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Tuesday, October 13
TIAA-Cref one-on-one financial meetings 8:30am - 4:30pm • 203 Russell Hall
 
Fall Film Series: Naim and Jabar 4:00pm - 5:00pm • 2nd Floor, Russell Hall

Naim and Jabar
, a film within the Faces of Change Collection from Documentary Educational Resources, follows the friendship of two teenage Afghan boys, as it unveils the nuances of family structure; formal and informal learning; and broader educational policies. Originally filmed in the town of Aq Kupruk, some 320 miles northwest of Kabul, the documentary produced in 1974 offers a compelling view of rural society and schooling in Afghanistan. This series of documentary films highlight timely international perspectives on education and tie in with current programs of study and research at Teachers College. Please RSVP for this Event with Jennifer Govan at 212-678-3022, govan@tc.edu or http://library.tc.columbia.edu/.
 
 
In’s & Out’s of Teacher Certification 4:00pm - 5:00pm • 400 Russell Hall
 
Learn all there is to know about the teacher certification process and reciprocity. Open to all students seeking teacher certification. Questions? Call 212.678.3502 or email ote@tc.edu.
 
 
Poetry: Gretchen Mattox, Paula Meehan & Alicia Ostriker 7:00pm - 8:00pm • Barnard Campus, Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
Gretchen Mattox is the author of two books of poetry, Goodnight Architecture—“candid, agile, and beautiful,” as Cyrus Cassells has noted—and Buddha Box, winner of the Green Rose Prize. One of the leading Irish poets of her generation, Paula Meehan (below) is the author of more than seven books of poetry, including two short-listed for the Irish Times/Aer Lingus Irish Literature Prize for Poetry, The Man Who Was Marked by Winter and Pillow Talk, as well as the recent Painting Rain. Alicia Ostriker has published 11 volumes of poetry, including The Imaginary Lover, winner of the William Carlos Williams Award, No Heaven, and The Book of Seventy. Ostriker’s critical work includes Stealing the Language: the Emergence of Women’s Poetry in America.
 
 
Wednesday, October 14
 
Seminar: Norwegian Research and Education Network Visit 12:00pm - 1:30pm • 5th Floor, Russell Hall
 
Researchers from the Norwegian Research and Education Network will visit the EdLab Seminar to exchange information on their current work and TC’s.
 
 
Communication, Computing and Technology in Education (CCTE) Open House 7:00pm - 9:00pm • 305 Russell Hall
 
CCTE at Teachers College provides a cluster of degree programs for students who seek to develop leadership capacities in the use of information and communication technologies in education. Learn more about the program’s structure, faculty and course offerings, including the Online M.A. program. To RSVP or for other Open House information, visit www.tc.edu/MST/OpenHouse or contact Deanna Ghozati at dg2117@columbia.edu. For Communication, Computing and Technology in Education Program information visit: www.tc.edu/MST/CCTE/.
 
 
Lecture with Maja Horn - Who Killed Oscar Wao? Migration, Masculinity and Other Dominican Matters 7:00pm - 8:00pm • Barnard Campus, Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
The eponymous hero of Junot Díaz’s award-winning novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, moves, like many Dominicans, back and forth between the U.S., where his family made their new home, and the island nation they left behind. Maja Horn examines the implications of Oscar’s untimely death during one of these return trips and suggests how the incident speaks to changes brought about by migration in Dominican society, as well as to the perpetuation of certain troublesome political and social patterns on the island. Maja Horn is Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures at Barnard College.
 
 
Thursday, October 15
 
Comedy Night
 
For more information email student-senate@tc.columbia.edu.
 
Booktalk: Someone Else’s Face in the Mirror, Identity and the New Science of Face Transplants with John Broughton 4:00pm - 6:00pm 305 Russell Hall
 
Carla Bluhm and Nate Clendenin will present their new book, which takes an intriguing look at the psychomedical-cultural development and benefits, as well as the psychological challenges, of the newest in reconstructive surgery—face transplants. During this lively and perhaps even surprising event, the discovery of educational surgery will be discussed, and perhaps even demonstrated.
 
