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Academic Catalog 2017-2018

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Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design

Department of - Mathematics, Science & Technology

Contact Information

(212) 678-3344
(212) 678-8227
Professor Sandra Okita

Program Description

Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design (CMLTD) provides a cluster of degree programs for students who seek to develop leadership capacities in the use of information and communication technologies in education and society. The program applies to all subject areas and serves students, staff, and faculty members who share a commitment as educators to use digital technologies to improve education and society at all levels. Work through CMLTD should move simultaneously toward two poles of understanding and practice: toward a comprehensive understanding of the cultural and historical implications of new technologies for education and life and toward purposefully selecting and shaping the uses of new media in educational practice across and subject areas. 

CMLTD aims to prepare students to deal with both present and future implications of new media and to play a constructive role in shaping the educational response to innovations in information and communication technologies. The CMLTD Program encompasses the use of new media broadly in modern educational and public service arenas, including video, computer-based media, digital and non-digital game-based learning, and the role of communication and media in society from an historical and modern perspective.

CMLTD’s programs deal with the many ways in which material culture changes and shapes educational practice. Listed are current assumptions about the long-term effects that innovations in information, communication, and game technologies are having on education and culture. Work through CMLTD should lead faculty and students to study, criticize, develop, and extend propositions such as these:

  • With emerging intellectual demands and conditions, activities contributing to the creation of knowledge will increase in relative value, while those devoted solely to its dissemination will decrease.
  • When changes in information and communication technologies transform the ways people create, disseminate, and apply knowledge, deep changes in educational practices occur.
  • Educational institutions, including schools of education, will undergo prolonged change and significant transformation, occasioned by changes in the media of intellectual production.
  • Literacy practices will become more central to active participation in information networks and modern life.
  • Preservice education will need to focus more on the active integration of Information Communication Technologies, or ICTs, into pedagogy and research.
  • As digital information and communication technologies become more accessible, the separation of schools and higher education into two, largely distinct, educational cultures will markedly diminish.
  • Campuses will remain important foci of intellectual activity, while participation in them will become more flexible via networks supporting asynchronous, distributed involvement.
  • Specialists in education will need to work closely with scholars, scientists, and professionals to embed powerful learning experiences in digital technology for advancing knowledge.
  • Increasingly, educators will de-emphasize imparting a static stock of information and ideas and will instead seek to enable all people to contribute to the advancement of knowledge.
  • Demand for highly skilled educators will increase and preparing them will largely be a field-based engagement in situations where students interact with new knowledge resources.
  • Educational institutions, redefined, will increase in public importance and the educating professions will increasingly become high-tech and high-prestige professions.
  • Changes in information, games, and communication technologies will resuscitate the progressive movement in education, enabling it to be both broadly egalitarian and intellectually rigorous.

Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design aims to prepare students to deal with both present and future implications of new media and to play a constructive role in shaping the educational response to innovations in information and communication technologies, including mobile devices and augmented reality and cloud computing. Although these concerns are common to all program strands, each has distinct nuances with respect to methods and purpose:

  • Communication and Education relies primarily on social science inquiry to understand, interpret, and shape how information and communication technologies influence culture and education, including areas such as literacy and teacher education.
  • Computing in Education works with computer information systems to facilitate the effective extension of digital technologies into educational practice. This strand includes within it an online master's program that can be completed by students who live too far away to attend classes during the regular academic year.
  • Design & Development of Digital Games prepares students to design, develop, implement and evaluate digital games for learning and behavior in both formal and informal educational settings.
  • Instructional Technology and Media concentrates on the creation and application of innovative technologies, guided by a research tradition grounded in pedagogy and cognitive science, in order to make new media work as powerful tools for study and teaching.

Across the program strands, students and faculty members engage in research, development, theory, and application. All put a high priority on group work; fieldwork and internships; and planning, implementing, and completing innovative projects. Schools, computer companies, businesses, and other agencies are normally partners in projects, providing environments, materials, personnel, or opportunities for carrying them out. Based in CMLTD and with program affiliates, there is a wide range of internship and fieldwork opportunities for students. The CMLTD Program's multiple faculty-directed labs offer additional learning and research opportunities for students.

Communication and Education

The program in Communication and Education prepares students for various roles:

  • Teaching and research positions in higher education;
  • Working in schools using information and communication technologies to improve educational practice;
  • Conducting formative and evaluative research in the areas of educational media and information technologies, in and out of school settings and across subject areas;
  • Designing innovations in the use of new media for educational purposes; and
  • Working in business and government settings to design and implement corporate communication programs.

The program uses methods of the social sciences, encompassing both qualitative and quantitative approaches to the study of communication and education. It asks in particular how education and other social systems change under the impact of new media. Faculty members and students pursue three broad areas of inquiry, enabling them to:

  • Reflect on the historical effects of media and on the cultural uses of developments such as face-to-face speech, writing, printing, photography, film, radio, television, computers, and networked multimedia;
  • Use anthropological, linguistic, and other methods to study how the diverse forms of communication, literacy, information processing, and cognition condition educational practice;
  • Explore the effects of media, including games, MOOCs, and mobile platforms, on social relations, and develop strategies for using information and communications technologies to improve conditions of education and life.

In the course of completing a degree, students should expect to attend closely to both technical artifacts and human activity: that is, both to material systems of communication in which technologies are the primary interest and to interpersonal, direct communication dynamics in which unmediated face-to-face exchanges are the subject of inquiry. A major theme for continuous reflection should be the diverse ways in which the modes of communication condition meanings that are actually and potentially communicated—whether in face-to-face conversation, through distance learning technologies, or through societies and communities that are created in virtual worlds and on social media. 

