have a charismatic leader with passion, organizational power, and financial capacity. Second, is the commitment and support of a few alumni members. Our fundraising campaign was not easy. It took many phone calls, meetings, and hard work. Behind our fundraising efforts were a few of our alumni directly calling every TC alumni in Korea, explaining the goal of the fund raising as well as the procedures of Pledge Fund. We learned that “more calls led to more donations.”

Does the KAA have any future plans you’d like to share with readers?
Yes, we are always thinking of ways to strengthen the TC alumni network in Korea, but one plan that comes to mind is our goal to create a “TC Academic Forum.” Similar to the “Columbia Forums” that have been successfully organized for five years in Korea, I believe that a TC Forum can help us facilitate discussion with experts in various fields and create more opportunities to unite the TC alumni in Korea. Additionally, I will continuously encourage the Korean alumni to have a constant interest in TC and make an effort to support our alma mater.

The Crowd Is Behind Us: Other Group Gifts that Support TC
The benefits of “crowd-sourcing,” as it’s known, are twofold: it pools the resources of multiple donors, and it brings those alumni involved closer together.

Increasingly, TC alumni, both in the United States and abroad are banding together to make scholarship gifts, many honoring favorite professors. Here are some of the most prominent efforts:

Maxine Greene Scholarship

Morton Deutsch Scholarship

Carroll F. Johnson Scholarship

Nutritional Ecology Endowed Scholarship Fund Honoring Professor Joan Gussow

A.M. Gentile Scholarship Fund in Motor Learning

Professor Jack & Edee Mezirow Endowed Scholarship Fund

The Harold J. Noah Endowed Scholarship Fund

Japan Scholarship Fund


If you want to give in honor of a beloved TC professor while also supporting current TC students, contact Linda Colquhoun, Director of Stewardship & Donor Relations, at 212 678-3679, or at Colquhoun@tc.columbia.edu 

To create a “crowd gift” in your nation, please contact Rosella Garcia, Senior Director of Alumni Relations, at 212 678-3004, or at rlg2144@tc.columbia.edu

 

(Published 6/3/2015)

Published Wednesday, Jun. 3, 2015

Ties that Run Deep

TC's Korean alumni support the College through a unique "crowd-source" donation.

Chong Yang Kim (Ed. D. ’83) is President Emeritus of Hangyang University in South Korea, Chairman of the Hangyang University Foundation and Professor in the University’s Department of Educational Technology. He has received numerous awards, including, in 2013, the Distinguished Alumni Award of Teachers College, and is past President of the Korean Alumni Association.

Following a visit by TC President Susan Fuhrman to Seoul in December 2014, Dr. Kim led a unique “crowd-sourced” donation by Korean alumni that resulted in $120,000 in pledges to the Korea 125th Anniversary Scholarship Fund and has inspired similar efforts from alumni in other countries. Below he recalls his time at TC, describes the College’s importance in South Korea and reflects on the nation’s “emerging culture of giving.”

What does Teachers College mean to you? What have you gained from your association with TC?

Teachers College is a very special place to me. Not only is it where I received my Doctor of Education, but is also the second school that I called my home away from home. As I completed my elementary to undergraduate studies in Korea, TC was an exciting experience for me. The rigorous and comprehensive curricula based on theories and practices at TC provided me with a wide range of knowledge and the skills that I have brought back to the university I am managing, Hanyang University. More specifically, TC provided me with a strong academic background grounded in educational philosophies that I have applied to the School of Education at Hanyang University. And, of course, it was very big advantage to have attended TC, because the Korean people really value the reputation of an institution. TC is known as the mecca for educational study, and also as the most comprehensive education university, with an unmatched variety of educational fields and emphasis on interdisciplinary study.  That’s very important, because in these times, a person cannot build a career with only one specialization.

Which professors influenced you the most? 

The two most influential professors I had at TC were Dr. Phillip Lange and Dr. Robert Halloway. I can’t and will never forget these two professors.

Dr. Lange took care of me like I was his own son. He guided me on my academic path as well as my professional career. Dr. Robert Halloway, former President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology in the United States, was also a mentor to me. He was an academic advisor during my doctoral studies at TC and helped me choose the right direction for my doctoral dissertation. I was also very grateful to him for catching English mistakes in my papers! He sometimes even bought me breakfast at the Whittier Hall cafeteria, where we had great conversations about the educational issues in Korea and my future career.

