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Academic Catalog 2017-2018

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Social-Organizational Psychology

Department of - Organization & Leadership

Contact Information

(212) 678-8109
(212) 678-8253
Dr. Elissa Perry

Program Description

The Program in Social-Organizational Psychology is concerned with the various contexts (interpersonal, group, inter-group, and inter-organizational) in which human behavior occurs; the ways in which groups of individuals interact and influence these contexts; and how these interactions can be understood, studied, and modified through theory, research, and various types of interventions.

Three programs are offered: a master’s program in organizational psychology, an executive master’s program in organizational psychology with a specialization in change leadership, and a doctoral program. A terminal Master of Arts degree in Psychology: Organizational is awarded upon successful completion of 45 points and passing the comprehensive examination, or in the case of the executive MA program, a capstone project. The Ph.D. degree is awarded upon completion of at least 75 points of planned and sequential study, qualifying papers, and a dissertation.

The programs provide advanced training in the concepts, research methods, and applications of social-organizational psychology. They are designed to prepare students to engage in research, consultation, and teaching in educational, business, governmental, and community organizations. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of basic concepts and methods applicable to diverse institutional and organizational contexts.

With the help of a faculty advisor, students select courses in a generalist track, or, in their area of specialization, with consideration given to their academic backgrounds, work experiences, and career objectives. These tracks are supplemented by courses offered through other programs and departments at Teachers College and Columbia University.

In addition, an Advanced Certificate in Cooperation and Conflict Resolution approved by the New York State Education Department is also offered to students in the M.A./Ph.D. programs. Students interested in receiving the certificate must complete a sequence of five courses and one semester of internship. Students who opt for the Advanced Certificate must complete an application for admission with the Office of Admission. Students in the M.A./Ph.D. program who wish to take their electives within the area of conflict resolution but who do not wish to receive the Advanced Certificate may register for courses without completing an application.

Master of Arts in Organizational Psychology (ORGM)

The 45‐point M.A. program educates students to be experts in organization effectiveness, culture and change, team development and team building, conflict resolution, assessment and coaching, leadership, and more, through emphasizing the rigorous scientific study of the practical problems facing people in organizations today, in service of a more just society.

Students who join the M.A. program craft their course of study according to their backgrounds, interests, and goals along with their adviser. Academic, career and personal advising is plentiful and accessibility to meetings with the Program Director and the Program Adviser is a key source of support for M.A. students. Further, all social-organizational psychology program faculty are available for advising and meet with students regularly to discuss research, practice, and myriad other issues related to the program and the field, providing an additional resource to students for academic and career development.

Upon completing the M.A. program, students are prepared to engage in a broad range of professional employment opportunities. Our graduates are often employed in positions typically found within the organization development function of middle or large-size organizations including human resources, people development, human capital, talent management, and the like. These include positions in organization development and consultation, human resource development and strategy, organizational effectiveness, human capital research, employee relations, mediation and conflict resolution, global learning, and career development and counseling among others. 

Graduates of the master’s program may apply for admission to the doctoral program in Social-Organizational Psychology. However, successful performance in the M.A. program does not in and of itself guarantee admission. Students who apply become part of the applicant pool for that year, and their qualifications are evaluated with equal standing along with the other applicants.

Executive Masters Program in Organizational Psychology with a specialization in Change Leadership (ORGX)

Developed specifically for experienced working professionals, the Executive Master's Program in Change Leadership is designed to help individuals and organizations increase their capacity for initiating, managing, and sustaining workplace change efforts in increasingly complex and global environments. Focusing on the application of both psychological and business principles to relevant real-world organizational challenges, the program emphasizes individual, team, and organizational learning and transformation through rigorous training in and experience with applied research, reflective practice, and the use of theoretical models. Executives enter the program each summer in small cohorts of 16-24 students and are trained by faculty experts in organization change and consultation using a range of innovative adult learning technologies and various cultural immersion and residential experiences in and around the New York City metropolitan area. The program is delivered in four one-week modules extending over one year and includes pre-work, post-work, and guided independent study/action research as part of the formal program requirements. Executives will learn about change-related topics at the societal, organizational, group, and individual levels and will be asked to integrate their own learning and professional development through various opportunities for practice and reflection. The program culminates in a 45-credit Master of Arts Degree in Organizational Psychology, with a specialization in Change Leadership.

For a more comprehensive description of the Executive Masters Program in Change Leadership, please visit www.tc.edu/leadchange.

Doctor of Philosophy in Organizational Psychology (ORGD)

The doctoral program in Social-Organizational Psychology follows a scientist-practitioner model. It is designed for full-time graduate students who desire fundamental education and skill development in the science and application of psychology to social and organizational situations and activities. Our goal is to provide an environment that is conducive to the development of scientist-practitioners who are prepared to assume the diverse responsibilities of positions at research universities, leading businesses, and professional service firms. Through coursework, field projects with organizations, and close working relationships with faculty members and fellow graduate students, doctoral students are provided with advanced training in the theoretical concepts, research methods, and applications of social-organizational psychology. Students gain critical knowledge and skills that encompass both research and practice.

