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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Aaron Pallas Quoted in Huffington Post

Pallas Urges Caution on NCTQ Teacher-Absence Report Published: 6/12/2014 2:49:00 PM

Ryan Allen's podcast discussion with Kevin Dougherty and Vikash Reddy.

Ryan Allen, an M.A. student in the Politics & Education Program at Teachers College has recently become a new host for the New Books in Education, a part of the New Books Network, which is a non-profit that offers podcasts in every academic field. New Books in Education show provides interviews with authors about their new publications related to the education field. In this podcast, Ryan interviews Prof. Kevin Dougherty, an Associate Professor of Higher Education and Education Policy, and Vikash Reddy, a Ph.D. candidate in Education Policy. They discuss their book Performance Funding for Higher Education; What are the Mechanisms What are the Impacts. The book was published in July 2013 at Jossey-Bass. Published: 6/3/2014 11:35:00 AM

Parent Involvement Not Overrated in Children's Success, writes Professor Bergman

Professor Peter Bergman co-authored an opinion piece for CNN debunking reports that parent involvement adds little to student achievement. Published: 5/21/2014 2:54:00 PM

Study by Center Co-Directed by Professor Levin Finds MOOC Reality Not Yet Meeting High Expectations

Study by Center Co-Directed by Professor Levin Finds MOOC Reality Not Yet Meeting High Expectations Published: 5/15/2014 1:43:00 PM

Jill Bloomberg, Ph.D. student in Politics & Education program featured in the article on school integration in the New York Magazine.

Despite the New York City's problem of deeply segregated school system, the Park Slope Collegiate in Brooklyn is determined not to be put in the same box. Jill Bloomberg, the third year Ph.D. student in the Politics and Education Program at EPSA, has been the school's principal since summer 2004 and she has been determined to fight the race and class divide at her school from the beginning. The New York Magazine's article from April 23 tells the story of how she set up to achieve that with a group of teachers an parents. Published: 5/9/2014 11:14:00 AM

Report by Professors Amy Stuart Wells and Doug Ready and EPSA Students and Alumnae Documents "Separate But Unequal" Suburban Schools

Report focuses on Nassau County, Long Island as one of "hundreds of suburban counties across the country." Published: 5/7/2014 2:56:00 PM

Prof. Luis Huerta quoted in Huffington Post's article, April 30

Prof. Luis Huerta shares his opinion in Joy Resmovits' article Charter Schools Get Less Money Than Public Schools. Is That A Problem?, posted in Huffington Post on April 30. Published: 5/1/2014 11:23:00 AM

EPSA announces winners of 2014-2015 Education Policy Dissertation Research Fellowships

EPSA department congratulates all the winners. And the WINNERS ARE: Published: 4/24/2014 12:08:00 PM

Basil Smikle, P&E Ph.D. student, in the NYT, April 18

The Room for Debate section of the New York Times.

Too Concerned With Re-election to Compromise

Basil Smikle is a political strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

APRIL 18, 2013

President Obama’s rare public display of exasperation and animus after the defeat of bipartisan gun control in the Senate was unmistakable. He could only bemoan the handful of senators -- four of them Democrats -- derailing the hopes of 90 percent of America. Sadly, there are many reasons for the derailment of the gun bills, at the local level and by our legislative process.

The founding fathers were concerned about excessive and direct democracy and favored representative government, which proscribes simple majority influence on policy issues. Our Constitution and subsequent laws governing legislative processes have at times expanded or curtailed the influence of the legislative power. But even in a revered body like the Senate, the arcane rules -- like the filibuster -- undermine majority preferences instead of acquiescing to them.

Closer to home, the hard truth is that many legislators are concerned with re-election rather than building consensus around issues that preoccupy their constituents. Their election imperatives are fueled by the will of a few active voters and powerful interest groups.

Despite the trends that should indicate the opposite, research shows that political participation is declining in this country. Loopholes in campaign finance laws and the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United have encouraged organizations to infuse vulgar amounts of money and resources into campaigns. Unless we prevent senators from hiding behind parliamentary procedure and make them more responsive to the population, ordinary Americans will lose participatory power and suffer under the tyranny of the minority.
 

 

(4/18/2013)

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