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TC Expert Source Guide

TEACHERS COLLEGE FACULTY EXPERTS ON EDUCATION ISSUES

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND, FEDERAL AND STATE EDUCATION POLICY:
McCain says NCLB should be improved by increasing school accountability, local control of federal education money, and school choice. Obama wants to fully fund the law for the first time, improve assessment, and support, rather than punish, failing schools.  
  •  Thomas James, provost and dean of Teachers College (contact through Joe Levine, executive director of external affairs, 212-678-3176 or jlevine@tc.columbia.edu.
  • Michael Rebell, an attorney and the executive director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, can address school finance issues – how states have estimated costs of providing an adequate education to all students, and how they financed the changes (212-678-4144 or mar224@columbia.edu).
  • Professor Jeffrey Henig is a political scientist who has written extensively about the politics of school choice, federalism and education policy, urban politics and education, race and education policy. He is especially knowledgeable about school choice and privatization (Henig@tc.columbia.edu).
THE EFFECT OF NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND:
  • John P. Allegrante, professor of health education and an expert in health education policy, asserts that the law has effectively squeezed physical and health education out of K-12 curricula, two areas of instruction that directly affect students’ performance on standardized tests (contact through Joe Levine, executive director of external affairs, 212-678-3176 or jlevine@tc.columbia.edu).
  • Margaret Crocco, chair, Department of Arts & Humanities, believes that NCLB’s focus on reading and math has compromised instruction in the arts and humanities (contact through Patty Lamiell, director of media relations, 212-678-3979 or lamiell@tc.columbia.edu).
HISTORY OF EDUCATION, DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION, AND EDUCATION POLICY: 
  • Thomas James provost and dean of Teachers College and professor of history and education, is an expert in public policy and education and experiential learning (contact through Joe Levine, executive director of external affairs, 212-678-3176 or jlevine@tc.columbia.edu).

HIGH-STAKES TESTING, EDUCATION LAW: 
  • Jay P. Heubert is a professor of law and education at Teachers College and adjunct professor of law at Columbia Law School, where he teaches courses on education law and policy. He has also been chief counsel to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, a civil-rights lawyer with the U.S. Department of Justice, and a high school English teacher. In 1997-98, he directed a Congressionally-mandated study of high-stakes testing conducted by the National Academy of Sciences. (Contact through Patricia Lamiell, 212-678-3979 or lamiell@tc.columbia.edu)

EDUCATIONAL EQUITY AND THE LAW:
  • Michael A. Rebell is an attorney and executive director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, which promotes excellence in education and seeks to overcome the gap in educational access and achievement between advantaged and disadvantaged students throughout the United States. Rebell is an experienced litigator, administrator, researcher, and scholar in the field of education law (212-678-4144 or mar224@columbia.edu)
  • Jay P. Heubert, professor of law and education at Teachers College (through Patricia Lamiell, director of media relations, 212-678-3979 or lamiell@tc.columbia.edu)
EDUCATION FINANCE, COSTS OF REFORM; CHILDREN’S RIGHTS TO AN ADEQUATELY FUNDED EDUCATION: 
Obama believes No Child Left Behind should be fully funded, while McCain says federal funding should follow students to successful schools, including private schools and their own homes.
 
  • Michael Rebell, attorney and the executive director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College (212-678-4144; mar 224@columbia.edu)
  • Henry M. Levin, professor of economics and education and director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education at Teachers College, has done extensive research on the cost of providing adequate education to all students (HL361@columbia.edu;  212-678-3857).
  • Jeffrey Henig, professor of political science and education, has written extensively about the politics of school choice, federalism and education policy, urban politics and education, race and education policy. He is especially knowledgeable about school choice and privatization (Henig@tc.columbia.edu).
  • Luis A. Huerta, assistant professor of education, is an expert in school choice reforms and school finance policy, tuition tax credits and vouchers, and how school reforms affect equity and quality in schools (lah2013@columbia.edu or 212-678-4199)
EDUCATION ECONOMICS, SCHOOL VOUCHERS AND CHARTERS:
McCain says federal funding should follow students to successful public or private schools. Obama would consider school vouchers if research shows they improve student performance.
  • Henry M. Levin is a professor of economics and education and director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education, which provides independent, non-partisan information about privatization in education (HL361@columbia.edu; 212-678-3857)
SCHOOL CHOICE, SMALL SCHOOLS, TUITION TAX CREDITS AND VOUCHERS: 
  • Luis A. Huerta, assistant professor of education, is an expert in school choice reforms and school finance policy, and how school reforms affect equity and quality in schools (lah2013@columbia.edu or 212-678-4199).
SCIENCE AND MATH EDUCATION IN URBAN SETTINGS:

McCain supports bonuses for teachers, especially in math and science, in underperforming schools. Obama promises to recruit math and science degree graduates to be teachers and supports programs that pair new teachers with experienced teachers in their field. He will work for a strong science curriculum at all grade levels.
  • Professors Christopher Emdin, Ann Rivet, Felicia Moore, Erica Walker and Alexander Karp are involved in a program, funded by the GE Foundation, to build capacity in math and science at 10 schools in Harlem (contact through Patricia Lamiell, 212-678-3979 or lamiell@tc.columbia.edu).
 URBAN AND MINORITY EDUCATION AND EQUITY: 
  • Edmund W. Gordon, founder and director of the Institute for Urban and Minority Education and professor emeritus of psychology and education at Teachers College, is concerned with the education of low-status populations and issues associated with increasing the number of high academic achieving students who come from African American, Latino and Native American families. His research also includes investigations of teaching and learning experiences that occur out of school as well as in school (comprehensive and supplementary education) and of persons who defy negative predictions of academic success. (Contact Gordon through Patricia Lamiell, 212-678-3979 or lamiell@tc.columbia.edu.)

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION FUNDING, POLICY AND STANDARDS: 
Obama would create federal grants to promote state preschool and infant care programs and promote voluntary, universal pre-school.

  • Sharon Lynn Kagan is a professor of early childhood and family policy and co-director of the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College. An associate dean for policy and director of policy research at Teachers College, Kagan is an expert on public policy related to families and early childhood, as well as teacher and program quality and equity. She also has considerable international experience in the development of early learning standards (sharon.kagan@columbia.edu or at 212-678-8255)
CYBER- AND HOME SCHOOLING:
McCain would allocate federal funds to online schools and courses, tutoring and test preparation.
  • Luis A. Huerta, assistant professor of education, is an expert in school choice reforms and school finance policy, and how school reforms affect equity and quality in schools (lah2013@columbia.edu or 212-678-4199).

COMMUNITY COLLEGES, WORKPLACE DEVELOPMENT: 
  • Thomas Bailey is a professor of economics and education and director of the Institute on Education and the Economy, the Community College Research Center, and the National Center for Postsecondary Research. He is an authority on higher education policy; data-driven college reform at institutional and state levels; education/career transitions; and labor economics. His expert knowledge in community colleges includes: community college missions; persistence, graduation and other educational outcomes; institutional research; the economic value of community college education and degrees; workforce education; and dual enrollment. Contact him at tbailey@tc.edu or 212.678.3091.


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