Computing in Education - Online

Students who complete the online master’s program in Computing in Education take positions in:

  • Schools, as computer coordinators or teachers using advanced technologies in the classroom;
  • New media companies, developing software and multimedia applications for education, training, and gaming environments; and
  • Academic computer centers, corporate information services, and in education departments at the federal, state, and local levels, managing the integration of information and communication technologies into schools.

Design and Development of Digital Games

The M.A. program in Design and Development of Digital Games prepares students to design, develop, implement and evaluate digital games for learning and behavior in both formal and informal educational settings. This program is unique in that the curriculum is structured to examine game design from a combination of social, cultural, cognitive, and affective perspectives. Students who are studying the design and development of games for education as a concentration need the degree to reflect this area of study, which is not only optimal but necessary for their intended goals.

Digital games are fast becoming an integral part of professional education and training in education, medicine, business, and entertainment. A program on gaming with a focus specifically on learning meets the demands and interests of many students in the educational technology field. In the field of educational game design, the rapid changes in technologies are reshaping the ways we create, evaluate, reflect, reason, and learn, and the interdisciplinary nature of game design has led to greater creativity in teaching and learning, and opportunities to collaborate with industry.

Some of the required and suggested courses relate to the design of educational technology (of which games are a part), which are very relevant to design of games that target learning—what are often called educational games. Similarly, the development of educational (or other) games depends upon the ability to program such games, or, at very least, to have enough programming knowledge to be able to communicate appropriately with programmers who will develop games based on design specifications. Therefore, courses on game development, for example, complement the required programming course sequences that teach programming skills that can be applied to games.

Instructional Technology and Media

Students who have earned degrees in Instructional Technology and Media find positions in education, government, and industry. Some continue to work within formal education, as teachers, researchers, or administrators on the elementary, secondary, or college level. Others work in training and development departments in business or government agencies. An increasing number work as independent professionals in a variety of settings such as educational service, production consulting, and publishing. Still others have established themselves as researchers, designers, and producers for innovative multimedia projects.

The World Wide Web and related technologies have lowered the costs of distance learning programs greatly while increasing their flexibility. Through Instructional Technology and Media, faculty members and students join to develop the skills needed to make full use of the new opportunities in distance and distributed learning.

In recent years, students in the program have made four questions paramount:

  • Which emerging technologies hold greatest promise for enriching learning experiences throughout the educational enterprise?
  • What pedagogical strategies should designers embody in instructional materials, including those based on multimedia and those reflected in gaming environments?
  • How should educators deploy, manage, and evaluate information and communication technologies in classrooms for optimal educational effect?
  • What principles of design and practice should educators incorporate into distributed educational courses and programs?

Participants in all CMLTD program areas share a basic conviction that good design in educative matters starts with careful attention to the needs and characteristics of the individuals that the design will serve. For example, the ability to understand the individual through empirical research and empathic engagement will make the design of instructional technology not only technically proficient but educationally valuable as well. In all, this attention to the individual in society and culture defines the technological humanism we seek through all components of the programs in CMLTD—a humanism that combines the use of sophisticated technology with humane commitments for guiding purposes.

Special Degree Cohorts: 

Online Master’s Program in Computing in Education

The program in Computing in Education features coursework that is conducted online. The online program is designed to be available completely online, without an on-campus, face-to-face class experience. Participants take about ten courses online, which use video conferencing, discussion boards, and other means of online communication. Besides these courses, students have the opportunity to work on an independent project and possibly to attend three-day workshops at Teachers College in the summers. Students concentrate in Teaching and Learning with Technology or Technology Leadership. For more information, contact Dr. Jin Kuwata at kuwata@tc.columbia.edu or (212) 678-3344. 

Technology Specialist

This is a Master of Arts degree program leading to a New York State teaching license for “Technology Specialist K-12” candidates to become technology coordinators in schools. Student teaching and fieldwork are required. The program is available to those with or without initial teaching licenses who have some knowledge and experience in using technology in teaching. For further information, contact Dr. Ellen Meier at (212) 678-3829 or ebm15@columbia.edu. 

Technology Specialist - Track II

This is a Master of Arts degree program leading to an initial teaching certificate as a Technology Specialist K-12. It is intended for those already holding New York State certification in another content area. Program goals include preparing individuals to use technology as a set of tools with students, to work effectively with teachers to help them learn to use technology and design, and to implement curriculum where technology is well integrated. Completing the program requires 38 Teachers College credits, as well as 100 hours of fieldwork and 40 days of student teaching.

Degree Summary

The Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design area of study includes the following programs: Communication and Education; Computing in Education; Design and Development of Digital Games; Instructional Technology and Media; and Technology Specialist.

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION (TECM)

Degrees offered:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)
  • Master of Education (Ed.M.)
  • Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

COMPUTING IN EDUCATION (TECP)

Degree offered:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

COMPUTING IN EDUCATION-ONLINE (TECD)

Degree offered:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF DIGITAL GAMES (TEDG)

Degree offered:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND MEDIA (TEIT)

 Degrees offered:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)
  • Master of Education (Ed.M.)
  • Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST

Degrees offered:

TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST- K-12 Initial Certification (TETS-INIT)

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST- Track II: K-12 Initial Certification (TETT-INIT)

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please click the "Degrees" tab above

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please continue on to this program's "Degrees" section in this document

Degree Requirements

General Information

The college-wide degree requirements are stated in the Degree Requirements section of this bulletin. The following steps specific to Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design amplify the college-wide requirements and should serve as an aid for structuring an individualized program of study based on previous experience, professional goals, and interests. Enrolled students can obtain further information about requirements and the academic calendar from the program office at (212) 678-3344. Degrees represent advanced levels of mastery in rigorous scholarship and disciplined practice. In developing a program, students should find ways to meet the intrinsic demands of the field.


