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Reimagining Education: Teaching and Learning in Racially Diverse Schools

July 18-21, 2016

July 18, 2016 - July 21, 2016

A 2016 Summer Institute at Teachers College in New York City

Hours: 9am to 5pm each day

Registration Fee: 

$795 per person

Contact CPS for group rates.

Eligible for Professional Development Credit and three (3) Continuing Education Units!

TC students and other graduate students may earn graduate school credit.

For more information, please contact:

Tracy Vadakumchery, Administrative Coordinator for The Summer Institute, tjv2109@tc.columbia.edu, or

Steve Ackerman, Director of Continuing Professional Studies, at cps@tc.columbia.edu or at (212) 678-8311

 

Summer Institute Schedule - Now Available! (PDF)


Teachers College, Columbia University is launching a new Summer Institute for educators, policy makers, and parents who live and work in racially and ethnically diverse communities in the cities or suburbs. As the demographics of the nation shift rapidly we see families of color moving to once all-white suburbs and white, non-Hispanic families moving into gentrifying pockets of cities. The result is a growing number of diverse communities, college campuses and public schools. The challenge for our nation today is to at long last create truly integrated learning environments that tap into the educational benefits of racially diverse schools and classrooms. Our summer institute will demonstrate how educators can fulfill this critical mission and best prepare all students for the 21st Century.

Who Should Attend?

The Reimagining Education Summer Institute is designed to help all educators – in public, private, charter schools and higher education – learn how to create truly integrated public schools that tap into the educational benefits of racially diverse schools and classrooms.  This professional development Institute is designed primarily for teachers, school administrators, district officials, parents, and graduate students in education and all others who are interested in addressing racial diversity in changing schools and classrooms.

Demand for the Institute

Teachers, administrators and school district personnel need to be prepared to address the changing demographics of our society. At the same time, racial attitudes among younger generations are shifting to become more accepting of people of all races. These younger Americans – the parents of current and future school-aged children – are asking for more meaningful pedagogy that will prepare children for the diverse, global society they will inherit. Concurrently, employers and universities are seeking workers and students who can cross cultural boundaries and collaborate with and learn from people of many races, ethnicities, nationalities and religions.

Demographic, geographic, and attitudinal shifts call out for new and innovative ways of providing novice and veteran educators with the tools necessary to educate and empower a more diverse student body to engage with a global economy and society.

This Institute will combine the expertise of Teachers College faculty, other faculty from around the country, and K-12 public and private school teachers and administrators from New York City metro region. Together, we will explore innovative ways to better prepare educators for a more racially and ethnically diverse student population.

Learning Objectives/Outcomes

The Summer Institute participants will grapple with the many ways in which race and ethnicity matter in the teaching and learning that takes place within racially diverse schools and classrooms and how to design educational settings in which all students can learn from each other.  Challenging issues and topics to be covered include racial identity, racial literacy, multicultural education, culturally relevant pedagogy, addressing racial politics, and how implicit biases affect leadership and teaching in diverse schools.

Key Takeaways:

Participants will:

  • learn to foster the educational benefits of diversity for all students;
  • enhance students’ interracial understanding, empathy, and ability to learn from people of diverse backgrounds;
  • develop strategies to tap into the insights and knowledge of diverse groups of students;
  • facilitate dialogues among students, staff and parents about issues of race;
  • understand racial identities within racially diverse contexts; 
  • develop culturally relevant curriculum and pedagogy;
  • improve achievement outcomes for all students;
  • build community and engage parents;
  • frame diverse schools as the most desirable schools for the 21st century; and
  • promote the educational and social advantages of diverse schools;

Attendee Participation:

The Institute mixes large plenary sessions that foster greater understanding of issues related to race and ethnicity in the U.S.; racial literacy; multicultural education; critical leadership and student critiques.

Participants will also engage in daily dialogue sessions with attendees from different educational roles and professional positions, as well as different locations, to connect these macro themes to their context.

They will also participate in 6 hands-on professional development workshops of no more than 20-25 participants, led by Teachers College faculty and other noted education leaders. Participants will sign up for workshops ahead of time.

