Farber, Barry A. (bf39) | Teachers College Columbia University

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Farber, Barry
Professor of Psychology and Education
Editor, Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session
Counseling & Clinical Psychology
212-678-3125

Office:
328 HMann

Educational Background

B.A., Queens College, CUNY; M.A., Teachers College; Ph.D., Yale University

Scholarly Interests

Psychotherapy research (attachment theory and object relations; therapist and patient representations; self-disclosure and concealment in patients, therapists, supervisors, and supervisees); the influence of emerging technologies (e.g., texting, blogging, emails, social media) on self-disclosure in children and adolescents; Carl Rogers and person-centered therapy (e.g., varieties and consequences of positive regard).

Selected Publications


Self Disclosure in Psychotherapy (2006, Guilford)

The Psychotherapy of Carl Rogers
(1996, Guilford). 

"Attachment style, representations of psychotherapy, and clinical interventions with insecurely attached clients" (2015, Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session).

"Putting up emotional (Facebook) walls: Attachment status and emerging adults' experience of social networking sites" (2013, Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session).

"Client disclosure and therapist response in psychotherapy with women with a history of childhood sexual abuse" (2013, Psychotherapy Research).

"Positive Regard" (2011, Psychotherapy)

"The therapist as secure base" (In Obegi & Berant, 2009, Attachment theory and research in clinical work with adults)

"The benefits and risks of patient self-disclosure in the psychotherapy of women with a history of childhood sexual abuse" (2009, Psychotherapy)

"On the enduring and substantial influence of Carl Rogers' not-quite essential nor
 necessary conditions" (2007, Psychotherapy)

"Patterns  of self-disclosure in psychotherapy and marriage" (2007, Psychotherapy)

"A temporal model of patient disclosure in psychotherapy" (2007, Psychotherapy Research)

"Patient self-disclosure: A review of the research" (2003, Journal of Clinical Psychology)

"Positive regard" (2001, Psychotherapy)

"The therapist as attachment figure" (1995, Psychotherapy).

"Gender and representation in psychotherapy" (1994, Psychotherapy).
Professor Barry A. Farber received his Ph.D. from Yale University. Clinically, he has had training in behavioral, client-centered, and psychodynamically oriented psychotherapies. His research and scholarly interests are in the areas of psychotherapy process and outcome (e.g., the ways in which patients construct internal representations of the therapist and the therapeutic relationship; self-disclosure in patients, therapists, and supervisees; the nature and consequences of the therapist's provision of positive regard), the impact on the therapist of doing psychotherapy, the development of psychological-mindedness, and the ways in which interpersonal disclosure is influenced by emerging technologies (e.g., texting, emailing, blogging). He was Director of Training in the clinical program here for 21 years (1990-2011) and recently (2014) re-assumed that positon; he's currently the editor of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session. He's also on the Executive Committee of Division 29 (Psychotherapy) of the American Psychological Association.

Farber, B. A. (2006). Self-disclosure in psychotherapy. New York: Guilford.

Farber, B. A., Brink, D., & Raskin, P. (1996). The psychotherapy of Carl Rogers: Cases and commentary. New York: Guilford Publications.

--------------------

Farber, B.A., Feldman, S., & Wright, A. J. (2013). Client disclosure and therapist response in psychotherapy with a history of childhood sexual abuse. Psychotherapy Research.

Nitzburg, G. C., & Farber, B. A. (2013). Putting up emotional (Facebook) walls: Attachment status and emerging adults' experience of social networking sites. Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session.

Farber, B. A., Shafron, G., Hamadani, J., Wald, E., & Nitzburg, G. (2012). Children, technology, problems and preferences. Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session, 68, 1225-1229.

Khurgin-Botts, R., & Farber, B. A. (2011). Patients’ disclosures about therapy: Discussing therapy with spouses, significant others, and friends. Psychotherapy, 48, 330-335.

Farber, B. A., & Doolin, E. M. (2011). Positive regard. In J. Norcross (Ed.) Psychotherapy relationships that work (2nd edition) (pp. 168-186). New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Saypol, E., & Farber, B. A. (2010). Attachment style and patient disclosure in psychotherapy.

             Psychotherapy Research, 20, 462-471.

 

Geller, J. D., Farber, B. A., & Schaffer, C. E. (2010). Representations of the supervisory alliance

and the development of psychotherapists. Psychotherapy, 47, 211-220.

 

Elliott, R., & Farber, B. A. (2010). Carl Rogers: idealistic pragmatist and psychotherapy research

             pioneer. In L. G. Castonguay et al.   

 (Eds.), Bringing psychotherapy research to life: Understanding change through the work of

leading clinical researchers. Legacies from the Society of Psychotherapy Research (pp. 17-28). Washington, D. C.: APA Books.

 

Farber, B. A., Khurkin-Botts, R., & Feldman, S. (2009). The Benefits and risks of patient self-

disclosure in the psychotherapy of women with a history of childhood sexual abuse.

Psychotherapy, 46, 52-67.

 

Farber, B. A., & Metzger, J. (2009). The therapist as secure base. In J. H. Obegi & E. Berant

             (Eds.) Attachment theory and research in clinical work with adults (pp. 46-70). New York:

 Guilford.

 

Pattee, D., & Farber, B. A. (2008). Patients’ experiences of self-disclosure in psychotherapy: The

 effects of gender and gender-role identification. Psychotherapy Research, 18, 306-315.

 

Farber, B. A. (2007). On the enduring and substantial influence of Carl Rogers’ not-quite essential

nor necessary conditions. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, and Training, 44, 289-294.

 


 

Courses

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