Master of Arts (32 points required)

To earn the Master of Arts (M.A.), students must satisfactorily complete 32 points of coursework (36 points for the Technology Specialist) and an integrative project. In CMLTD programs, the M.A. degree serves two main functions: a mark of entry-level professional qualifications in the fields covered and a grounding for further, more advanced specialization in the field.

Master of Arts (M.A.) programs are offered in Communication and Education, Computing in Education, and Instructional Technology and Media. In each of these M.A. programs, students must take coursework totaling at least 32 points. The following are required of all:

M.A. students:

Core Seminar (1 point)

  • MSTU 4000 Core seminar in communication, computing, and technology

Foundational Knowledge. At least three areas must be represented (9 points, minimum)

Cognitive Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4133 Cognition and computers

Social Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4020 Social and communicative aspects of the Internet
  • MSTU 4005 Equity, ethical, and social issues in educational technology

Cultural Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4028 Technology and culture
  • MSTU 5002 Culture, media, and education

Educational Practice and Design

  • MSTU 4050 Online schools and online schooling K-12
  • MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology
  • MSTU 4001 Technology and school change

Outside-the-Program Courses (6 points, minimum)

All students (at both master’s and doctoral levels) must complete a minimum of 6 points at Teachers College outside of the Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design Program (that is, courses with a prefix other than MSTU).

Integrative M.A. Project

The Integrative M.A. Project can be either an individual project or part of a larger project involving several students. For students completing only the M.A. degree, this project should be related to their career goals and should provide tangible evidence of their skills and strengths.

Note: No more than 3 points of “skills” courses may be counted toward the M.A., although students are encouraged to take additional skills courses that further their interests and goals. “Skills” courses include the following (this is a sample list):

  • MSTU 4029 Managing educational technology resources
  • Topical courses (MSTU 5199 and MSTU 5814) offered on the following topics: Database-driven website development, Adobe Director, 3-D modeling, Flash Communication Server, Adobe InDesign, digital video, GIS in curriculum, creating dynamic websites.

Additional Requirements for M.A. students in Communication and Education (TECM)

  •  MSTU 4016 The history of communication
  •  At least 9 points of additional MSTU courses
  •  Other courses chosen in consultation with an advisor       

Additional Requirements for M.A. students in Computing in Education and Technology Specialist (TECD, TETS-INIT, TETT-INIT)

  • At least 9 points of MSTU courses or other courses with the faculty advisor’s approval (MSTU 5031, Object-oriented Theory and Programming II is recommended). In particular, M.A. students in the Educational Technology Specialist Program or completing the Computing in Education degree through the completely online option have a slightly more constrained set of courses available to meet program requirements and should work closely with their respective advisor.
  • New York State Education Department (NYSED) has teacher certification requirements that are needed for program completion and graduation which are listed in the Office of Teacher Education section of the catalog.

Requirements for M.A. students in Design and Development of Digital Games (TEDG)

The M.A. program in Design and Development of Digital Games is a 32-33 point program that prepares students to design, develop, implement and evaluate digital games for learning and behavior in both formal and informal educational settings.

Core Seminar (1 point)

  • MSTU 4000 Core Seminar in Communication, Media, and Learning Technologies Design (1 point)

Required Core Courses (9 points). This requirement can be met by taking any three of the following courses.

  • MSTU 4020 Social and Communicative Aspects of ICTs (3 points) and/or
  • MSTU 4005 Equity, Ethics and Social Issues (3 points) and/or
  • MSTU 4088 Introduction to Educational Technology & the Learning Sciences (3 points) and/or
  • MSTU 4083 Instructional Design of Educational Technology (3 points).

Requirements in the Major area (15 points) can be met by taking the following courses.

  • Two programming courses.
    • Object-Oriented programming sequence MSTU 4031 Object-Oriented Theory and Programming I (3 points) and MSTU 5031 Object-Oriented Theory and Programming II (3 points)

            or

  • Two course Interactive Media programming sequence MSTU 5003 Theory and Programming-Interactive Media I (3 points) and MSTU 5013 Theory and Programming: Interactive Media II (3 points).
  • MSTU 4039 Video Games in Education (3 points)
  • MSTU 5015 Research/Programming in Serious Games (3 points)
  • MSTU 6000 Advanced Designing of Educational Games (3 points)

Integrative Masters Project

  • All M.A. students must complete an Integrative Masters Project. The project must be approved by each student’s academic advisor. This project should be related to their career goals, and should provide tangible evidence of their skills and strengths.

Breadth Requirement (7 points)

  • As a breadth requirement, students at Teachers College, Columbia University must complete a minimum of three courses, each for at least two credits, at Teachers College and outside the Communication, Media, and Learning Technologies Design Program (that is, courses with a prefix other than MSTU).