 
Just Hair? Women, Politics, Passion and Fashion - A panel discussion with Ayana Byrd, Anne Kreamer, and Atoosa Rubenstein ‘93, moderated by Janet Jakobsen 6:30pm - 7:30pm • Barnard Campus, The James Room, 4th Floor Barnard Hall
 
Long, short, sleek, bold, kinky, natural, covered or shaved—no matter how you cut it, women’s hair is a frequent topic of conversation. But why all the fuss? How far-reaching are the decisions women make about style, dye and hair product? And what do our preferences reveal about our deepest desires and fears? Janet Jakobsen, Director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women, will guide us as we untangle the meanings of hair and beauty. Panelists include Ayana Byrd, author of Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America; Anne Kreamer, author of Going Gray: What I Learned About Beauty, Sex, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters; and Atoosa Rubenstein, former Editor-in-Chief of Seventeen magazine and founding editor of CosmoGIRL!
 
Access and Affordability in Independent Schools: Financial Aid in an Age of Overstretched Budgets 5:30pm - 6:30pm • Columbia University School and Child Care Search Service Office, 516 West 112 Street (Broadway & Amsterdam)
 
Learn about the factors that financial aid officers consider in determining how to allocate an independent school’s financial aid budget. For further information regarding this event, please contact Orli Bander by emailing ob2127@columbia.edu or calling (212) 851-1897.
 
 
Friday, October 16
 
Last day to deposit final copies of Ed.D. or Ph.D. dissertations with the Office of Doctoral Studies for the October 21 award of the degree.
 
Doctoral Certification Examination (Ed.D./Ph.D.) for students not majoring in an area of psychology, 9:00am to 12noon and 1:45pm to 4:45pm.

A Special Conference in Honor of John Dewey’s 150th Birthday
 
Friday, October 16, 2009 9:00am - 5:30pm 179 Grace Dodge Hall
A special conference with Keynote speaker, Larry Hickman, Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for Dewey Studies, Southern Illinois University. Also joining will be myriad professors from TC, Columbia and other universities including Provost Tom James, David Hansen, Megan Laverty, William Gaudelli, Philip Kitcher, Wayne Proudfoot, Carol Rovane, Terri Wilson, Michael Fuerstein, Olga Hubard, Isaac Levi, Lydia Goehr along with CU and TC graducate students in the Philosophy Outreach Program. The conference is sponsored by: The Office of the Provost, Teachers College; the Office of the Provost, Columbia University; Heyman Center for the Humanities, Columbia University; The Journal of Philosophy; and Columbia University’s Department of Philosophy. This is a free event, but a reservation is required to attend. For more information, please email hkb2109@columbia.edu.
 
 
South Asia Institute (SAI) conference: Caste and Contemporary India 9:00am - 6:00pm • Morningside Campus, International Affairs Building, Room 1501
 
SAI presents a two-day conference in honor of the Columbia alumnus Dr. B. R. Ambedkar entitled, “Caste and Contemporary India.” Co-sponsored by: Center for Human Rights Documentation and Research; Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race; Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Culture; Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life; and Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy. Made possible by additional funding from the Dr. Ambedkar International Mission Inc. U.S.A; Office of the Provost (Columbia); Taraknath Das Foundation; and the U.S. Department of Education. Featuring a conversation with Columbia University President Lee Bollinger on “Affirmative Action, Law and Inequality in India and the United States,” with Pratap Mehta, Marc Galanter and moderator Nicholas Dirks. Participants will include: Gnana Alyosius (New Delhi); Janaki Bakhle (History; Director, South Asia Institute); Lee Bollinger (President, Columbia University); Nicholas Dirks (Anthropology and History; Vice-President and Dean, Arts & Science); Masood Alam Falahi (Maulana Azad National Urdu University); Marc Galanter (University of Wisconsin); Gopal Guru (Jawaharlal Nehru University); Rajkumar Hans (University of Baroda); Christophe Jaffrelot (Sciences-Po, CERI); Pratap Mehta (Centre for Policy Research, Delhi); Smita Narula (New York University); Balmurli Natrajan (William Patterson University); Gyan Pandey (Emory University); Sudha Rani (Ambedkar Open University); Anupama Rao (History); Nathaniel Roberts (University of Pennsylvania); Jebaroja Singh (William Patterson University); Sivakami Palanimuthu (Chennai); Anand Teltumbde (Mumbai); and Gauri Viswanthan (English & Comparative Literature). Please visit the South Asia Institute, www.sai.columbia.edu, for a complete schedule of panels. For further information regarding this event, please contact Bill Carrick by sending email to wac2112@columbia.edu.
 
