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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

Meet Amanda Washington, Education Policy student at the EPSA department.

In TC People section of TC News, Joe Levine introduces M.A. degree student in Education Policy, Amanda Washington, where she talks about her interests, her family, her inspirations, her work, and her road to Teachers College. Published: 2/28/2014 10:27:00 AM

Jeff Henig quoted in Education Week from February 18, 2014.

"...political observers say that the common core, because of its intimate connection to the classroom, is likely to fail without strong teacher-'"and union-'"buy-in." Read the full article "Common-Core Tensions Cause Union Heartburn" in the Feb. 18 issue of Education Week. Published: 2/25/2014 2:23:00 PM

Jeff Henig on magnet schools, NYT. Feb. 16, 2014

In the NYT article "Magnet Schools Find a Renewed Embrance in Cities" Prof. Jeff Henig joins a discussion on how US urban districts, such as Miami, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Newark and Washington, are reconsidering magnet schools as traditional public schools come under increasing pressure from charter schools and vouchers for private schools. Published: 2/25/2014 2:10:00 PM

Michael Rebell on NY1 in news on universal Pre-K plan. NY1. Jan.27, 2014

Mayor Bill de Blasio says when it comes to universal pre-kindergarten, time is of essence. Prof. Michael Rebell joins the discussion on NY1 TV news. Published: 1/31/2014 12:06:00 PM

Amy Stuart Wells Elected to National Academy of Education

Amy Stuart Wells, Professor of Sociology and Education, who earned her Ph.D. from TC in 1991, is a leading authority on educational policy, race and education, charter schools, school desegregation, and school choice policy. Published: 1/23/2014 10:24:00 AM

Basil Smikle, Ph.D. candicate in P&E in the NYT, Dec. 30, 2013.

Basil Smikle is a political strategist and adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Published: 1/17/2014 12:27:00 PM

NY Times Op-Ed Cites TC's Levin Study of CUNY Program

Former TC Sachs lecturer David Kirp cites a study co-authored by Henry Levin, William H. Kilpatrick Professor of Economics and Education, which found that an academic and financial support program for one community college student costing $4,000 per year reaps "whopping" $200,000 in taxpayer benefits. Published: 1/14/2014 11:05:00 AM

Priscilla Wohlstetter: Helping Educators Implement the Common Core. Jan. 8, 2014

What is helping the Common Core succeed in NYC? Is New York City on track to ensure that the new Common Core standards will address academic achievement gaps and build skills like problem solving and persistence that also are crucial to college and career readiness? What steps should the next administration take to ensure this happens? Published: 1/10/2014 9:31:00 AM

Basil Smikle, P&E Ph.D. student, in the NYT, April 18

The Room for Debate section of the New York Times.

Too Concerned With Re-election to Compromise

Basil Smikle is a political strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

APRIL 18, 2013

President Obama’s rare public display of exasperation and animus after the defeat of bipartisan gun control in the Senate was unmistakable. He could only bemoan the handful of senators -- four of them Democrats -- derailing the hopes of 90 percent of America. Sadly, there are many reasons for the derailment of the gun bills, at the local level and by our legislative process.

The founding fathers were concerned about excessive and direct democracy and favored representative government, which proscribes simple majority influence on policy issues. Our Constitution and subsequent laws governing legislative processes have at times expanded or curtailed the influence of the legislative power. But even in a revered body like the Senate, the arcane rules -- like the filibuster -- undermine majority preferences instead of acquiescing to them.

Closer to home, the hard truth is that many legislators are concerned with re-election rather than building consensus around issues that preoccupy their constituents. Their election imperatives are fueled by the will of a few active voters and powerful interest groups.

Despite the trends that should indicate the opposite, research shows that political participation is declining in this country. Loopholes in campaign finance laws and the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United have encouraged organizations to infuse vulgar amounts of money and resources into campaigns. Unless we prevent senators from hiding behind parliamentary procedure and make them more responsive to the population, ordinary Americans will lose participatory power and suffer under the tyranny of the minority.
 

 

(4/18/2013)

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