Participants will also connect over informal lunches and in social networking receptions. After the Institute, participants can continue to dialogue via a private online forum designed to foster thoughtful exchanges on difficult topics. 

Cultivating Racial Literacy through Children's Literature

Detra Price-Dennis, Teachers College

Tuesday 7/19 and Wednesday 7/20, mornings

The workshop will explore the ways in which children’s literature serves as a powerful cultural artifact that can be read to mediate conversations about diversity in our society. We will take an in-depth look at culturally diverse literature with a specific focus on race, exploring how children’s literature can function as a tool to develop racial literacy, cultural competence, and critical consciousness.

[Re]Defining Culturally Relevant Mentoring as part of Educational Leadership Development

 

Phillip Smith, Teachers College

Tues, 7/19, am; Wed, 7/20, am; Thurs, 7/21, pm

In this workshop, we will examine broad definitions of the terms “culturally relevant” and “mentoring” and their use and applicability as part of adult and leadership development. The workshop provides an opportunity for participants to explore the nature of cross-cultural, and Afrocentric models of mentoring, as well as the role of critical spirituality within the field of education and leadership development. Through our collective exploration in the workshop, we will strive to formulate a new and comprehensive definition of culturally relevant mentoring that emphasizes the importance of cultural integrity, affirmation of individual uniqueness, and collective racial/cultural identity as part of leadership development.

Teaching and Learning Racial Literacy in Social Studies Classrooms

Terrie Epstein, Hunter College

Tues, 7/19, Wed 7/20, Thursday, 7/21, am & pm

Race/ethnicity and other forms of difference that constitute our national history and contemporary society can be taught and learned in ways that enable young people to acquire a sense of civic agency. In this workshop, participants will consider how teachers' and students' social identities influence their interpretations of national history and contemporary society. They also will learn strategies to address “difficult” social studies topics about the nation’s historical and ongoing legacy of violence and inequality related to race/ethnicity and other forms of difference. 

Using Hip Hop as Therapy in Urban Schools

Ian Levy, Teachers College

Tues, 7/19, Wed 7/20, Thursday, 7/21, am & pm

This workshop will cover the use of a school counseling framework, Hip Hop and Spoken Word Therapy (HHSWT), that can be used within both counseling offices and classroom spaces. Workshop participants will receive valuable information about the various mental health disparities that impact young people in schools, which are known to have a detrimental impact on academic performance. After discussing research and theory, participants will engage in practical application of HHSWT and draw conclusions in regards to how to best implement learned tools/strategies into their own practice.  

3 Ways to Face Your White Privilege in the Classroom

Jamila Lyiscott, Teachers College

Tues, 7/19 pm

The present-day Black Lives Matter movement and cry for racial justice have pervaded our nation's schools and college campuses in ways that call true educators to the responsibility of addressing racial inequality in their classrooms. However, even the most well-intentioned educators within a predominantly white teaching force are faced with the dilemma and discomfort of seeing, acknowledging, and wrestling with their own white privilege as an essential step toward justice. In this interactive workshop, participants will engage in activities and critical dialogue around white privilege to connect personal responsibility to pedagogical possibilities for the classroom. Drawing on her extensive racial justice work within predominantly white institutions, Dr. Lyiscott will offer three strategies for addressing white privilege on internal, interpersonal, and institutional levels.   

Reading, Writing, and Talk: Inclusive Teaching Strategies for Diverse Learners

Mariana Souto-Manning, Teachers College

Tues, 7/19, Wed 7/20, am & pm

This workshop will introduce a variety of inclusive strategies for teaching language and literacy in racially just ways. Participants will be invited into classrooms where diverse children’s experiences, strengths, and expertise are supported and valued. Examples will focus on oral language, reading, and writing development and include diverse possibilities for culturally relevant and inclusive teaching. Featured teaching strategies foster academic success, cultural competence, and critical consciousness—leading students to read their worlds and question educational and societal inequities. Early childhood and elementary teachers will find this workshop invaluable as they consider effective ways to teach racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse children. The vivid examples and hands-on strategies explored will help educators expand their thinking and repertoires regarding what is possible—and needed—in the language and literacy education curriculum. Resources and tools for enacting a literacy curriculum that fosters cultural competence, critical consciousness, and educational justice will be shared. Unique in its focus on equitable, fully inclusive, and culturally relevant language and literacy teaching, this workshop will help K-2 teachers rethink their own practice.