 
Saturday, October 17

Columbia University Homecoming 2009 Homecoming Carnival - 11:00am-3:00pm Pregame Picnic - 11:00am-1:30pm Football: Columbia vs. Penn - 1:30pm
 
All members of the Columbia community are invited to participate in the annual Columbia Homecoming Carnival with face painting, balloon making, magic, games, prizes and interactive activities. Enjoy a hearty barbecue buffet lunch with alumni, parents, students and friends before cheering the Lions on to victory over Penn! Picnic tickets are available for purchase online through Thursday, October 15 and also are available on site. Fans of all ages are welcome at this family-friendly celebration. To purchase football tickets, please call 888-LIONS-11 or purchase online: www.gocolumbialions.com/tickets.
 
 
Monday, October 19
 
Book Talk: This Is Where I Want to Be, with Lou Cristillo, Erick Gordon and Student Contributors 4:00pm - 6:00pm • 305 Russell Hall
 
Join Dr. Louis Abdellatif Cristillo, Lecturer and Director of the Muslim Youth in NYC Public School Study of Teachers College, Columbia University; Erick Gordon, founder and director of the Student Press Initiative; and several student contributors as they discuss their recent publication; counterbalance the post-9/11 stereotypes associated with Muslims in America; and highlight the need for fairness and justice in education. Omar Ahmad, a fifteen-year old Arab American of Palestinian ancestry in tenth grade at a high school in Manhattan; Contributers from a Queen's high school will be participating in the discussion.
 
Tuesday, October 20
 
Online MA program in Computing and Education Open House 7:00pm - 9:00pm • Location is Online
 
Faculty, administrators and students will be present online to speak about the program. A Teachers College Office of Admission representative will be present online to speak with prospective students and answer questions pertaining to the application or admission processes. Please note: participants who have sent an RSVP will receive an email with instructions on how to access the Online Open House. Deanna Ghozati at dg2117@columbia.edu for more information or visit www.tc.edu/mst/ccte.
 
Wednesday, October 21
 
Workshop on Presentation Skills 5:30pm - 7:00pm • 179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
This workshop session is sponsored by Teacher College’s Office of Career Services (TCCS). For more information, visit TC CareerNET at www.tc.edu/careerservices.
 
 
Award of October degrees and certificates. No ceremony.
 
Science Education Open House 7:00pm - 9:00pm • 305 Russell Hall
 
Science Education at Teachers College has a long and rich tradition of research, development and teacher education. Learn more about the program structure, faculty and course offerings, including the one year MA program. To RSVP or for other Open House information visit www.tc.edu/MST/OpenHouse or contact Deanna Ghozati at dg2117@columbia.edu. For Science Education Program information visit www.tc.edu/MST/ScienceEd.
 
 
Roslyn Silver ’27 Science Lecture by Melissa Franklin: A Lab of One’s Own: A Place to Measure the Broken Symmetries of This Particular Elegant Universe 6:30pm - 8:30pm • Barnard Campus, Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
This year’s Roslyn Silver ‘27 Science Lecture will be presented by Melissa Franklin, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics at Harvard University. An experimental particle physicist who studies hadron collisions produced by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, she works on looking for new particles, which can only be produced by colliding protons at very high energies. She will also be collaborating with 2000 other physicists on experiments using data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator, when the LHC is turned on this fall. Professor Franklin will discuss her research and its potential to answer questions about how these elementary constituents of matter come together to create more complex forces, including those forces that may have created the universe. She will also discuss the challenges in navigating the university and the international laboratory in order to make a contribution to this effort, and the importance of having “a lab of one’s own” to allow for independent thinking. Professor Franklin joined the Harvard faculty in 1989 and become the first woman to gain tenure in the department of physics in 1992. She will also discuss the challenges of navigating the university and the international laboratory systems in order to make a contribution to this effort, and the critical importance of having “a lab of one’s own.”
 
 
Thursday, October 22
 
Social-Organizational Psychology Open House • 6:00pm - 7:30pm
 
The Program in Social-Organizational Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University, will hold 3 Open Houses in the Fall semester. Prospective students will meet with faculty members, Dr. Sarah Brazaitis (M.A. Program Director and Lecturer) and Dr. Gina Buontempo (M.A. Program Advisor and Lecturer). Drs. Brazaitis and Buontempo will be providing information about our M.A. Program and answering any questions students have about the program. Students will also be able to meet representatives from our student-run consulting club, the Organization and Human Development Consulting Club (OHDCC). Please RSVP for this Event.
 
