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Education Policy and Social Analysis
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Education Policy and Social Analysis

News from EPSA

NY Times Cites Peter Bergman's Study

The NY Times story, "Helping the Poor in Education: The Power of a Simple Nudge," cites Professor Bergman's work with a Los Angeles school sending personalized text messages to parents of middle and high school students. Published: 1/19/2015 1:30:00 PM

Thomas Bailey Widely Quoted in Major Media Outlets on President Obama's Proposed Community College Plan

Professor Bailey was quoted in multiple news stories about President Obama's proposed plan to offer students two years of free tuition at community colleges, including those in the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Published: 1/11/2015 5:39:00 PM

USA Today Story on Diversity Quotes Amy Stuart Wells

Professor Wells states that consciously bringing together students of different races is useful and that putting kids in segregated schools "is not good preparation for the 21st century." Published: 1/11/2015 5:24:00 PM

Jeffrey Henig's lecture at the University of Virginia on The Politics of Educational Research. Dec. 5, 2014.

EPSA's Jeffrey Henig spoke on "The Politics of Educational Research" on Friday December 5th, 2014 as part of the Curry Research Lectureship Series at the University of Virginia. Drawing on the research he undertook in writing his book Spin Cycle, he explained the political dimensions of education research as they play out in controversial areas like market-based reform, high stakes testing and teacher assessment. Published: 12/19/2014 12:09:00 PM

EPSA leads a conference on the VERGARA, DAVIDS, AND WRIGHT case. Dec.3. 2014

On December 3rd, Teachers College, Columbia University hosted a national conference that focused on the Vergara, Davids, and Wright cases, which concern the impact of teacher tenure on low-'income and minority students. Panels included both supporters and critics of the Vergara/Wright approach. Published: 12/19/2014 11:39:00 AM

Luis Huerta in the New York Times, Dec. 11, 2014.

"Policy makers should resist being seduced by achievement scores and, instead, hold charter schools accountable and aligned with the long-standing purpose of public schools." Prof. Huerta's article High-Suspension Rates at Charter Schools Don't Help Students appeared in the Opinion Pages, Room for Debate of the NYT on Dec. 11, 2014. Published: 12/11/2014 3:29:00 PM

Basil Smikle, P&E Ph.D. student, in the NYT, April 18

The Room for Debate section of the New York Times.

Too Concerned With Re-election to Compromise

Basil Smikle is a political strategist and an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

APRIL 18, 2013

President Obama’s rare public display of exasperation and animus after the defeat of bipartisan gun control in the Senate was unmistakable. He could only bemoan the handful of senators -- four of them Democrats -- derailing the hopes of 90 percent of America. Sadly, there are many reasons for the derailment of the gun bills, at the local level and by our legislative process.

The founding fathers were concerned about excessive and direct democracy and favored representative government, which proscribes simple majority influence on policy issues. Our Constitution and subsequent laws governing legislative processes have at times expanded or curtailed the influence of the legislative power. But even in a revered body like the Senate, the arcane rules -- like the filibuster -- undermine majority preferences instead of acquiescing to them.

Closer to home, the hard truth is that many legislators are concerned with re-election rather than building consensus around issues that preoccupy their constituents. Their election imperatives are fueled by the will of a few active voters and powerful interest groups.

Despite the trends that should indicate the opposite, research shows that political participation is declining in this country. Loopholes in campaign finance laws and the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United have encouraged organizations to infuse vulgar amounts of money and resources into campaigns. Unless we prevent senators from hiding behind parliamentary procedure and make them more responsive to the population, ordinary Americans will lose participatory power and suffer under the tyranny of the minority.
 

 

(4/18/2013)

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