Some unique aspects of the program include:

  • The integration of both social and organizational psychology;
  • A theoretical, research, and applied focus on understanding multiple levels of organizational functioning from individuals to groups to organizations as a whole and the dynamic interaction among these levels;
  • A breadth of coverage including human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational change, leadership, conflict and negotiation, coaching, diversity, organizational demography, motivation, power and authority, group processes, and organizational dynamics;
  • An emphasis on both quantitative and qualitative research methods to address organizational issues;
  • Opportunities to engage in basic research, applied research, and organizational consulting and application activities; and
  • Faculty members who are trained in a broad array of disciplines including social psychology, counseling psychology, industrial-organizational psychology, organizational behavior, and business management, and all of whom apply their respective disciplines to social-organizational psychology issues.

Degree Summary

PSYCHOLOGY: ORGANIZATIONAL (ORGM)

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

PSYCHOLOGY: ORGANIZATIONAL (EXECUTIVE MASTERS) (ORGX)

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

SOCIAL-ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (ORGD)

  • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please click the "Degrees" tab above

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please continue on to this program's "Degrees" section in this document

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements: M.A. Program

MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (ORGM)

The program provides courses at Teachers College, and students may take relevant courses at Columbia University, particularly the Graduate School of Business, the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), the School of Social Work, and the Mailman School of Public Health among others. There is one major for the M.A. degree entitled Psychology: Organizational.

The curriculum is comprised of major courses consisting of four required core level I courses, five required advanced core level II courses, other general elective courses (usually ORLJ but can be outside ORLJ or at other Columbia schools) and 6 credits of breadth courses, which are Teachers College, non-ORLJ courses, in a related field.  

Courses available at the Graduate School of Business, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, School of International and Public Affairs, Social Work, and in other graduate programs at Columbia University may be taken as a general elective course (courses not taken at Teachers College may not count as a breadth course). Students must consult with an advisor to select courses outside of Teachers College that may satisfy the elective requirements. An effort is made to assist students in developing a program of study that will best meet their personal career interests and objectives.

Core Required Courses: Level I

The following four courses are required for all candidates.

  • ORLJ 4002 Functions of organizations (3)
  • ORLJ 4005 Organizational psychology (3)
  • ORLJ 4009 Understanding behavioral research (3)
  • ORLJ 5003 Human resource management (3)

Advanced Core Required Courses: Level II

The three courses immediately below are required for all candidates.  In addition, candidates must choose one of the application courses and one of the advanced theory courses (listed further down), for a total of five courses required to satisfy the advanced core level II:

  • ORL 5362 Group dynamics: A systems perspective (3)
  • ORLJ 5045 Organizational dynamics and theory (3) (prerequisite ORLJ 4005)
  • ORLJ 5148 Managing conflict in organizations (3)

Plus one of the following application courses:

  • ORLJ 5012 Organizational internship (2-3) (prerequisite ORLJ 4005)
  • ORLJ 5340 Basic practicum in conflict resolution (3)
  • ORLJ 6343 Practicum in change and consultation in organizations (5) (prerequisites ORL 5362, ORLJ 4005)

Plus one of the following advanced theory courses:

  • ORLJ 5005 Leadership and supervision (3)
  • ORLJ 5046 Intercultural communications in organizational contexts: Theory, issues, and practices (3)
  • ORLJ 6040 Fundamentals of cooperation, conflict resolution, and mediation in different institutional contexts (3)

Breadth Courses: 6 credits Teachers College, non-ORLJ courses are required. Please consult an advisor.

Suggested Organizational Psychology Elective/Concentration Courses:

The following courses are suggested electives within ORLJ. Students may choose from among these electives and other relevant electives that are not listed here (including courses at the Graduate School of Business, SIPA, etc.) upon consultation with an academic advisor.

  • ORLJ 4010 Executive coaching (3)
  • ORLJ 5002 Advanced functions of organizations (3)
  • ORLJ 5005 Leadership and supervision (3)
  • ORLJ 5012 Organizational internship (1-3)
  • ORLJ 5017 Small group intervention: Improving team performance (3)
  • ORLJ 5018 Using survey research in organizational consulting (3)
  • ORLJ 5019 Data-based interventions in organizations (3)
  • ORLJ 5046 Intercultural communications in organizational contexts: Theory, issues, and practices (3)
  • ORLJ 5055 Organization change: Theory and practice (3)
  • ORLJ 5115 Social networks and performance (3)
  • ORLJ 6040 Fundamentals of cooperation, conflict resolution, and mediation in different institutional contexts (3)
  • ORLJ 6343 Practicum in change and consultation in organizations (5)
  • ORLJ 6350 Advanced practicum in conflict resolution (3)

Internship

While not a prerequisite for graduation, an internship may be helpful for proper job placement. The purpose of the internship is to provide students with an opportunity to gain practical experience relevant to their interests and to apply the principles of organizational psychology theories to real-world situations. Students who are interested in doing an internship should consult with an academic advisor.

Comprehensive Examination

The Comprehensive Examination may be taken after a student has completed the core level 1 courses receiving the grade of a C+ or above. In addition, 32 of 45 credits toward the M.A. degree must be complete or in progress the semester the exam is taken. Students are encouraged to take the exam in their penultimate semester of the MA program.