 
Book Talk: Global Perspectives 4:00pm - 6:00pm • 305 Russell Hall
 
Celebrating the theme of free expression in multiple languages through a series of talks this Fall, Maria Torres-Guzman will speak on Global Perspectives on Multilingualism: Unity in Diversity, a scholarly publication she co-edited with Joel Gomez (Teachers College Press, 2009). This timely volume contains essays by a host of international contributors on the value of multilingual schooling in countries undergoing significant curriculum change as a result of rapid political change. Please RSVP for this event with Jennifer Govan at govan@tc.edu.
 
 
Friday, October 23
 
Doctoral Certification Examination (Ed.D./Ph.D.) for students majoring in an area of psychology, 9:00a.m. to 12noon and 1:45p.m. to 4:45p.m.
 
 
Student Senate Meeting 6:00pm
 
For more information email student-senate@tc.columbia.edu.
 
 
Wednesday, October 28
 
The State of the College 3:30pm-5:00pm • Cowin Center Auditorium
 
Please join President Susan Fuhrman for the TC address. The Office for Diversity and Community will also present the Elaine Brantley Memorial Award for Community & Civility to the 2009 Honorees.
 
 
Thursday, October 29
 
Free Fallin’ Fest
 
For more information email student-senate@tc.columbia.edu.
 
 
Education Pioneers Information Session 5:00pm - 6:00pm • 179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
This information session is sponsored by Teacher College’s Office of Career Services (TCCS). For more information, visit TC CareerNET at www.tc.edu/careerservices.
 
 
Thursday-Friday, October 29 & 30
 
Workshop: Witness To Disaster: Comparative Histories of Earthquake Science & Response with Leonardo Seeber and Andrew Revkin 9:00am - 5:00pm • Barnard Campus
 
From Gujarat, India, in 2001 to San Francisco, California, in 1906, scholars of modern seismology and earthquake response track some of the most fearsome quakes across North and South America, Europe, China and Japan in order to gain a historical and cross-cultural perspective on natural disaster investigation and management. Dr. Leonardo Seeber of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory will provide the keynote address, reflecting on his career of socially engaged seismological field research across three continents and vastly different cultures. Andrew Revkin, The New York Times science journalist and author of the Dot-Earth blog, leads a question-and-answer session with Dr. Seeber. Information: dcoen@barnard.edu.
 
 
Monday, November 2
 
Last day to file or to renew an application, in the Registrar’s Office, for Master’s degrees and certificates to be awarded in February. (After this date, application may be filed only until November 16 upon payment of $25 late fee.)
 
 
Employee Seasonal Flu Shots 9:00am - 5:00pm
 
The College has tentatively arranged for on-campus seasonal flu shots (not H1N1-type vaccinations) for employees on September 21 and November 2. The following employees will be eligible to receive a vaccination: Full-time faculty; Full-time professional staff; Full-time employees covered by contracts with locals 707, 2110 and 32BJ; Part-time faculty and Instructional staff; and Part-time professional staff. Interim employees will not be eligible to receive a vaccination. Employees who can be vaccinated by their personal physician, especially those considered to be in a high-risk category, are encouraged to do so. Please call the Human Resources Department with any questions at 212-678-3175.
 
 
Lecture: Marinetti, Translator of Mallarmé 6:00pm - 7:00pm • Barnard Campus, Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
In this talk, Giuseppe Gazzola, a specialist of nineteenth century Italian literature who teachers at SUNY Stonybrook, will discuss the border crossings and literary connections between the Italian Futurist Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944) and the French symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé (1842-1898). In particular, Gazzola will read from and then discuss Marinetti’s unpublished translations of Mallarmé, with an eye to explaining how we can understand more about both poets via this textual trace of influence. Gazzola will also talk about the modern edition of these translations that he is currently preparing. The talk, sponsored by the Mellon Foundation, is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Professor Phillip John Usher (pusher@barnard.edu; 212-854-5321).
 
 
Tuesday, November 3
 
Educause Seminar: Collaborative (Re)Design

http://edlab.tc.columbia.edu/index.php?q=node/3052
 
 
TESOL/AL Web Journal Brown Bag Lunch Presentation 2 12:00pm - 1:30pm • 306 Russell Hall
 
Wednesday, November 4
 
Arts Administration Prospective Student Open House • 6:30pm - 8:30pm
 
For more information, or to RSVP, call 212-678-3268 or email artsadmin@tc.edu.
 
