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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Aaron Pallas on NPR

Professor Aaron Pallas on NPR: Optional SAT is "Sensible," Especially for Colleges Seeking Diversity Published: 10/12/2014 8:31:00 PM

Amy Stuart Wells in The Atlantic

Professor Amy Stuart Wells writes in The Atlantic about Ferguson's lessons for the future of the suburbs. Published: 10/8/2014 12:17:00 PM

Amy Stuart Wells and Douglas Ready in The Washington Post.'s Answer Sheet. September. Sept. 8, 2014

America's Suburban Schools Facing new Pressures. One of the problems with many school reforms being implemented in schools today is that they are being done in isolation -'" from one another and from other policies that are necessary to actually allow the education changes to work. In the following post, two professors explain how housing policy affects America's suburban schools in a profound way. Amy Stuart Wells is a professor of sociology at Teachers College, Columbia University, and Douglas Ready is an associate professor of education policy at Teachers College. Wells leads the Center for Understanding Race and Education at Teachers College, founded in 2008 for research and outreach activities related to issues of race in educational institutions. Published: 9/8/2014 3:47:00 PM

Accounting For Higher Education Accountability: Political Origins of State Performance Funding for Higher Education by Kevin J. Dougherty, Rebecca S. Natow, Rachel Hare Bork, Sosanya M. Jones & Blanca E. Vega. TC Record. Sept. 2014.

Examination of the political origins of state performance funding for higher education in six states (Florida, Illinois, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington) and the lack of its development in another two states (California and Nevada). Published: 9/4/2014 1:17:00 PM

Basil Smikle, Ph.D. candidate in P&E on MSNBC, August 17, 2014.

Basil Smikle, a Ph.D. candidate in the Politics & Education program and a political strategist, participates in a panel discussing Gov. Jay Nixon's press conference in Ferguson, Missouri. MSNBC's Up with Steve Kornacki. August 17, 2014. Published: 8/19/2014 11:24:00 AM

Thomas Bailey attends White House Ceremony to Launch New TC Center on College Remediation

Thomas Bailey, George and Abby O'Neill Professor of Economics and Education, Launches New TC Center on College Remediation at White House Published: 8/14/2014 1:58:00 PM

Rachel Langlais, an alumna of the LPP program in the TNTP blog, July 10, 2014

Rachel Langlais, an alumna of the Leadership, Policy and Politics program, 2012, currently works as a Senior Program Manager on the Partnerships and Research team at The New Teacher Project. Recently, Rachel, together with a co-writer, has published an entry on a TNTP blog titled "Embracing our own big data." Published: 7/28/2014 1:16:00 PM

Travis Bristol, Ph.D. in Education Policy, a guest in a Radio Boston Podcast. July 11, 2014

Dr. Travis Bristol, a 2014 graduate of the Education Policy program at Teachers College, is a guest in Radio Boston podcast "How to Increase the Number of Black Male Teachers in Boston Public Schools." He discusses the subject with Hayden Frederick-Clarke, a public school teacher in Charlestown. Travis Bristol is also a former high school English teacher in New York City public schools and teacher educator for secondary English with the Boston Teacher Residency program. After graduating from TC, he has received a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education. He tweets @TJacksonBristol. Published: 7/14/2014 2:36:00 PM

Basil Smikle, P&E Ph.D. student, in the NYT, April 18

The Room for Debate section of the New York Times.

Too Concerned With Re-election to Compromise

Basil Smikle is a political strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

APRIL 18, 2013

President Obama’s rare public display of exasperation and animus after the defeat of bipartisan gun control in the Senate was unmistakable. He could only bemoan the handful of senators -- four of them Democrats -- derailing the hopes of 90 percent of America. Sadly, there are many reasons for the derailment of the gun bills, at the local level and by our legislative process.

The founding fathers were concerned about excessive and direct democracy and favored representative government, which proscribes simple majority influence on policy issues. Our Constitution and subsequent laws governing legislative processes have at times expanded or curtailed the influence of the legislative power. But even in a revered body like the Senate, the arcane rules -- like the filibuster -- undermine majority preferences instead of acquiescing to them.

Closer to home, the hard truth is that many legislators are concerned with re-election rather than building consensus around issues that preoccupy their constituents. Their election imperatives are fueled by the will of a few active voters and powerful interest groups.

Despite the trends that should indicate the opposite, research shows that political participation is declining in this country. Loopholes in campaign finance laws and the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United have encouraged organizations to infuse vulgar amounts of money and resources into campaigns. Unless we prevent senators from hiding behind parliamentary procedure and make them more responsive to the population, ordinary Americans will lose participatory power and suffer under the tyranny of the minority.
 

 

(4/18/2013)

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