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Center for African Education
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Center for African Education

About CAE > CAE Staff

CAE Staff

Dr. George Bond, Director
William F. Russell Professor of Anthropology and Education
gcb1@columbia.edu

Office Location: 375 Grace Dodge

Dr. George Clement Bond is the Director of the Center for African Education and William F. Russell Professor for Anthropology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.  His interests include education and elite formation in the United States and Africa; African studies; African religions and politics; agrarian transformations; and cultural dimensions of urban and minority populations.   He has conducted research on political and religious change among the Tumbuka-speaking peoples of Zambia and Malawi; social dimensions of AIDS in Southern Uganda; and privatization, democratization and the plight of the poor in northern Zambia.  Dr. Bond has been the Director of the Institute of African Studies at Columbia University and President of the Association for Africanist Anthropology.  His most recent publications include Contested Terrains and Constructed Categories: Contemporary Africa in Focus (2002) and Witchcraft Dialogues: Anthropological and Philosophical Exchanges (2001). He holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the London School of Economics.



Graduate Assistants
 

Bruce Burnside, Program Coordinator
PhD Candidate, Anthropology and Education
Dept. of International and Transcultural Studies
bsb2125@tc.columbia.edu
Office Location: 375A Grace Dodge Hall
Office Hours: Weds. 10:00-12:00am and by appointment

Bruce Burnside is a PhD candidate in Anthropology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His current research focuses on the Turkish migration to Germany and the experience of young people with immigration backgrounds and issues of national belonging, with particular attention given to questions of education. His research also extends to Turkish-Germans' relations to and in Turkey and the historical connections between the two countries. Previous work has focused on religious tolerance in Ottoman Bosnia as well as African American Islam. He received his Masters in Anthropology from Columbia University


Darlene Dubuisson, Outreach Coordinator
PhD Student, Applied Anthropology
Dept. of International and Transcultural Studies

ded2121@tc.columbia.edu
Office Location: 375A Grace Dodge Hall
Office hours: (please email to schedule an appointment)


Darlene Dubuisson is a PhD student in Applied Anthropology at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her current research is on Haitian intellectuals in nation building in post-earthquake Haiti. Her areas of scholarly interest include African and the Caribbean, intellectualism, and Anthropology of nations and nationalism. She holds a Master in International Educational Development, African Education concentration, from Teachers College, Columbia University.