 
Lecture: Erotohistoriography 7:00pm - 8:00pm • New York University, The Great Room, 19 University Place

Elizabeth Freeman is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Davis. She specializes in American literature and gender/sexuality/queer studies, and her articles have appeared in numerous scholarly journals. Her second book, Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories, will be published by Duke University Press next year. Her talk will be drawn from this forthcoming project and frame the project of erotohistoriography—loosely, a project of encountering the past in which the body is an instrument—in terms of its place in a revised history of sexuality. It seeks to offer a revised history of sexuality by centering queer pleasures and proposing the body as site of historical encounter, in and across time. Through these encounters across time, we might get a glimpse of historically specific pleasures and ways of organizing a life that exceed the current cramped politics of same-sex marriage as end game of sexual liberation.
 
 
Thursday, November 5
 
New Employee & Faculty Orientation Part 3: Racial Microaggressions 10:00am - 12:00pm • 449 Grace Dodge Hall
 
This event is open to all employees, students and faculty members of Teachers College. Racial Microaggressions are brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color. Perpetrators of microaggressions are often unaware that they engage in such communications when they interact with racial/ethnic minorities. For more information, please contact: Lenore Karo at 212.678.3391 or karo@tc.columbia.edu.
 
 
Helen Pond McIntyre ‘48 Lecture: Should Religious Ethics Matter to Feminist Politics? with Saba Mahmood 6:30pm - 7:30pm • Barnard Campus, The James Room, 4th Floor Barnard Hall
 
Saba Mahmood, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California Berkeley and expert on issues of secularism, gender, and modernity within the context of Islamist movements in the Middle East and South Asia, will reflect on why ethical practice and forms of embodiment matter to questions of feminist politics and analysis. By engaging some common misreadings of her 2005 book Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject, which received the 2005 Victoria Schuck award from the American Association of Political Science, Mahmood urges feminist scholars to critically re-think the normative status accorded to secular conceptions of the self and body in contemporary debates about religion. Mahmood is the recipient of the 2007 Carnegie Corporation Scholar’s award, and the Frederick Burkhardt fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies (2009-10). Her current project focuses on the politics of religious freedom in the Middle East. The McIntyre lectureship, established in 2004 in honor of Barnard alumna Helen Pond McIntyre ’48, highlights the work of scholars who have made extraordinary contributions to the field of Women’s Studies. In past years, the lecture series has welcomed numerous feminist icons, including legal scholar Patricia Williams; human rights advocate Dorothy Q. Thomas; feminist science pioneer Anne Fausto-Sterling; and scholar and activist Angela Davis.
 
 
Friday, November 13

v i s i o n s
in N Y C
 
Video and Film Still Exhibition
 
November 2-13Macy Art Gallery
 
Festival Screening

Friday, November 13
Macy Art Gallery Milbank ChapelCowin Center
 
Exhibition & Screening Reception
 
Friday, November 136:00pm - 9:00pmMacy Art Gallery
 
Teachers College welcomes Visions in New York City: short films and videos through both a multiple venue screening of all selected films as well as an exhibition of stills. This premiere collection of short videos and films, focusing on the work of emerging artists and filmmakers of different nationalities, will provide an unprecedented and inclusive opportunity for artists to celebrate and share their unique voices and visions with the New York City audience through broadcasting on site, via Web cast and other media outlets. Visions in New York City is a project created by Maurizio Pellegrin, co-curator Heather Van Uxem Lewis, and the Board of Visions with the support of Teachers College and the Department of Arts and Humanities. A catalog is available. For more information, contact visionsinnyc@gmail.com
 
 
A lecture: Citizenship, Labor and the Biopolitics of the Bioeconomy: Recruiting Female Tissue Donors for Stem Cell Research, Catherine Waldby
 
6:30pm - 7:30pm • Barnard Campus, Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
Catherine Waldby is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy at The University of Sydney, Australia. In this presentation, Professor Waldby will explore the emerging tensions between women’s voluntary (public good) donation of reproductive tissues for stem cell research and the increasing resort to transactional forms of tissue procurement, for example egg sharing and egg vending. It will locate this tension in both a feminist biopolitical analysis and in the broader dynamics of the global bioeconomy.
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