A student must score 80% or above to pass the comprehensive examination. Should a student fail the examination twice, he/she will not be allowed to continue in the MA program.

EXECUTIVE MASTERS PROGRAM IN ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY WITH A SPECIALIZATION IN CHANGE LEADERSHIP (ORGX)

Executives enrolled in the program will be exposed to a change leadership curriculum that is both grounded in traditional psychological and business principles but also focused on working with and managing change in organizational environments of the future. Course content and learning objectives reflect professionally documented competencies essential for successful change leaders and are sequenced to emphasize the multi-level, complex nature of change in today’s organizations. Executives will learn about change-related topics at the societal, organizational, group, and individual levels and will be asked to integrate their own learning and professional development through action research projects, cultural events, and participation in discussion-based reflective practice courses. The curriculum for the Executive Masters Program is comprised of three components. Executives will enroll in twelve “core” courses that reflect the fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities required for leading organization change. These courses are sequenced across four Learning Modules, each of which focuses on a different aspect or level of change in organizations (e.g., system, group, individual).

In addition to the core, two “integrative” courses have also been developed to assist the translation and application of course concepts to the actual work environment, namely through action research and individual and group reflection. These integrative courses will span the length of the entire program and will have virtual components that occur in the liminal spaces between modules. A final course is comprised of attendance at and participation in four cultural events and spans the length of the program as well. All integrative and cultural experience courses are part of the formal curriculum and will be taken for credit.

Capstone Project

Executives will be required to complete an action research project related to a change leadership challenge within their sponsoring organizations.


Degree Requirements: Ph.D. Program

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (ORGD)

Students are required to take a minimum of 75 points for the Ph.D. Occasionally, students may transfer credits - up to a maximum of 30 points from previous graduate training at other institutions. Transferring the maximum is unusual, because courses transferred must be equivalent to courses that are required in the Ph.D. program.

Students are encouraged to design an individually meaningful course of study within the larger offerings of the program. Opportunities for doing this are available through coursework, work with faculty members, independent research and study, and teaching activities. Students take a series of required courses that build a strong foundation in social-organizational psychology and may also select a series of more specialized courses depending on their specific areas of interest. Additional focus and expertise are developed through collaboration on major research projects with faculty members and practice-based or consulting activities under faculty supervision.

Research Training

The research training for doctoral students involves acquiring an understanding of underlying concepts and theories in social and organizational psychology and gaining experience in conducting research in both field and laboratory settings. The formal coursework provides a strong foundation in both social psychology and organizational psychology theories and their applications. A series of research methods courses provide the foundation necessary for understanding and conducting scholarly research. Similarly, a series of courses in measurement and statistics provides students with the strong statistical and analytical background necessary for the research process.

Research experience is gained through “workgroups.” Workgroups are research teams led by a faculty member and consist of four to ten doctoral students. In workgroups, students participate in the design, execution, data analysis, and writing phases of research projects. All students are required to participate in workgroups each semester for the first four years. The commitment to research training is an important part of the program and consumes a significant amount of students’ time.

Applied Aspects of the Program

The applied aspects of the program for doctoral students involve the development of skills and knowledge in the application of theory and research to practice and consulting activities. As such, students acquire an understanding of the systems approach, in particular, the dynamic interaction among individuals, groups, organizations, and their environments as well as an understanding of organization development and the process of organization change. A variety of opportunities are available for students to develop skills in conducting applied and action research and in providing consultation to groups and organizations. All of these activities are grounded in theory and research in social-organizational psychology. A series of courses are available which provide students with basic skills in interpersonal relationships, interviewing and information gathering techniques, and process consultation. In addition, supervised field experiences are available whereby students engage in an applied project with a local organization under faculty direction. Internships and other work-related experiences are also examples of field experiences.  The Ph.D. Program in Social-Organizational Psychology is a scientist-practitioner program and as such focuses on both research and practice. The curriculum represents the dual emphasis of the program.

The following are six areas from which students select courses:

  1. Research and Statistics
  2. Theory and Practice in Social-Organizational Psychology
  3. Integrative Experiences
  4. Breadth Requirement
  5. Elective courses
  6. Dissertation Advisement

Students take 29-31+ required courses for a total of 75-79+ points. Variable-point courses should be taken for the minimum rather than the maximum number of points in order to have both the required number of points and the desired distribution of courses.

For a more comprehensive description of the Ph.D. program requirements, please see the Ph.D. program handbook, located on the Social-Organizational Psychology student resources web page. The handbook should be considered the primary document with regard to degree requirements for the Ph.D. program, including information on requirements for the two Qualifying Papers.