Additional Requirements for M.A. students in Instructional Technology and Media (TEIT)

  • MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology (counts toward the Foundational Knowledge area)
  • Two programming courses. This requirement can be met by taking the two-course Object-Oriented programming sequence, the two-course Interactive Media programming sequence, or one course from each sequence.           
  • At least 6 points of additional MSTU courses
  • Other courses chosen in consultation with an advisor 

Candidates for the M.A. degree are expected to culminate their work with an integrative project. Such a project might be a review essay in which they give a thorough, well-written summation of current research and development work in an area of their choice within the broad field of Information and Communications Technologies in Education or a multi-media instructional application. In addition, because experientially-grounded learning is invaluable preparation for professional practice, students are strongly advised to take fieldwork or internships as an integral part of their master’s program.


Master of Education (60 points required) (60 points)

An Ed.M. degree represents roughly the equivalent of two years of full-time study. It serves for some to mark progress toward a doctorate and for others to initiate intermediate professional qualifications for students who have previously completed a master’s degree at Teachers College or another institution. Up to 30 points of graduate credit earned elsewhere may be counted toward the minimum 60-point requirement. Ed.M. candidates who have completed an M.A. in CMLTD or an equivalent program should select further courses to broaden and deepen their mastery of the field. Those who are transferring a significant number of points from a different specialty toward the Ed.M. should include a selection of CMLTD core program courses in their remaining coursework. In addition to completing the minimum course requirements and developing a skill specialization, candidates for the Ed.M. degree culminate their work through a research or development project submitted to the faculty. 

Master of Education (Ed.M.) programs are offered in Communication and Instructional Technology and Media. In each of these Ed.M. programs, students must take coursework totaling at least 60 points. The following are required of all Ed.M. students:

Core Seminar (1 point)

  • MSTU 4000 Core seminar in communication, computing, and technology

Foundational Knowledge. At least three areas must be represented (9 points, minimum)

Cognitive Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4133 Cognition and computers

Social Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4020 Social and communicative aspects of the Internet 
  • MSTU 4005 Equity, ethical, and social issues in educational technology

Cultural Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4028 Technology and culture
  • MSTU 5002 Culture, media, and education

Educational Practice and Design

  • MSTU 4050 Online schools and online schooling K-12
  • MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology
  • MSTU 4001 Technology and school change

Research Methods and Design (3 points)

Students must complete one research method or research design course offered either in or outside the CMLTD program. Suggested courses include the following:

  • HUDM 4122 Probability and statistical inference
  • ITSF 5000 Methods of inquiry: Ethnography and paricipant observation
  • MSTU 5025 Researching technology in educational environments
  • MSTU 5001 Assessing the impact of technology in schools

All students must complete a minimum of 6 points at Teachers College outside of the Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design Program (that is, courses with a prefix other than MSTU). Suggested: HUDM 4120 Basic concepts in statistics; ITSF 5000 Methods of inquiry-Ethnography and participant observation; and/or other basic research/inquiry courses without an MSTU prefix.

Integrative Ed.M. Project

The Integrative Ed.M. Project is a research or development project that should result from independent effort equivalent to that of a 3-point course. Like the M.A. integrative project, it should provide tangible evidence of a student’s skills and strengths and should represent the student’s interests, as well as display the specialized skills developed for the degree.

Note: No more than 6 points of “skills” courses may be counted toward the Ed.M., although students are encouraged to take additional skills courses that further their interests and goals. “Skills” courses include the following (this is a sample list):

  • MSTU 4029 Managing educational technology resources
  • Topical courses (MSTU 5199 and MSTU 5814) offered on the following topics: Database-driven website development, Adobe Director, 3-D modeling, Flash Communication Server, Adobe InDesign, digital video, GIS in curriculum, and creating dynamic websites.

Additional Requirements for Ed.M. students in Communication and Education (TECM)

  • MSTU 4016 The history of communication
  • MSTU 5606 Readings in communication theory and social thought I
  • At least 15 points of additional MSTU courses
  • Other courses chosen in consultation with an advisor

Additional Requirements for Ed.M. students in Instructional Technology and Media (TEIT)

  • MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology (counts toward the Foundational Knowledge area)
  • Two programming courses. This requirement can be met by taking the two-course Object-Oriented programming sequence, the two-course Interactive Media programming sequence, or one course from each sequence.
  • At least 15 points of additional MSTU courses
  • Other courses chosen in consultation with an advisor 

Students accepted for a doctoral program should earn the Ed.M. as an integral part of their doctoral work. However, the Ed.M. can be far more than a stepping stone to a doctorate. It allows for great flexibility, and students can use it to lay a strong foundation for significant positions of leadership that demand high levels of skill but do not require doctoral-level academic certification. For instance, students can put together a very effective 60-point program dealing with “school media for curriculum innovation.” In a similar way, one can develop a very strong grounding in educational software development through the Ed.M. degree. It can serve many purposes. One needs to think through one’s aspirations and use the scope of the Ed.M. program to build academic and experiential foundations in accordance with one’s achievement goals.


Doctor of Education

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree candidates should read Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education, which can be obtained from the Teachers College Office of Doctoral Studies. It states the formal requirements for the degree and lays out the steps leading to it. Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design requirements provide experiences through basic courses, skill concentrations, and independent projects, all leading to the certification examination and the dissertation. These experiences have been designed to ensure that students develop skills in one or more modes of inquiry; contribute professionally to the field through conferences, presentations, or publications; and participate actively in CMLTD functions outside of class work.