3 Ways to Engage Multiple Literacies in Your Classroom

Jamila Lyiscott, Teachers College

Wed, 7/20, pm

Faced with the realities of a monolingual teaching force and an increasingly diverse student body, this workshop problematizes traditional notions about what it means to be "literate" in our 21st Century world. Participants will draw on personal narratives and critically reflect on our capacity to disrupt racial/social inequity through attention to language and race as ideologically interwoven. Drawing on her dissertation research and extensive experience as an educator of racially and ethnically diverse youth, Dr. Lyiscott will offer three pedagogical strategies for engaging multiple literacy practices in your classroom.

Race, Dis/ability and Equity Pedagogies

Michelle Knight-Manuel and Laura Vernikoff, Teachers College

Wednesday 7/20, pm

The purpose of this workshop is to engage participants in examining the connections between race and dis/ability in education, and to explore how culturally relevant (Knight & Marciano, 2013; Ladson-Billings, 1995) and inclusive pedagogies (Valle & Connor, 2011) address the opportunity gap within schools and classrooms. Many people are aware that disproportionality is a persistent problem in special education, with White children being underrepresented in several high-incidence disability categories that get diagnosed in schools such as "learning disabled" and "emotionally disturbed" compared to their overall representation among children and youth. Researchers have noted that disproportionality does not exist within low-incidence categories that get identified before children start school, such as "blind" or "deaf." As a result, researchers have argued that the disproportional overrepresentation of Black, American Indian, and sometimes Latina/o children in special education classes results from school practices such as the inequitable distribution of resources (cf. Eskanazi, Eddins, & Beame, 2003), opportunities to learn (Milner, 2010) and culturally irrelevant curricula (Blanchett, 2006). We seek to address these issues through mediated student voice videos and interactive discussion in the workshop.

 

 

 

 

 

Student Assignment for Diversity in the 21st Century

David Tipson, New York Appleseed

Thursday 7/21, am & pm

Contrary to popular belief, school districts may still pursue racial and economic integration in their schools.  This session will cover developments in student assignment for racial and economic diversity since the 2007 U.S. Supreme Court Case Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 – particularly as they have played out in New York State.  Participants will learn not only about current legal and technical aspects of student assignment, but will discuss among themselves complex ideological and moral issues such as the tensions between integration and inclusion and how “diversity” and “integration” are defined.

The Missing Link: How Diverse Public Schools Can Measure Non-Academic Outcomes

Penny Wohlstetter, Teachers College

Thursday 7/21, am & pm

Through this workshop, participants will gain skills for surveying their school communities -- parents, students, and teachers. The workshop will emphasize surveys that measure non-academic outcomes (as required by ESSA), including School Climate, Parent and Student Engagement, and Social Emotional Learning. In line with the conference theme, special attention will be given to surveys that measure teaching and learning in diverse schools.

Leading for Integration

Jill Bloomberg, Park Slope Collegiate School

Thurs 7/21, am & pm

This workshop will explore how school leaders - both administrators and teachers - can give leadership to building both theoretical and practical support for integration by focusing on anti-racism. We will discuss some of the real-life challenges and responses of an integrating secondary school in Brooklyn and explore short texts that have facilitated conversations in the school community about race and racism.

Redefining Parent Roles and Power within Schools

Richard Gray and Zakiyah Ansari, Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University

Thurs, 7/21, am & pm

In this session, parents, teachers and administrators will explore the critical leadership role parents and communities can play in transforming schools and the roles parents and communities play within them. Using education organizing as a framework, the session will: 1) Examine the relationships, conversations, supports and information that help parents and communities understand the world inside the schools; 2) Show how these organizing efforts confront and shift the race, class, and power dynamics that often limit traditional parent engagement models; 3) Describe the structures and supports needed to help parents become active and powerful leaders in defining their own roles in the educational lives of their children and the schools serving them. 

