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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Report by Professors Amy Stuart Wells and Doug Ready and EPSA Students and Alumnae Documents "Separate But Unequal" Suburban Schools

Report focuses on Nassau County, Long Island as one of "hundreds of suburban counties across the country." Published: 5/7/2014 2:56:00 PM

Prof. Luis Huerta quoted in Huffington Post's article, April 30

Prof. Luis Huerta shares his opinion in Joy Resmovits' article Charter Schools Get Less Money Than Public Schools. Is That A Problem?, posted in Huffington Post on April 30. Published: 5/1/2014 11:23:00 AM

EPSA announces winners of 2014-2015 Education Policy Dissertation Research Fellowships

EPSA department congratulates all the winners. And the WINNERS ARE: Published: 4/24/2014 12:08:00 PM

Basil Smikle, Ph.D. candicate in P&E in the NYT, April 17, 2014.

Basil Smilke, a political strategist and a Ph.D. candidate in the Politics and Education program, shares a short piece he wrote for the New York Times Room for Debate on Bloomberg's $50 million investment to fight gun control. Published: 4/22/2014 10:46:00 AM

EPSA Alumnae Speak at Reception for Admitted Students

EPSA extends warm thanks to alumnae, Dana Leon-Guerrero (Sociology & Education, 2010) and Lauren McDade (Politics & Education, 2013), who were featured speakers at TC's Washington DC Admit Reception on Wednesday, April 2. The reception, sponsored by the Office of Admission, allowed newly admitted students to meet with TC alumni and learn more about their academic and professional experiences. Published: 4/9/2014 12:48:00 PM

EPSA Faculty at AERA conference April 3-7, 2014

The faculty members of the department of Education Policy and Social Analysis will be participating and presenting at this year's AERA conference in Philadelphia, PA. Published: 4/2/2014 11:19:00 AM

Amy Stuart Wells: "Colorblind" Policies Harm Our Diverse Public Schools

In a new policy brief, Amy Stuart Wells writes that so-called "colorblind" educational policies work against diverse public schools. Published: 4/1/2014 8:08:00 PM

The Trouble with "Teacher Voice" by Jonathan Gyourko

Jonathan Gyurko received his Ph.D.in Education and Politics in 2012 from Teachers College Columbia University, where he serves as an adjunct assistant professor. He also runs Leeds Global Partners, an education consultancy. The article, published in the Spring 2014 edition of the Politics of Education Association Bulletin, draws on his dissertation research titled "Teacher Voice." Published: 3/26/2014 4:14:00 PM

Basil Smikle, P&E Ph.D. student, in the NYT, April 18

The Room for Debate section of the New York Times.

Too Concerned With Re-election to Compromise

Basil Smikle is a political strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

APRIL 18, 2013

President Obama’s rare public display of exasperation and animus after the defeat of bipartisan gun control in the Senate was unmistakable. He could only bemoan the handful of senators -- four of them Democrats -- derailing the hopes of 90 percent of America. Sadly, there are many reasons for the derailment of the gun bills, at the local level and by our legislative process.

The founding fathers were concerned about excessive and direct democracy and favored representative government, which proscribes simple majority influence on policy issues. Our Constitution and subsequent laws governing legislative processes have at times expanded or curtailed the influence of the legislative power. But even in a revered body like the Senate, the arcane rules -- like the filibuster -- undermine majority preferences instead of acquiescing to them.

Closer to home, the hard truth is that many legislators are concerned with re-election rather than building consensus around issues that preoccupy their constituents. Their election imperatives are fueled by the will of a few active voters and powerful interest groups.

Despite the trends that should indicate the opposite, research shows that political participation is declining in this country. Loopholes in campaign finance laws and the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United have encouraged organizations to infuse vulgar amounts of money and resources into campaigns. Unless we prevent senators from hiding behind parliamentary procedure and make them more responsive to the population, ordinary Americans will lose participatory power and suffer under the tyranny of the minority.
 

 

(4/18/2013)

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