Programs are planned individually in consultation with a faculty advisor. Doctoral candidates should develop a systematic plan for study early in their program, encouraging sustained consideration of a dissertation area and tailoring course selection to support dissertation work. The doctorate represents the highest level of educational preparation achievable in the field. To complete it well, students should meet all requirements in an intellectual spirit consonant with this status. Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) programs are offered in both Communication and in Instructional Technology and Media. In each of these Ed.D. programs, students must take coursework totaling at least 90 points. The following are required of all Ed.D. students:

Core Seminar and Doctoral Colloquium (3 points)

One-point registration for MSTU 4000. Ed.D. students must take MSTU 6600 for a total of two points after taking MSTU 4000. After two points of registration in MSTU 6600, students must register for MSTU 6600 for zero points each semester until graduation.

Foundational Knowledge

All four areas must be represented (12 points, minimum).

Cognitive Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4133 Cognition and computers  

Social Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4020 Social and communicative aspects of the Internet  
  • MSTU 4005 Equity, ethical, and social issues in educational technology

Cultural Issues and Technology

  • MSTU 4028 Technology and culture
  • MSTU 5002 Culture, media, and education

Educational Practice and Design

  • MSTU 4050 Online schools and online schooling K-12
  • MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology  
  • MSTU 4001 Technology and school change

Research Methods and Design (12 points, minimum)

Introductory Quantitative Methods Course (3 points)

  • HUDM 4122 Probability and statistical inference

Note: HUDM 4120 Basic concepts in statistics does not meet this requirement.

Introductory Qualitative Methods Course, taken from the following
or similar (3 points):

  • C&T 5502 Introduction to qualitative research in curriculum and teaching  
  • ITSF 5000 Methods of inquiry: Ethnography and participant observation
  • ITSF 5001 Ethnography and participant observation: Fieldwork, analysis, reporting

Research/Research Design Applied to Technology (3 points)

  • MSTU 5001 Assessing the impact of technology in schools
  • MSTU 5025 Research technology in educational environment

Additional, non-introductory quantitative, qualitative, or other non-introductory research methodology class (3 points).

The following are examples of what is available. Students should familiarize themselves with the full range of courses that are offered and choose a class that is relevant to their dissertation work, in consultation with their faculty advisor.

  • A&HE 6151 Narrative research in English education
  • A&HL 4104 Discourse analysis
  • HUDM 5122 Applied regression analysis
  • HUDM 5123 Linear models and experimental design
  • ORL 6500 Qualitative research methods in organizations: Design and data collection
  • ORL 6501 Qualitative research methods in organizations: Data analysis and reporting  

Outside-the-Program Courses (6 points, minimum)

All students (at both master’s and doctoral levels) must complete a minimum of three courses, each for at least 2 credits, at Teachers College outside of the Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design Program (that is, courses with a prefix other than MSTU).

Complete the doctoral certification process (see explanation later in this section).

Successfully propose, complete, and defend the doctoral dissertation.

  • Register for the Dissertation Seminar (MSTU 7501 or 7503, 1 point) when presenting the Dissertation Proposal. See also the regulations for MSTU 8900 and the section in the Academic Catalog on continuous registration.

Note: No more than 6 points of “skills” courses may be counted toward the Ed.D., although students are encouraged to take additional skills courses that further their interests and goals. “Skills” courses include the following (this is a sample list):

  • MSTU 4029 Managing educational technology resources
  • Topical courses (MSTU 5199 and MSTU 5814) offered on the following topics: Database-driven website development, Adobe Director, 3-D modeling, Flash Communication Server, Adobe InDesign, digital video, GIS in curriculum, and creating dynamic websites.

Additional Requirements for Ed.D. students in Communication (TECM)

  • MSTU 4016 The history of communication
  • MSTU 4031 Object-oriented theory and programming I
  • MSTU 5606 Readings in communication theory and social thought
  • At least 15 points of MSTU courses
  • Other courses chosen in consultation with an advisor

Additional Requirements for Ed.D. students in Instructional Technology and Media (TEIT)

  • MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology (counts toward the Foundational Knowledge area)
  • Two programming courses. This requirement can be met by taking the two-course Object-Oriented programming sequence, the two-course Interactive Media programming sequence, or one course from each sequence.
  • At least 15 points of MSTU courses
  • Other courses chosen in consultation with an advisor

Doctoral Certification Process

The Doctoral Certification Process for CMLTD students has three steps. Students’ names are not sent forward to the Office of Doctoral Studies to be certified until all three of the following requirements have been successfully completed.

1. An Integrative Question that the student answers in writing during the regular certification examination session that the Office of Doctoral Studies schedules each semester.

This question is about some currently prominent educational technology topic that students answer by pulling material from CMLTD courses and course-related as well as independent readings. The best way to prepare for this question is to think of currently important educational technology topics related to your area of interest and try to think of how you would integrate content covered in different courses to address these topics. Please note: (a) CMLTD’s certification examination is offered in the morning session of the exam day; there is no CMLTD afternoon session. (b) The written integrative question part of the certification process is not available during the summer.

2. A Literature Review or critical assessment of scholarship (a paper of around 30 pages, double-spaced) related to what is planned for the dissertation. This gives a head start on the literature review section of the dissertation. This paper is graded by the faculty advisor. Approved papers may be posted and generally available to others for future reference.

3. A Certification Project that would be a smaller scale version of what might be done in the dissertation or a project or pilot study that leads to the dissertation project. This certification project has three steps:

    a. Write a short proposal (five or fewer double spaced pages) of the planned project, which the faculty advisor must approve. The nature of the project would vary depending on the student’s interests;

    b. Complete the project;

    c. Write a project report (around 30 pages), which is graded by the advisor.