Nothing For Us, Without Us: Youth Leadership in Transforming Education

Kesi Foster, Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University

Thurs, 7/21 am

In a moderated panel format with a Q&A, youth from New York City will talk about the role young people should play in shaping curriculum, school discipline, college access, and local and citywide policies. From leading Restorative Justice efforts to working as peer College Advisors, youth across the city are leading efforts to bring genuine youth leadership into schools. Youth will share experiences, solutions, and barriers they face in taking a leadership role in changing their schools and public education. 

Keynote Speakers Include:

Glenn E. Singleton, Racial Equity Leader, Author, Educator and Creator of Courageous Conversations About Race (2006), a protocol for sustained, deep dialog, and Beyond Diversity™, the curriculum that has taught hundreds of thousands of people how to use it. Singleton is President and Founder of Pacific Educational Group, Inc. (PEG), an agency that has developed racially conscious leaders in a variety of sectors, including education.

Dr. Sonia Nieto, has devoted her professional life to questions of diversity, equity, and social justice in education. She is the leading expert on multicultural education, teacher education, and the education of students of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Nieto is the author of Finding Joy in Teaching Students of Diverse Backgrounds: Culturally Responsive and Socially Just Practices in U.S. Classrooms (2013).

Featured Speaker:

Ali Michael is the Director of K-12 Consulting and Professional Development at the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania and the Co-Founder and Director of the Race Institute for K-12 Educators. Ali earned her BA in African studies and political science at Williams College, her MA in anthropology and education from Teachers College and her PhD in teacher education from the University of Pennsylvania. She received her education as an activist and a facilitator from Training for Change and Whites Confronting Racism. She is the author of Raising Race Questions: Whiteness, Inquiry and Education (Teachers College Press, 2015): a book designed to support teachers in the long term and personal process of understanding the role that race plays in their lives and in their classrooms. She is also co-editor of Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice: 15 Stories (2015, Stylus Press) and The White Women’s Guide to Teaching Black Boys (Forthcoming, Corwin). She sits on the editorial board of the journal Whiteness and Education. She and her partner, Michael, live in Philadelphia and consider questions of race and education on a daily basis in the raising of their two children.

Workshop Leaders Include:

Teachers College, Columbia University faculty will be speaking and leading workshops, including:

  • Christopher Emdin, Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology
  • Michelle Knight-Manuel, Department of Curriculum and Teaching
  • Felicia Mensah, Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology
  • Detra Price-Dennis, Department of Curriculum and Teaching
  • Carolyn Riehl, Department of Education Policy and Social Analysis
  • Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, Department of Arts and Humanities
  • Mariana Souto-Manning, Department of Curriculum and Teaching
  • Amy Stuart Wells, Department of Education Policy and Social Analysis

Read below to learn what other interested participants are asking about our Summer Institute.

1. What will be covered during this program, and who is the target audience for the program?

“Reimagining Education: Teaching and Learning in Racially Diverse Schools, Summer Institute 2016” is a professional development institute designed primarily for teachers, school administrators, district officials, parents, and graduate students in education.

As the demographics of the nation shift rapidly we see families of color moving to once all-white suburbs and white, non-Hispanic families moving into gentrifying pockets of cities. The result is a growing number of diverse communities and public schools. The challenge to educators all over the country today is to at long last create truly integrated public schools that tap into the educational benefits of racially diverse schools and classrooms. Our summer institute will demonstrate how public schools can fulfill this mission to better prepare all students for the 21st Century.

Our institute will include keynote speakers, panelists, workshops, and dialogue sessions centered on addressing racial diversity in changing schools and classrooms. We acknowledge that diversity goes beyond professional development and requires educators to address their own individual multicultural biases. Our goal is to help foster the personal and professional growth of participants by exploring diversity through the themes of racial literacy, pedagogy, and critical leadership.