1.) Research and Statistics (6 courses required)

  • ORLJ 5040 Research methods in social psychology
  • HUDM 4122 Probability and statistical inference
  • HUDM 5122 Applied regression analysis
  • HUDM 5123 Linear models and experimental design
  • HUDM 6122 Multivariate analysis I

Plus one of the following:

  • ORL 5522 Evaluations methods I
  • ORL 5524 Instrument design & validation
  • ORL 6500 Qualitative research methods in organizations: Design and data collection
  • ORL 6501 Qualitative research methods in organizations: Data analysis and reporting
  • ORLJ 5018 Using survey research in organizational consulting  
  • ORLA 6641 Advanced topics in research methods and design
  • HUDM 5026 Introduction to data analysis in R
  • HUDM 5059 Psychological measurement
  • HUDM 5124 Multidimensional scaling and clustering
  • HUDM 6026 Computational statistics
  • HUDM 6030 Multilevel and longitudinal data analysis
  • HUDM 6055 Latent structure analysis

2.) Theory and Practice in Social-Organizational Psychology (12 courses required)

Courses in this section are sub-divided into theory/seminar and practice courses.  Of the twelve required courses, there are five courses that are set (two pro-seminars, as well as three practice courses).  Of the seven remaining courses, four must be theory/seminar courses taught by TC Faculty, while the remaining three may be selected from either the remaining optional theory/seminar courses or the remaining optional practice courses listed below.

THEORY/SEMINAR

 Required:

  • ORLJ 5540 Pro-seminar in social psychology
  • ORLJ 5541 Pro-seminar in organizational psychology

 Optional:

  • ORLJ 5005 Leadership and supervision
  • ORLJ 5055 Organization change: Theory and practice
  • ORLJ 5155 Social Networks & Performance
  • ORLJ 6040 Fundamentals of cooperation, conflict resolution, and mediation in different institutional contexts
  • ORLJ 6045 Demography in organizations
  • ORLJ 6500 Stereotypes and stereotypic processes in organizational contexts
  • ORLJ 6502 Dynamic networks and systems
  • ORLJ 6520 Advanced professional writing seminar
  • B 9506 Organizational behavior

PRACTICE

Required:

  • ORL 5362 Group dynamics: A systems perspective
  • ORLJ 6343 Practicum in change and consultation in organizations
  • ORLJ 6349 Practicum in process consultation

Optional:

  • ORLJ 4002 Functions of organizations
  • ORLJ 4010 Executive coaching
  • ORLJ 5002 Advanced functions of organizations
  • ORLJ 5017 Small group intervention: Improving team performance
  • ORLJ 5148 Managing conflicts in organizations
  • ORLJ 5340 Practicum in Conflict Resolution
  • ORLJ 6244 Fieldwork in organizational coaching and consultation
  • ORLJ 6350 Advanced practicum in conflict resolution
  • ORLD 5055 Staff development and training
  • ORLD 5061 The learning organization

3.) Integrative Experiences

Integrative experiences include participation in eight semesters of workgroups and colloquia, as well as graduate teaching assistantships.

WORKGROUPS

The curriculum is designed to facilitate students’ completion of two qualifying papers, while enrolled in workgroups for the first four years of the program.

  • ORLJ 6342 Workgroup (Loriann Roberson)
  • ORLJ 6344 Workgroup (Peter Coleman)
  • ORLJ 6345 Workgroup (Elissa Perry)
  • ORLJ 6346 Workgroup (James Westaby)
  • ORLJ 6347 Workgroup (Caryn Block)
  • ORLJ 6348 Workgroup (W. Warner Burke)
  • ORLJ 6349.33 Workgroup (Debra Noumair)

Notes:

  1. One workgroup per semester for a minimum of eight semesters is required from the time a student enters the Ph.D. program.
  2. Students must take six of the eight workgroups for credit points (see Ph.D. Handbook for guidelines). An exception may be made for students who participated in a workgroup as a master’s student in the social-organizational psychology program, in which case, the student must take a minimum of four of the eight workgroups for credit.
  3. Workgroup points may not be substituted for required courses.
  4. Students are required to actively engage in at least two different workgroups over the eight semesters that workgroup is required. Active engagement means regular participation in the design and conduct of research until it reaches a conclusion. Solely being present at meetings does not satisfy the requirement.

COLLOQUIUM

Each semester, the program holds a number of colloquia and related activities including invited speakers from academia and consulting, presentations from program members, and general meetings. These are important developmental experiences for learning about research, practice, and professionalism. Attendance is required throughout the first four years of the program.

  • ORLJ 6640 Social-organizational psychology colloquium

TEACHING ASSISTANSHIPS

Doctoral students are required to serve as a graduate teaching assistant for master's-level courses (in the Fall and in the Spring) for two years within their first three years of the Social-Organizational Psychology Program. The TA-ship requirement starts in the student’s second year, unless they are a graduate of the M.A. program. Students typically are expected to act as graduate teaching assistants for the Master’s level core courses (Human Resources Management, Organizational Psychology, Understanding Behavioral Research, to name a few). Beyond this, additional graduate teaching assistantship opportunities are available for more advanced courses (e.g., Organizational Dynamics, Leadership and Supervision, Group Dynamics, Executive Coaching, etc.).

4.) Breadth Requirement

You must take three breadth courses. A breadth course must be outside of your program of study (in this case, non-ORLJ) and must also be a course at Teachers College.  On the College forms, you are strongly encouraged to count your statistics/methods as breadth courses.

5.) Elective Courses

To fulfill the 75-credit program, electives can be taken in addition to required courses and the Breadth Requirement. Any ORLJ courses may be taken as electives. Below is a list of pre-approved elective courses outside of ORLJ, including courses at Columbia. This list is NOT exhaustive.