When the faculty advisor verifies that the student has completed the Integrative Question portion, the Literature Review paper, and the Certification Project, the student is recommended for certification. The CMLTD program has designed its certification requirements to help prepare students for work on their dissertations and to document that preparedness. To receive full certification for doctoral work, students must also meet certain college-wide requirements, as explained in the Degree Requirements section of this bulletin.

Policies on the Written Examination Portion of the CMLTD Certification Process

There are three hours available to write a response to one question. There is no choice of question. The question is constructed broadly so that it can be addressed by people from different perspectives and program strands within CMLTD. CMLTD students may bring resources into the examination (books, notes, etc.), but these cannot include electronic items on, for example, flash drives. While references to people and articles are expected in the body of the response and work must not be mischaracterized, there is no need to present a formal reference list at the end of the response or to be accurate on every date for each citation. Past questions are available on the certification examination section of the StudyPlace wiki (www.studyplace.org; search for “certification exam”).

Students can attempt to successfully complete the written response portion of the certification process no more than two times.

Evaluation Procedures

Each response is evaluated by the CMLTD faculty, who meet as a group to read students’ examinations. Students’ names are removed from their examinations and the examinations are then circulated during the meeting of the faculty. The examination is read and discussed and a decision is made about its grade.

Basic Evaluation Criteria

All responses are evaluated with regard to the following four questions:

1) Does the response address the question asked?

2) Does the response integrate material (using several references and sources) from each of three different core courses or from various perspectives or theories?

3) Does the response present a coherent and meaningful discussion?

4) Is the response substantive enough to convince the reader that the student has an advanced, graduate-level grasp of the field?


Application Information

Master's (M.A. and Ed.M.) applicants are reviewed on an ongoing basis. For scholarship awards, applicants who meet the early deadlines receive preference (January 15 for summer and fall and November 1 for spring) with the most aid going to doctoral students who meet the Ed.D. January 2 early deadline. All applicants should consult the Admissions Office (www.tc.columbia.edu/admissions/) for additional application information.

Doctoral (Ed.D.) applicants are required to submit a writing sample, prior transcripts, letters of recommendation, a personal statement, and results from the GRE General Test (a TOEFL test score is required of international students). They are also strongly encouraged to arrange for an interview. In making financial aid decisions, CMLTD reviews doctoral applications once a year in late February with the expectation that doctoral students will start during summer or fall sessions. Consequently, doctoral candidates are encouraged to meet the January 2 early deadline. There is no guarantee of progression from a master's program to a doctoral program within CMLTD. In addition to academic criteria, CMLTD takes into account the relevance of its resources to a prospective student’s professional goals as described in the personal statement when making admission decisions.

Financial Aid

In addition to college-wide financial aid opportunities and student services, the CMLTD faculty members are committed to generating an increasing range of opportunities for remunerative work that will integrate well into our program of studies. Essentially, such opportunities are of three types: assistantships in research and development projects; instructorships to teach basic courses in the field; and internships in industry, government, and education. The precise opportunities that exist in these areas continually change as projects here and elsewhere begin, proceed, and culminate. To find out more about these opportunities, students should consult individual faculty.

Faculty List

Faculty

Lecturers

Visiting Faculty

Adjunct

Full-Time Instructors

Instructors

Advisor
Lecturer
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Director of Academic Administration
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Associate Professor
Assistant Professor of Communication, Media and Learning Technologies Design
Professor of Education
Lecturer
Assistant Professor of Communication, Media, and Learning Technologies Design
Director, Research and Evaluation
Associate Professor of Practice
Associate Professor of Technology and Education
Guest Speaker
Part-Time Instructor
Professor of Technology & Education
Part Time Instructor

For up to date information about course offerings including faculty information, please visit the online course schedule.

Course List

MSTU 4000 Core seminar in communication, computing, and technology

Required for incoming students. Meets with MSTU 6600. Discussion of critical issues; reading of key works; development of project in Communication, Media, and Learning Technologies Design; presentation of work in progress; conversations with leaders in the field.

MSTU 4001 Technology and school change

Explores how technology is currently used in our schools and how technology can be used more effectively as a catalyst for larger school reform efforts. Participants will examine some of the institutional forces shaping the integration of technology into our schools and some of the institutional change theories that influence these forces to address the question: What can technology contribute to school improvement and how can we facilitate those changes?

MSTU 4005 Equity, ethical and social issues in educational technology

Addresses a wide range of issues concerning equity and access, including differential gender, racial, and ethnic uses of computers. Examines legal and ethical issues in students' use of technology with an emphasis on improving access and use of technology for all students.

MSTU 4010 Theories of communication

A broad, multidisciplinary survey of contemporary perspectives on communication. Topics include: definitions, models and theories of information processing, history of media change, cross-cultural communication, interpersonal communication, and the uses and effects of mass media.

MSTU 4012 Video as art: An exploration

This course will take an aesthetic approach to the exploration of emerging forms of video, including anime, music videos, do-it-yourself video, video sharing websites, and more. Students will be engaged in video production throughout the course.

MSTU 4016 The history of communication

A comprehensive survey of the history of communication, tracing the development of the dominant modes of transmitting knowledge from speaking to writing, from printing to the electronic media.

MSTU 4020 Social and Communicative Aspects of the Internet

Examines social communicative practices as synergistic; how space, time, and social networks evolve and interact; and what this implies for the design and use of technology.

