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Health & Behavior Studies
Teachers College, Columbia University
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Group10 > 2009 APHA Student Research Award will go to Team of TC and Mailman Students

2009 APHA Student Research Award will go to Team of TC and Mailman Students


TC Health Education and Mailman School of Public Health students to receive the American Public Health Association’s Public Health Education and Health Promotion Section 2009 Student Research Award


A team of TC and Mailman School of Public Health students—Katie Hornung, Diana Cardona, Xiaomeng Li, and Amy Patel (Mailman)—are recipients of the American Public Health Association’s Public Health Education and Health Promotion Section (PHEHP) 2009 Student Research Award for their work on the Harlem Fruit Project, a social marketing campaign to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among adolescents in the Harlem neighborhoods of New York City.

The Harlem Fruit Project was created in a course on Social Marketing and Health Communication, taught by Dr. Ray Marks, Adjunct Associate Professor of Health Education at TC.  The Harlem Fruit Project focuses on Harlem adolescents, 13-18 years of age, in Central and East Harlem.  Using a counter-marketing strategy to inform its main objectives, the project aims to make healthy eating fashionable among adolescents by altering attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs about healthy eating.  The project also aims to address the larger barriers to healthy eating by empowering Harlem youth to take action in changing their food environment.  Through increased fruit and vegetable consumption, the Harlem Fruit Project seeks to reduce or prevent obesity, overweight, and the development of chronic disease among adolescents, particularly in racial and ethnic minorities.

The Harlem Fruit Project has partnered with the Harlem Health Promotion Center (HHPC) at Columbia, one of 33 Prevention Research Centers funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The partnership with HHPC houses the Harlem Fruit Project within an established community-based organization that shares its concern for the health and well-being of Harlem residents.  An internship/practicum program has been established between TC, Columbia University, and HHPC in order to support implementation of the project.

The Harlem Fruit Project team will receive their award during a special poster session at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA) in November in Philadelphia.  Additionally, they will be making a presentation at the Society for Public Health Education’s (SOPHE) Annual Meeting, which is held in conjunction with the APHA meeting.



Please email harlemfruitproject@gmail.com and visit www.gethealthyharlem.org for more information and to view the Harlem Fruit Project profiles on Facebook.