If a student wishes to take a course not listed here, he/she must get written approval from the Ph.D. Coordinator (an email will suffice). If the student is at risk of being closed out of the course by waiting for approval, it is best to register for the course during the interim period and then drop it, if necessary.

  • ORLJ 5003 Human resource management
  • ORLJ 5045 Organizational dynamics
  • ORL 5524 Instrument design and validation
  • ORLD 4051 How adults learn
  • ORLD 4827 Fostering transformational learning
  • ORLD 5821 Leveraging EQ to enhance org effectiveness
  • ORLD 5822 Building productive relationships with SQ
  • ORLD 5823 Building 21st century organizational capabilities with CQ
  • B 7553 Managerial decision making 
  • B 9506 Organizational behavior
  • CCPJ 5020 Racism and racial identity in psychology and education
  • CCPJ 5062 Career counseling
  • CCPX 4035 Personality and behavior change
  • CCPX 5034 Developmental psychopathology
  • HUDK 5023 Cognitive development
  • HUDK 5029 Personality development across the life span
  • HUDM 5059 Psychological measurement

Certification After Completing Coursework

Certification Examination in Psychology: The Research Methods Examination (RME) in Psychology is part of the certification process for doctoral students in all of the psychology programs at Teachers College. The examination measures students' knowledge in statistics, measurement, and research design and is developed by the Research Methods Examination Committee.

Qualifying Papers: All doctoral candidates in social-organizational psychology must submit two qualifying papers (Theory-based Empirical and Applied). The primary purposes of the qualifying papers are integrative, diagnostic, pedagogical, and evaluative. The qualifying papers are examples of the kind of work students will be doing as social-organizational psychologists. The papers provide an opportunity for the faculty to help develop and evaluate the student’s skills in an ongoing and iterative process.

6.) The Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation is a report of independently conducted research. In formulating and conducting this research, the student has available as consultants and advisors two or three members of the faculty. Students will need to register for dissertation‐related classes. There is a sequence of courses that vary with respect to course credit and fee. When actively working on the dissertation and meeting with one’s sponsor and/or committee, students are expected to register for ORLJ 7501 two semesters. This course is only offered for 1‐3 points and students can register for the minimum number of credits; it is offered for variable credit to accommodate the different needs of various students. Once the student has registered for two terms of ORLJ 7501, Ph.D. students are required to register for ORLJ 8900 for 0 credits and pay the fee for every semester until the term of the final defense when a student must enroll TI8900, PhD Dissertation Defense.  Please see the Office of Doctoral Studies for information regarding the fees.


Degree Requirements: Advanced Certificate in Cooperation and Conflict Resolution

Advanced Certificate in Cooperation and Conflict Resolution

In addition to the degree programs previously described, the Program in Social-Organizational Psychology, through the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), offers an Advanced Certificate in Cooperation and Conflict Resolution approved by the New York State Education Department. Students interested in receiving the certificate must complete a sequence of five courses and one semester of internship. Students who opt for the Advanced Certificate must complete an application for admission through the Office of Admission. Students in the M.A./Ph.D. program who wish to take their electives within the area of conflict resolution but who do not wish to receive the Advanced Certificate may register for courses without completing an application. The courses are offered in conjunction with the MD-ICCCR whose mission is to help individuals, schools, communities, businesses, and governments better understand the nature of conflict and how to achieve its constructive resolution. Contact: Professor Peter Coleman at (212) 678-3402.


Application Information

Master of Arts in Organizational Psychology (ORGM)

The 45-point M.A. program in organizational psychology admits students for the summer and fall semesters.

For a more comprehensive descreiption of the M.A. program and its requirements, please see the Social-Organizational Psychology M.A. Handbook.

Persons from a variety of academic backgrounds and work experiences may qualify for admission to the program. Primary consideration for admission is given to previous academic record, work experiences, letters of reference, GRE scores, and the personal statement. The GRE General Test is required for M.A. applicants. In lieu of the GRE, applicants may submit GMAT scores. The early deadline for fall applications is January 15. The final deadline for fall applications is April 15. 

Executive Masters Program in Organizational Psychology with a specialization in Change Leadership (ORGX)

Individuals selected for the Executive Master's Program must have at least eight to ten years of work experience and must be able to demonstrate that continued education and training in change leadership would enhance their ability to work effectively in their formal organizational roles. Mid-career professionals and aspiring organizational leaders who wish to lead and manage future change efforts are especially encouraged to apply. Full-time employment, organizational sponsorship, two letters of reference, a personal statement, a current work product, an undergraduate transcript, and a recent resume are all required for admission. Admission decisions will be made on a rolling basis. Individuals who apply to the program are strongly encouraged to do so before the application deadline (visit www.tc.edu/leadchange for more information). Students are admitted once annually. The program begins in late spring/early summer and concludes in May of the following year.

Doctor of Philosophy (ORGD)

Applicants are considered once a year for the fall semester only. Completed applications with supporting documentation must be received no later than December 15. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered. In addition to the application, applicants must provide documents supporting previous academic record, professional resume, letters of reference, GRE scores, a writing sample, and a personal statement. The writing sample must be a recently completed paper on a topic of interest to the applicant. This may be, but does not have to be, a paper submitted to satisfy course requirements for another academic program.