MSTU 4022 Telecommunications, distance learning, and collaborative interchange

Introduction to the use and educational implications of telecommunications, distance learning, and collaborative interchange using telecommunications, particularly the Internet and the World Wide Web.

MSTU 4023 Cinema as cross-cultural communication

Analyzes how films explore culture. Discussion of the film as well as the cultural messages portrayed.

MSTU 4024 Television and the Development Of Youth

This course brings a sociocultural lens to issues related to youth (including children and adolescents) and the evolving terrain of television. Students will review research and theories and experiment with media production in this course. No prior media production experience is necessary.

MSTU 4028 Technology and Culture

This course examines the relationship between technology, culture and society, with a particular emphasis on new and emerging media. Course readings include sources both popular and academic, theoretical and empirical, contemporary and non-contemporary, optimistic and skeptical, thus representing a wide variety of perspectives regarding the relationship between technology and culture.

MSTU 4029 Managing educational technology resources

For educators involved in the planning, implementation, and maintenance at the building/campus level. Students learn how to apply educational technology to achieve educational objectives and to manage interpersonal relations in the process.

MSTU 4031 Object-oriented theory and programming I

Communicating with computers and humans through programming language in an object oriented style. Uses Java to formalize the concepts behind software structure and construct representative applications.

MSTU 4036 Hypermedia and education

Introduction to hypermedia products and programming and their role in education. Four-point registration is for hypermedia programming lab.

MSTU 4037 Computers and the uses of information in education

This course examines how computers can structure and present information, evaluates current educational software that uses information, and considers the design of software for integrating information applications into education. Prerequisite: MSTU 4030 or equivalent computer experience.

MSTU 4039 Video games in education

Provides students with tools they will need to understand, analyze, and build games. Focus is on gaining an understanding of rules, interactivity, play, social interaction, and all other factors that go into making an innovative and fun game. Primary focus is on the basic language of games: game play and game design. Course also addresses games from an educational perspective.

MSTU 4040 Mobile learning

This course explores how one can utilize the mobile phone for learning and the factors to consider maximizing mobile learning.  Roughly half of the world’s population already has some type of mobile phone, making it the most wide spread technology and most common electronic device in the world (Reuters 2007).  Un-tapping this ubiquitous technology creates a wide array of educational possibilities.  In this course, you will learn (1) about the different mobile phone technologies; (2) how to design learning activities for mobile phones; (3) pedagogical and theoretical frameworks for mobile learning.  The course will provide you with a better understanding of learning strategies that can be used on and via mobile phones.

MSTU 4049 Technologies and literacies

An examination of the relationship between computers and the writing process. The course explores the effect of electronic text on traditional notions of text, literacy, and communication. Assumes no computing experience.

MSTU 4050 Online schools and online schooling K-12

This course examines the different models of the K-12 virtual school and virtual schooling experience in the United States and internationally.

MSTU 4052 Computers, problem solving, and cooperative learning

Considers how computers may be used to promote cooperative learning in problem solving for students throughout the curriculum, focusing on the use of simulations, databases, programming, and problem solving software. Course content will include active participation in cooperative learning using computers as well as background work in educational theory as it relates to problem solving and cooperative learning.

MSTU 4083 Instructional design of educational technology

The nature of instructional technology. Systems approaches to planning, managing, and evaluating instructional processes and materials. Emphasis is on instructional design.

MSTU 4133 Cognition and Computers

This course explores ideas about cognition and knowledge representation and how they relate to the use of computers in instruction. Students select a subject area, learn to represent knowledge from it so that it can be implemented in a computer instructional system, and use the knowledge representation to characterize the cognitive prerequisites and consequences of learning to use computers.

MSTU 4134 Cognition and Computers lab

Permission required. Corequisite: MSTU 4133.

MSTU 4700 Student teaching practicum in educational technology

The Technology Specialists student practicum supports the school practicum experiences through readings and weekly classes focused on key issues: addressing diversity, classroom project design, technology integration, and professional development. The Practicum provides an opportunity to reflect on classroom experiences, to design technology-integrated projects, and to match the unique skills of each candidate with the unique demands of each placement.

MSTU 5000 Possibility of virtual worlds

Explores possibilities of virtual worlds for gaming and education. Through readings and theoretical discussions of identity construction, positioning, and social aspects of virtual and traditional communities, participants explore how virtual environments may support teaching and learning and how virtual communities are affecting people's lives.

MSTU 5001 Assessing the impact of technology in our schools
Examines the evidence of effectiveness of technology in our schools. Through an examination of key concerns in the technology research literature, we will address essential questions for understanding the impact of technology.
MSTU 5002 Culture, media and education

In this course, we consider the cultural implications of media and technologies for education by pairing theoretical frameworks with case studies and other examples of empirical research.

MSTU 5003 Theory and programming of interactive media: Part 1

This course introduces the fundamentals of design and development for interactive front-end web applications. Students are provided with tools and theoretical knowledge for understanding and analyzing specific learning problems in order to their develop ideas into multimodal web-based learning experiences, through hands-on projects. UX theory and methods are integrated to ensure that students emerge as authors of well-designed and documented web artifacts. This course lays the foundation for the computational and design thinking necessary to conceive, plan, and build learning technologies. This course is a prerequisite for Part II.

MSTU 5004 Digital geographies and virtual spaces
Explore newly-developed spaces and consider how the evolving relationship between new technologies and new modes of communication and literacy are making these spaces available.
MSTU 5005 Case-based teaching in electronic environments

Focuses on theory related to designing, developing, and using multimedia case methodology in education. Students are encouraged to examine educational case methodology within their interest area.

