nprEd interviews Travis Bristol, Ph.D. 2014 in Education Policy, Oct. 20, 2015. | Education Policy & Social Analysis

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
Teachers College, Columbia University
Printer-friendly Version
Teachers College, Columbia University Logo
ESPA Banner

Education Policy & Social Analysis

nprEd interviews Travis Bristol, Ph.D. 2014 in Education Policy, Oct. 20, 2015.

"Keeping Black Men in Front of the Class" by Elissa Nadvorny. 

Bristol Travis, a Ph.D. in Education Policy at the EPSA department, now a fellow at Stanford's Center for Opportunity Policy in Education, designed a study that asked: what can be done in classrooms and break rooms to improve retention? For answers, he designed a survey for black male public school teachers in Boston. Just last month, a new study found that the number of black teachers in the public schools of nine cities dropped between 2002 and 2012. In Washington, D.C., black teachers' share of the workforce dropped from 77 percent to 49 percent. Travis is trying to figure out why black men are leaving the profession. He himself taught high school English in New York City public schools; there he grew interested in designing policies that would support his male students, particularly boys of color. 

Read the full interview HERE

Published Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015

nprEd interviews Travis Bristol, Ph.D. 2014 in Education Policy, Oct. 20, 2015.

"Keeping Black Men in Front of the Class" by Elissa Nadvorny. 

Bristol Travis, a Ph.D. in Education Policy at the EPSA department, now a fellow at Stanford's Center for Opportunity Policy in Education, designed a study that asked: what can be done in classrooms and break rooms to improve retention? For answers, he designed a survey for black male public school teachers in Boston. Just last month, a new study found that the number of black teachers in the public schools of nine cities dropped between 2002 and 2012. In Washington, D.C., black teachers' share of the workforce dropped from 77 percent to 49 percent. Travis is trying to figure out why black men are leaving the profession. He himself taught high school English in New York City public schools; there he grew interested in designing policies that would support his male students, particularly boys of color. 

Read the full interview HERE

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends
 
  • Apply
  • Request Info