Admission to the doctoral program is highly competitive. Preference is given to candidates who possess excellent verbal and quantitative skills and whose transcripts, references, and previous work experience suggest that they have the potential to make a significant contribution to research, theory and practice. Please note that full-time study is required for the first and second years of study.

Faculty List

Faculty

Lecturers

Visiting Faculty

Adjunct

Full-Time Instructors

Instructors

Adjunct Associate Professor
Associate Adjunct Professor
Professor of Psychology and Education
Senior Lecturer
Full Adjunct- Education & Psychology
Lecturer
Edward Lee Thorndike Professorship of Psychology & Education
Adjunct Associate Education and Psychology
Professor of Measurement, Evaluation & Education Director of Assessment and Evaluation Research Initiative
Adjunct Assistant
Associate Adjunct Professor
Professor of Psychology and Education
Adjunct Full- Education and Psychology
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education and Psychology
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Associate Professor
Adjunct Associate Professor
Adjunct Associate-- Education & Psychology
Associate Professor of Practice
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Associate Professor of Psychology and Education
Professor of Practice of Social Organizational Psychology
Professor of Psychology and Education
Adjunct Assistant--Education and Psychology
Curriculum Development Specialist
Associate Adjunct Professor
Adjunct Assistant - Education & Psychology
Adjunct Assistant - Education & Psychology
Professor of Psychology and Education
Adjunct Associate Faculty
Associate Adjunct Professor
Instructor- Education and Psychology
Adjunct Professor
Instructor
Temporary Professional
Adjunct Full Professor
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Adjunct Associate- Education and Psychology
Professor of Psychology and Education

For up to date information about course offerings including faculty information, please visit the online course schedule.

Course List

ORL 5362 Group dynamics: A systems perspective

Enrollment limited. The course explores social processes in groups and their impact on individual behavior. In addition to a series of lectures/discussions, students are required to participate in an experiential group relations conference or to conduct a self-study project on group relations. Special fee is required.This class gives students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of group dynamics from a systemic perspective and to learn about their own behavior in groups. Readings, lectures, and discussions will address dynamics as they occur in varied groups, systems and contexts including the business world, educational institutions, healthcare systems, the military, religious institutions, and in community and family life. The interplay of power, authority, socio-political identities, and group dynamics is emphasized.

ORL 5522 Evaluation Methods I

Prerequisite: ORLJ 4009, Understanding Behavioral Research, or an instructor-approved substitute. This course provides an overview of major evaluation models and social research methods useful in designing evaluations of social interventions, programs, policies, services/products, or institutions. A main aim of the course is to develop critical consumers of evaluation research. 

ORL 5523 Evaluation Methods II--Seminar

ORL 5523 is designed as an evaluation research laboratory. The course emphasizes selected readings and skill-building on an array of methodological topics covering qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods techniques through hands-on experiences with a “client-based problem” and data set.

Prerequisite: ORL 5522, Evaluation Methods I, or an instructor-approved substitute. It is highly desirable that students have completed one or more added courses in statistics, data analysis (in qualitative or quantitative methods), or measurement before they begin ORL 5523. 

ORL 5524 Instrument design and validation

This course provides hands-on experiences in the design and validation of a variety of assessment devices, such as, tests, scales, survey-based indices, or other instruments to tap educational, psychological, health, or other social constructs. The course draws (mainly) on techniques and theory from Classical Test Theory in measurement.

Prerequisite: ORL 5522, Evaluation Methods I, or an instructor-approved substitute.  It is highly desirable that students have completed one or more added courses in statistics, including multiple regression before they begin ORL 5524.

ORLJ 4000 Conflict Resolution and Schools: Pedagogy and Curriculum Design

This course investigates the field of conflict resolution education in the context of supporting student academic achievement, increasing social and emotional learning, and creating positive and caring classrooms.

ORLJ 4002 Functions of organizations
A survey of the primary functions and operations of organizations: accounting, finance, marketing, strategic planning, management information systems, and the relation of these functions to human resource management.
ORLJ 4005 Organizational psychology

Introduction to theories and research that underlie the field of organizational psychology. Implications and applications in various organizational contexts are considered.

ORLJ 4009 Understanding behavioral research
Overview of alternative methods of behavioral research and their relative strengths and limitations. Application of methodological principles in order to read and evaluate social science research and learn how to begin to conduct research.
ORLJ 4010 Executive coaching

Executive Coaching combines two previously taught courses into one in order to integrate theory and practice.  As such, this course is intended to provide students with an overview of theory, research, and practice related to coaching within organizational settings as coaching is viewed as a subset of organizational consultation.  Assuming some basic knowledge of organizational behavior and theory and limited experience with coaching, the course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain foundational knowledge of the coaching process, including how to create a coaching relationship, engage in coaching conversations, and build commitment for action planning.

ORLJ 4800 Conflict and Complexity: A Dynamical System Approach to Addressing Protracted Conflict

This course will develop the relevance of dynamical systems theory for understanding protracted and seemingly intractable conflict at different levels of social reality (interpersonal, inter-group, international) and will outline the conditions under which such conflict can be transformed.