You earned your TC degree in Instructional Technology and Media. How important has that been to you in your career?
My degree in Instructional Technology and Media has been very important to me in my career. The knowledge and experiences I gained at TC have helped me integrate technology into the curriculum of my university in Korea. As the field of Instructional Technology was a relatively new area when I returned back to Korea, I was able to help develop the field to what it is today. My students found the ideas that I brought back to be very fresh, and they were very excited to be exposed to the most advanced knowledge in the field. I served as the President of “The Korean Society for Educational Technology” in Korea, which allowed me to introduce the field to universities across Korea and their curricula. My doctoral degree from TC has been the backbone of my strengths to manage Hanyang University, the institution that my father established.

What made you want to provide scholarship support to TC?

The motivation behind my decision to provide scholarship support to TC was, without a doubt, President Susan Fuhrman’s visit to Seoul, Korea last year. When she explained TC’s plans to fundraise in celebration of the 125th Anniversary, many Korean alumni and myself included, were inspired and impressed by the passion in her speech. So, I decided to join in the building of TC’s future. I believe that TC’s growth and development will also lead all of us to have a stronger sense of pride for TC. 

Do many people support their colleges and universities in Korea?

There has not been, until very recently, a culture of giving in Korea. That’s because for several decades, we were focused on survival—making sure that people had enough to eat, on providing them with housing and solving problems of over-crowding. But now that Korea has developed so dramatically and the economic index is going up, we are beginning to think about the care of our neighbors and the support of our institutions.

What is the importance of scholarship support that comes from a group of people, as you have done with this gift?

To be honest, most of our graduates in the educational field are not paid as highly as those in business and finance. However, our alumni willingly joining our fundraising project shows how much we love and cherish our time at TC. We wanted to give the Korean students at TC the same unforgettable experiences that we had at TC by providing them with a scholarship fund. The shared educational values and passion we learned at TC is what holds our alumni association together. This campaign for TC brought us even closer together as a group, which was one of the most valuable experiences to us.

The Korean Alumni Association is the first among the various TC clubs outside the U.S. to make such a donation. How were you able to mobilize that support?
Our fundraising efforts were also a first for our Alumni Association of Korea. We began by researching cases of other alumni associations at prestigious schools and also met with experts in fundraising for advice. We decided that a Pledge Fund with an installment plan of 3 years would be the most successful method. We thought it would encourage more participation from our alumni because it required them to send donations directly to TC.

I also think that our recent alumni events inspired our alumni to reconnect with TC. At the end of last year, I invited all of the Korean alumni to a “Night of New York Jazz in Autumn” to bring out our TC spirit. At the event, I informed every one of the goals for our fundraising campaign and encouraged everyone to take pride in being a part of TC AAK—the TC Alumni Association of Korea. I think that the combination of an emotional and professional approach resulted in a positive response from the Korean alumni. 

What lessons could the KAA share with other TC alumni associations in other countries?

I believe that there are two key factors for a successful alumni organization. First, it is important to have a charismatic leader with passion, organizational power, and financial capacity. Second, is the commitment and support of a few alumni members. Our fundraising campaign was not easy. It took many phone calls, meetings, and hard work. Behind our fundraising efforts were a few of our alumni directly calling every TC alumni in Korea, explaining the goal of the fund raising as well as the procedures of Pledge Fund. We learned that “more calls led to more donations.”

Does the KAA have any future plans you’d like to share with readers?
Yes, we are always thinking of ways to strengthen the TC alumni network in Korea, but one plan that comes to mind is our goal to create a “TC Academic Forum.” Similar to the “Columbia Forums” that have been successfully organized for five years in Korea, I believe that a TC Forum can help us facilitate discussion with experts in various fields and create more opportunities to unite the TC alumni in Korea. Additionally, I will continuously encourage the Korean alumni to have a constant interest in TC and make an effort to support our alma mater.

The Crowd Is Behind Us: Other Group Gifts that Support TC
The benefits of “crowd-sourcing,” as it’s known, are twofold: it pools the resources of multiple donors, and it brings those alumni involved closer together.

Increasingly, TC alumni, both in the United States and abroad are banding together to make scholarship gifts, many honoring favorite professors. Here are some of the most prominent efforts:

Maxine Greene Scholarship

Morton Deutsch Scholarship

Carroll F. Johnson Scholarship

Nutritional Ecology Endowed Scholarship Fund Honoring Professor Joan Gussow

A.M. Gentile Scholarship Fund in Motor Learning

Professor Jack & Edee Mezirow Endowed Scholarship Fund

The Harold J. Noah Endowed Scholarship Fund

Japan Scholarship Fund


If you want to give in honor of a beloved TC professor while also supporting current TC students, contact Linda Colquhoun, Director of Stewardship & Donor Relations, at 212 678-3679, or at Colquhoun@tc.columbia.edu 

To create a “crowd gift” in your nation, please contact Rosella Garcia, Senior Director of Alumni Relations, at 212 678-3004, or at rlg2144@tc.columbia.edu

 

(Published 6/3/2015)

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