2. What is the structure of the conference? Are there many workshops? Is it a seminar structure? Is there reading?

The structure includes a mix of speakers, panels, workshops, and dialogue sessions. The first day will provide an introductory overview of the institute with keynote speakers, panels, dialogue sessions and a student performance group. Tuesday-Thursday of the Institute will be a mix of speakers, panels, workshops, dialogue sessions and student performance groups. Each participant will have the opportunity to attend six workshops each.

Workshop Topics Include:
Racial Literacy in Diverse Classrooms: Examining the Counter-Narrative
How Race is Constructed in Children’s Literature
Science Instruction in Diverse Classrooms
Social Studies for All
Leadership in Racially Diverse Schools
Student Assignment Policies for Equity
Parent Engagement and Constituency Building for Diversity

Enrolled Institute Participants can begin enrolling in their workshop on our website on June 1, 2016.

The four day schedule will be posted in March.

Reading materials and other resources will be posted on the website for participants to download and keep.

3. What is the cost of the program?

The registration fee for the four-day Institute is $795, with a 10% early bird discount for registration before April 15, 2016. Participants can earn (3) Continuing Education Units (CEUs) through Teachers College’s Department of Continuing Professional Studies.

Matriculating graduate students – from TC or other schools of education -- can enroll in one of the Summer B, 3-unit courses tied to the Institute, including EDP 4199: Special Topics Course: Reimagining Education for Teaching and Learning in Diverse Schools: A Policy Perspective. Please contact the Office of the Registrar for more information.

Registration includes breakfast and lunch for all four days as well as two receptions. To register for “Reimagining Education: Teaching and Learning in Racially Diverse Schools”, please click here.

4. I am highly interested in this workshop but have a couple of lingering questions before registration. Who should I contact?

The institute welcomes any questions, inquiries, comments, or concerns of interested attendees. While the staff and faculty organizing and supporting the Institute are still within the stages of planning final details, inquiries do not go unnoticed. We will also regularly update the FAQ section for the Summer Institute on our website under the Center for Understanding Race and Education, coming soon.

For any inquiries, please contact Ann Lobue, Institute Coordinator, at al3328@tc.columbia.edu, or Tracy Vadakumchery, Administrative Coordinator for the Center for Understanding Race and Education (CURE), at (212) 678-3729 or at tjv2109@tc.columbia.edu. Please allow a one-week time frame for responses to inquiries.

5. I notice there is an emphasis on public school educators in the workshop description. I am a teacher at an urban private school with a diverse population. Will the content still be applicable even though I am currently employed in a private school?

Yes!! The “Reimagining Education” Summer Institute is designed to help all educators – in public, private, charter schools and higher education – learn how to create truly integrated public schools that tap into the educational benefits of racially diverse schools and classrooms. Our summer institute will demonstrate how public schools can fulfill this mission to better prepare all students for the 21st Century.

Our institute will include keynote speakers, panelists, workshops, and dialogue sessions centered on addressing racial diversity in changing schools and classrooms. We acknowledge that diversity goes beyond professional development and requires educators to address their own individual multicultural biases. Our goal is to help foster the personal and professional growth of participants by exploring diversity through the themes of racial literacy, pedagogy, and critical leadership.

6. I am traveling to New York City to attend the Summer Institute.  Where can I stay?

In an effort to assist you with your search for accommodations, we have listed several hotels (click on "other accommodations") you might consider. A train/cab ride away from Teachers College, all of these hotels are located on the Upper West Side (UWS) of New York City. Attractions in close proximity to these accommodations include: the Planetarium, Cathedral of St. John the Divine, Children’s Museum of Manhattan, Lincoln Center, The Museum of Natural History, and Central Park.  

Teachers College and Union Theological Seminary also offer housing during the summer months for a nominal fee. These rooms are within a short walking distance from campus.

To learn more about Guest Housing, visit this webpage: https://www.tc.columbia.edu/housing/guest-and-conference-housing/guest-housing/.

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July 5, 2016 - July 10, 2016

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School Law Institute
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