ORLJ 4804 Healing and Reconciling Relationships in Conflict

This course examines the role that unaddressed and unhealed emotional trauma plays in creating and maintaining conflict. It also highlights unaddressed trauma as an obstacle to reconciliation-our ability to put the past to rest and to rebuild relationships that have broken under the strain of conflict.

ORLJ 4901 Research and independent study in social-organizational psychology

Permission Required. Student works closely with faculty in conducting research in social-organizational psychology and producing a substantive paper at semester's end.

ORLJ 5002 Advanced functions of organizations

In Advanced Functions of Organizations, students will learn about the larger contexts within which businesses function, the mechanisms by which they are regulated, the ways in which these contexts and mechanisms impact the viability and success of a business or organization, and the impact these variables have on the decision-making role and behavior of management and employees in an organization. Topics covered are market analysis and business ethics, capital markets, business law, and business strategy and decision-making.

ORLJ 5003 Human resource management

The goal of this course is to provide a solid understanding of theory, research, and practice in human resource management. Through a combination of reading, cases, lectures, and discussions of the material, students will understand human resources' ability to be a credible partner to the business and its pivotal role in supporting organizational strategy; the complexity of the human resources function to move from the sole mission of the attraction, motivation and retention of people to one that also attempts a line of sight and contribution to organizational value; and the various aspects of the human resources function such as human resource strategy, talent management, talent development, organizational design/effectiveness, and training.

ORLJ 5005 Leadership and supervision
Major psychological and other interdisciplinary approaches to the study of leadership. Critical analysis of relevant theories, research, and practical applications.
ORLJ 5012 Organizational Internship

This course is designed to provide meaningful, real-world work experience through temporary placement in an organizational setting.  It allows the student to gain exposure to and to apply academic theory within a Human Resources, Organizational Development, or other related professional environment where, upon graduation, employment is likely to be found.

ORLJ 5017 Small group intervention: Theory and method

Prerequisite: ORL 5362. This course gives students an opportunity to apply their knowledge of group and team dynamics in order to learn how to improve work team functioning and performance. The course covers a variety of models for effective teaming with an emphasis on how to apply those models to real work teams. Students learn relevant theory and research that underlies effective small group interventions and practice applied skills in teamwork. The class format is a seminar style with considerable discussion, case study analyses, role-plays, and small group work.

ORLJ 5018 Using survey research in organizational consulting
Prerequisite: ORLJ 4009. This course illustrates how to conduct survey research for organizational change initiatives. The following topics are covered: entering into survey research consulting, selecting concepts, conducting focus groups, survey construction and administration, data analysis, identifying needs, survey feedback techniques, and final reports. Students develop a survey-based project from initial conceptualization to final report presentation.
ORLJ 5019 Data-based interventions in organizations
Prerequisite: ORLJ 4009. Reviews tools for collecting, organizing, and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data in organizations. Students explore and practice the use of data collection techniques most frequently utilized by practitioners in the field (secondary data, observations, questionnaires, interviews, and focus groups), as well as practice analysis techniques associated with these tools. The use of diagnostic tools is considered within the framework of the consulting cycle (contracting and planning, data collection, data analysis, and data feedback). Upon completion of this course, the students should be well prepared to engage in a consultation with the real client.
ORLJ 5040 Research methods in social psychology
Open only to qualified doctoral students in the behavioral or social sciences. Representative approaches to practice in the design, conduct, and analysis of research. Fall: Experimental and quasi-experimental design. Spring: Field and survey methods; policy and evaluation research.
ORLJ 5045 Organizational dynamics and theory
Prerequisite: ORLJ 4005 or equivalent. Study of organizations as total systems with consideration of different types of organizations. Emphasis on the impact of such dimensions as mission, strategy, structure, culture, systems, and leadership on individual and organizational performance and vice versa. Organizational change is also addressed.
ORLJ 5046 Intercultural communications in organizational contexts: Theory, issues, and practices
This class is designed to explore the intercultural communication field and what it has to offer professional educators in the context of their understanding of intercultural theory and practice and in their ability to design effective and empathic learning environments.
ORLJ 5055 Organization change: Theory and practice

This course covers the primary content and substance of organization change. The content/substance includes theory, models and frameworks, research studies, and related concepts that influence the practice of organization change and vice versa: that is, how the practice of organization change influences theory, models, research, and concepts. The course is conducted as a combination of lecture and student activities and discussion with emphasis on (a) selected readings to be studied prior to each class and (b) discussion during class by all students.

ORLJ 5115 Social networks and performance

This course allows students to understand how social networks influence performance in a wide variety of settings. Relevant topics in the application of social network ideology are explored, such as motivated goal pursuits, leadership processes, and the structure of group and organizational networks. The course also explores important interpersonal processes through a social network lens, such as human conflict, emotional contagion, and helping behavior.

ORLJ 5148 Managing conflicts in organizations

This course investigates how conflicts unfold in organizational settings, and explores the causes, influencing factors and strategies for managing these conflicts.

