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Center for African Education
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Center for African Education

About CAE > CAE Staff

CAE Staff

S. Garnett Russell, Interim Director
Assistant Professor of International and Comparative Education
sgrussell@tc.columbia.edu

Office Location: 368 Grace Dodge

S. Garnett Russell is an Assistant Professor of International and Comparative Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. She earned her doctorate in International and Comparative Education from Stanford University. Her research focuses on education and conflict, human rights, citizenship, and gender, particularly in Rwanda, Burundi, and South Africa. Recent publications appear in International Studies Quarterly, Prospects, and Compare.



In Memoriam

Dr. George Bond, Director
William F. Russell Professor of Anthropology and Education
gcb1@columbia.edu

Office Location: 375 Grace Dodge

Dr. George Clement Bond is the Director of the Center for African Education and William F. Russell Professor for Anthropology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.  His interests include education and elite formation in the United States and Africa; African studies; African religions and politics; agrarian transformations; and cultural dimensions of urban and minority populations.   He has conducted research on political and religious change among the Tumbuka-speaking peoples of Zambia and Malawi; social dimensions of AIDS in Southern Uganda; and privatization, democratization and the plight of the poor in northern Zambia.  Dr. Bond has been the Director of the Institute of African Studies at Columbia University and President of the Association for Africanist Anthropology.  His most recent publications include Contested Terrains and Constructed Categories: Contemporary Africa in Focus (2002) and Witchcraft Dialogues: Anthropological and Philosophical Exchanges (2001). He holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the London School of Economics.



Graduate Assistants
 
Julie Dunn, Program Coordinator
Ed.M Candidate, International Development Education
Dept. of International and Transcultural Studies
jed2166@tc.columbia.edu
Office Location: 375A Grace Dodge Hall

Julie Dunn is an Ed.M candidate in International Educational Development with a focus in African Education. Advocating for teachers, she spent the summer of 2014 gathering interviews among local Gambian teachers on government influence within their classroom instruction. She holds an MA in Elementary Education from Louisiana State University with four years of teaching experience in New York City in addition to two years as teacher trainer in the Gambia.





Jonathon
Fairhead, Grant Writing Coordinator
Ed.M candidate, Peace Education
Dept. of International and Transcultural Studies
jtf2116@tc.columbia.edu
Office Location: 375A Grace Dodge Hall

Jonathon Fairhead is an Ed.M candidate in Peace Education. His research uses oral history methods and focuses on informal and activist education, in and out of social movements, in South Africa and the United States. Current projects look at how activist knowledge in South Africa is learned and passed from generation to generation, and how learners in the United States decide to self-educate in opposition to, and outside of, the academy. Previous work has included a video oral history project and teach-in on gender and capitalism set in Zucotti Park during Occupy Wall Street. He received his MFA in Creative Writing, Fiction from Brooklyn College.




Amelia Herbert, Teacher and School Coordinator
PhD candidate, Anthropology and Education
Dept. of International and Transcultural Studies
ash2189@tc.columbia.edu
Office Location: 375A Grace Dodge Hall


Amelia Herbert is a PhD student in Anthropology and Education. In the summer of 2013 she worked with teachers in South African high schools researching the ways that imported practices from the United States are adapted to suit local contexts. She is also interested in the social and cultural incorporation of low income, first generation college students from historically disadvantaged backgrounds at white-dominant universities in the United States and South Africa. She holds an M.S.Ed. in Childhood Education from Hunter College and has eight years of experience teaching in public schools at the primary and secondary levels.