MSTU 5006 Database-driven website development

Explores and provides a working knowledge of the technical and theoretical underpinnings of web application development by examining the layers of database construction, web programming, and user interface design.

MSTU 5010 Boundaries and theories of learning with technological artifacts

This course will explore learning partnerships that take place between people and technological artifacts (robots, agent-avatars). The course examines social components of technological artifacts, introduces current research findings on learning in social interactions with such artifacts, and links these to cognitive factors that influence learning, knowledge construction, design, and assessment. Emphasis will be placed on the learning effect on the human partner. Small groups of students will work on a project throughout the semester.

MSTU 5013 Theory and programming of interactive media: Part II

This course is the second-level course in a sequence beginning with MSTU 5003. Students acquire advanced theoretical and technical knowledge needed to design and develop interactive web-based instructional applications grounded firmly in learning theory and design principles. The course is project-based whereby students delve into specific learning research to produce a theoretical model and well-aligned technical solutions. While the introductory course focuses on basic theory and technical implementation of instructional interactive media, Part II dives deeper into all aspects of the topic.

MSTU 5015 Research/programming in serious games

This seminar-based course features an in-depth exploration of a range of research topics related to games in education, especially tailored for students currently involved in game-based research or those who are interested in pursuing a research project in the area. It provides a forum for students to present, receive feedback, and make progress on their current research. It also permits students with an interest in Serious Games to launch a research project of their own. Experience with game design and programming skills are highly recommended.

MSTU 5020 Computer-mediated communication

Analyzes characteristics of such computer-mediated communication systems as networked multimedia, electronic mail, bulletin boards, and computer conferencing and situates these systems in the context of the emerging national information infrastructure. Students will participate in online communication systems.

MSTU 5025 Researching technology in educational environments

This course is designed as an overview of research designs and methodologies for students who are interested in researching the uses of technology in education, including both face-to-face and online/distance learning environments. The course looks at the theoretical bases for, and practical implementation of, different quantitative and qualitative research approaches, methodologies, and instruments. It is structured around a series of hands-on case studies in which students design research studies, revise existing instruments, and analyze previously collected data for technology-related projects in classrooms and online. Students are encouraged, but not required, to come with a research project in mind.

MSTU 5029 Technology leadership and schools

This course identifies appropriate theoretical frameworks and recent findings from educational technology research to inform relevant policy and practice concerns, including equity considerations.  Will also explore some classic texts on organizations, along with emerging literature on leadership theory and practice and recent technology research. The class will develop case studies to illustrate key aspects of leadership challenges related to technology integration.

MSTU 5030 Intelligent computer-assisted instruction

Prerequisite: MSTU 4133. Participants study ideas about the representation of knowledge, models of the learner, and teaching strategies that have been developed in artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology, as well as develop and test intelligent computer-assisted instruction materials for topics of interest.

MSTU 5031 Object-Oriented Theory of Programming II

Prerequisite: MSTU 4031 or a solid basic knowledge of programming. Applies programming to significant problems using Java or C++ to construct salient applications.

MSTU 5035 Technology and Metacognition

This course explores how theories of learning, development, and cognition can shape the design of instruction. Readings cover a range of instructional theories and highlight the underlying influences of those theories. Although the course includes a brief survey of historical trends in the field, the primary course focus is on current and emerging theories of instruction, such as distributed and dynamical views of cognition and learning. Students are encouraged to present and discuss their research interests and projects as they relate to the focus of the course.

MSTU 5191 Educational Video Production I

Practical studio and field production experience of educational video programs with special concern for realizing educational purposes through directing, scripting, staging, camera operation, lighting, and sound design.

MSTU 5515 New media teaching and learning

Permission required. This course provides students with experience in the development of new media projects and a forum for discussing the implications for new media on education, particularly in higher education. The course involves a fieldwork component.

MSTU 5555 Technology and the emergence of a global curriculum

This course deals with the impact of technology on human society over the ages, how technology in particular is shaped by, and in turn shapes, the vision informing a specific culture and its curriculum, and how the global sharing of technology is inexorably contributing to the emergence of a common global curriculum. Uses its own website, www.tc.columbia.edu/~global.

MSTU 5606 Readings in communication theory and social thought I

The aim of this course is to introduce students to foundational works and influential ideas in the study of communication and culture. Topics include semiotics, Marxism, feminist theory, cultural analysis, global communication frameworks, and other topics relevant to students enrolled in the class. We will apply these theoretical tools to examine a wide range of communication practices, popular media and sites of cultural expression.

MSTU 5814 Work conference

Occasional brief conferences convened by Communication, Media, and Learning Technologies Design on subjects of special interest.

MSTU 6000 Advanced designing educational games

This course serves as an intensive workshop for designing and producing educational games as well as a scholarly opportunity for students interested in the advanced study of games.

MSTU 6532 Seminar in cognitive science

 

MSTU 6600 Colloquium in Communication, Computing, and Technology in Education

Continuous participation required of certified doctoral students. Discussion of critical issues, reading of key works, formal proposal of dissertation topics, presentation of work in progress, and conversations with leaders in the field.

MSTU 7501 Dissertation seminar
Permission required. Presentation of dissertation proposal for approval by a sponsoring committee. Student arranges one two-hour meeting with his or her sponsoring committee.
MSTU 8900 Dissertation advisement
Advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. See section in this bulletin on Continuous Registration for Ed.D. degree.