ORLJ 5310 Preparation for Coaching
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic structure and techniques of interviewing and listening. The course is largely experiential and is intended for students who have little or no background or experience in counseling or coaching.
ORLJ 5340 Basic practicum in conflict resolution

An experiential course aimed at developing basic collaborative negotiation and mediation skills for interpersonal conflict in a variety of contexts. Students will have the opportunity to develop more self-awareness and basic collaborative negotiation skills with supervised practice.

ORLJ 5540 Proseminar in social and organizational psychology

Open only to qualified doctoral students in the behavioral or social sciences. Intensive readings and analysis of theories and research in social psychology and social structure.

ORLJ 5541 Proseminar in social and organizational psychology
Open only to qualified doctoral students in the behavioral or social sciences. Intensive readings and analysis of theories and research in social and organizational psychology and social structure.
ORLJ 6040 Fundamentals of cooperation, conflict resolution and mediation in different institutional contexts
Topics such as cooperation and competition, trust and suspicion, bargaining and negotiation as they relate to conflict resolution in various contexts.
ORLJ 6045 Demography in Organizations
This course seeks to understand the role that demography plays in organizations. The main focus in this course is on demographic variables such as race, gender, and disability. The course examines various theoretical frameworks that help us to understand how demographic variables influence organizational behavior and decisions.
ORLJ 6244 Fieldwork in change, coaching, and supervision

Permission required. Prerequisites: ORL 5362 and ORLJ 4010. Students will be trained in Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR) and practice their acquired skills with the facilitation of the executive coaching labs (ORLJ 4010). Students meet in seminar format to debrief facilitation sessions, integrate learning, and advance their coaching knowledge and skills through reflection and assigned reading. Additional coaching opportunities and supervision may be undertaken.

ORLJ 6342 Research workgroup in social-organizational psychology: Multi-level research in organizations
Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.
ORLJ 6343 Practicum in change and consultation in organizations

Prerequisite: ORL 5362 and ORLJ 4005. Enrollment limited. Open to master's students and doctoral candidates who have a strong background in social science, organizational behavior, administration, psychology, or business. Offers the opportunity to understand the consulting process through work on change projects involving actual clients.  

ORLJ 6344 Research workgroup in social-organizational psychology: Conflict, justice, and cooperation
Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.
ORLJ 6345 Research workgroup in social-organizational psychology: Diversity and discrimination in organizations
Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.
ORLJ 6346 Research workgroup in social-organizational psychology: Dynamic Network Lab

Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.

ORLJ 6347 Practicum: Diversity Dynamics in Organizations

Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.

ORLJ 6348 Research workgroup in social-organizational psychology: Psychology of managerial and leadership competence and multirater feedback
Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.
ORLJ 6349 Practicum: Process Consultation

Permission required. Limited to doctoral students. Topics are announced in the preliminary and final course schedules distributed each semester.

ORLJ 6350 Advanced practicum in conflict resolution

Prerequisite: ORLJ 5340. Limited enrollment. Students will engage in negotiation and mediation involving persons from different cultural contexts as well as with "difficult" cases.

ORLJ 6500 Stereotypes and stereotypic processes in organizational contexts
Open only to qualified doctoral students in the behavioral or social sciences. This course seeks to understand how stereotypes are typically structured and operate, as well as the types of information they include. This course specifically considers the role of stereotypes and stereotypic processes in organizational contexts.
ORLJ 6502 Dynamic Networks and Systems

Doctoral seminar. This seminar examines various theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of complex systems. Example topics include traditional systems theory, social network analysis, dynamic network theory, social interaction analysis, and simulations of complex systems. A variety of frameworks are addressed that span individual, dyadic, group, organizational, and international levels.

ORLJ 6520 Advanced professional writing seminar

For doctoral students, only. This course is designed to help students develop the writing skills needed in their academic and post-academic careers. Course topics include establishing and maintaining good writing habits; writing theoretical, applied, and empirical papers; providing and responding to reviewer comments on manuscripts; and ethics in writing. The course provides a support for students as they work on completing their own qualifying papers. The desired and expected outcome of the course is at least one completed qualifying paper or paper ready to submit for publication.

ORLJ 6540 Contemporary Issues in Organizational Psychology

The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of assessment tools from a psychological perspective and to learn about the wide range of applications of assessments in organizations. The course aims to enable students to apply, understand, and interpret scientific assessment tools throughout the talent management spectrum: selecting, onboarding, developing and engaging employees. Psychometric and test theory, a brief history of applied assessment, and the key methodologies used to assess and measure major work-related constructs (e.g., EQ, IQ, personality, and leadership potential) will be discussed, as well as novel applications of assessment and the future of talent identification. The course will pay particular attention to assessment-based solutions or interventions, such as executive coaching, organizational development, and high potential identification programs.

ORLJ 6640 Social-organizational psychology colloquium
Permission required. For doctoral candidates only. Discussion of ongoing projects involving research and consultation.
ORLJ 6901 Advanced research and independent study in social-organizational psychology

Permission required.

ORLJ 7501 Dissertation seminar
Permission required. Development of doctoral dissertations and presentation of plans for approval. Registration limited to two terms. For requirements, see section on Continuous Registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
ORLJ 8900 Dissertation advisement in social-organizational psychology
Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see section on Continuous Registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.