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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

New hire: Sam Abrams, Director of NCSPE.

Congratulations and welcome to Sam Abrams, Director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education. Published: 11/7/2014 1:34:00 PM

Aaron Pallas in the Wall Street Journal

Professor Aaron Pallas is "cautiously optimistic" about Mayor de Blasio's vision for failing NYC schools, including the plan to have superintendents spend more time inside school buildings. Published: 11/5/2014 12:38:00 PM

Basil Smikle, Ph.D. candidate in P&E, in The Hill, September 30, 2014.

The Hill (thehill.com) is a top US political website, read by the White House and more lawmakers than any other site -- vital for policy, politics and election campaigns. Published: 10/29/2014 2:35:00 PM

Isaac Solano, M.A. student in Education Policy, in The Washington Post, Oct. 28, 2014

How I got out of poverty: -'I don't like to think of myself as an outlier' The story of how one young man went from one of the toughest neighborhoods in Denver to graduate school at Columbia University. Read the article here. Published: 10/28/2014 2:27:00 PM

Tom Bailey in Inside Higher Ed on Tuition-Free Plans at Community Colleges

Professor Tom Bailey Says that Tuition-Free Plans Could Prompt "Steep Tuition Hikes" at Community Colleges Published: 10/16/2014 10:12:00 PM

Aaron Pallas on NPR

Professor Aaron Pallas on NPR: Optional SAT is "Sensible," Especially for Colleges Seeking Diversity Published: 10/12/2014 8:31:00 PM

Amy Stuart Wells in The Atlantic

Professor Amy Stuart Wells writes in The Atlantic about Ferguson's lessons for the future of the suburbs. Published: 10/8/2014 12:17:00 PM

Amy Stuart Wells and Douglas Ready in The Washington Post.'s Answer Sheet. September. Sept. 8, 2014

America's Suburban Schools Facing new Pressures. One of the problems with many school reforms being implemented in schools today is that they are being done in isolation -'" from one another and from other policies that are necessary to actually allow the education changes to work. In the following post, two professors explain how housing policy affects America's suburban schools in a profound way. Amy Stuart Wells is a professor of sociology at Teachers College, Columbia University, and Douglas Ready is an associate professor of education policy at Teachers College. Wells leads the Center for Understanding Race and Education at Teachers College, founded in 2008 for research and outreach activities related to issues of race in educational institutions. Published: 9/8/2014 3:47:00 PM

Research by Di Xu and Xin Gong

Research by Economics and Education PhD alumna Di Xu and PhD student Xin Gong has found that household income in China is directly correlated to preschool attendance.

Writing with Wen-Jui Han of NYU's Silver School of Social Work, Xu and Gong found "a robust positive association between household income and preschool attendance in both rural and urban settings," according to an article published on the MedicalXPress website.

In the first study to employ rigorous methodology to examine the association between household income and preschool attendance with a Chinese sample, the authors calculate that a 10 percent boost in household income would bring close to a 1 percentage point increase in preschool attendance, or about 1 million more 3- to 6-year-old children in China.The findings are especially important because more than 70 percent of mothers in the 25–34 age range with children under the age of 6 in China work outside the home, suggesting that many who need childcare cannot afford it. Household income has consistently been shown to affect child care choices in both developed and developing countries.

"Our results show that millions of families in China face substantial financial constraints in their children's preschool attendance, particularly in rural areas. Taken together, our findings call for government investment to address this challenge. Our results also highlight the need for future research that evaluates the impacts of subsidies or income support programs for preschool attendance in China."

Read the article here.

(3/3/2015)

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