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Saturday, February 6
East Asia (Simulcast Workshop): How to Read Chinese Paintings
 
10:00am – 1:00pm, Followed by optional field trip
 
What is different about the rendition of space in a Chinese painting? Why is there calligraphy as well as image? Red chops? Learn more about these and other topics from Maxwell Hearn, the Douglas Dillon Curator in the Metropolitan Museum’s Department of Asian Art, author of a best selling book of the same title as the lecture. Designed for art teachers as well as for history, literature, and social studies teachers who would like to introduce the art of China to their students. Instructor: Hearn, the Douglas Dillon Curator, Department of Asian Art Metropolitan Museum of Art. $15.00 for people attending at the Columbia University site (Non-credit/non-degree course). Participants who attend a tour of the Metropolitan galleries of Chinese art at a later date (to be announced) will earn 0.5 CEUs. For other participants, please contact your NCTA office sponsoring the program. Register at www.tc.columbia.edu/i/a/document/11971_eastasiaregistration_empr2.pdf
 
 
Sunday, February 7

Staten Island Alumni Reception
 
2:00pm – 5:00pm

415 Vineyard Avenue, Staten Island
 
 
 
Sunday, February 7
 
Chicago
 
2:30 pm
 
Ambassador Theater
 
Tickets on sale on January 20 in Thorndike 160. Half of the tickets will be sold at 9:30 am and half at 4:30 pm. Tickets are $30 each and one per TC student ID. Cash only. Non-refundable. For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
 
 
Monday & Tuesday, February 8 & 9
 
The Campaign for Educational Equity 5th Annual Symposium
 
7:00am – 6:00pm
 
Gov. Edward Rendell, State of Pennsylvania, Keynote Address, Day 1
 
Russlynn Ali, Assistant Secretary, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Keynote Address, Day 2. Form more information, visit: www.tc.edu/symposium.
 
 
February 9 through February 13

Reading and Writing Project
 
8:00am – 4:00am
 
Milbank Chapel and 177-179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
 
Tuesday, February 9

Harlem Village Academy Information Session
 
4:30pm - 6:00pm
 
179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
This event is open to TC and Columbia students/alumni only! Please visit www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitment for more detailed event information.
 
 
Tuesday, February 9
 
Raising Happy—and Moral—Children: A lecture with Richard Weissbourd
 
6:30pm – 7:30pm
 
Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
These days many of us as parents are very focused on our kids’ happiness and achievements. But this intense focus on happiness and achievement—and the constant praising of kids that goes with it—can imperil the development of kids’ moral qualities. What kinds of achievement pressure are constructive and what kinds are destructive? How can we raise children who are both happy and moral? What are the key moral qualities that we need to develop in kids, and how can we as parents and teachers develop them? Richard Weissbourd, author of The Parents We Mean to Be and lecturer on education at Harvard University, describes how parents and other adults can become more effective moral mentors.
 
 
Tuesday, February 9
 
International Human Rights - A panel discussion with Yvette Christianse, Helen Lieberman, Virginia Setshedi
and Jody Williams
 
6:30pm - 7:30pm

Diana Center Event Oval
 
This year’s Rennert Forum celebrates the life and work of Helen Suzman, the iconic South African leader who devoted her life to the fight against apartheid. Distinguished human rights activists discuss Suzman’s legacy and how her work illuminates today’s struggles for international human rights. Helen Lieberman is founder and Honorary President of Ikamva Labantu (The Future of our Nation), a South African grassroots social development organization; Virginia Magwaza-Setshedi is Programme Manager with the Norwegian People’s Aid and anti-privatization activist; Jody Williams is the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate. Yvette Christianse, Associate Professor of English at Fordham University, will moderate and provide introductory remarks. Co-sponsored by the Dobkin Family Foundation
 
 
Tuesday, February 9
 
Latinos in The US: Assimilation Or Transnationalism? A lecture with Silvia Pedraza
 
Silvia Pedraza and Lara Sung Back use the National Latino Survey data collected in 2006 to assess the extent to which Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and South American immigrants have assimilated or engaged in transnational practices as well as which social characteristics predict these behaviors. They compare various immigrant cohorts: those who arrived in the US between 1958-1973, 1974-1989, and 1990-2005. The results show that the type of migration—as labor migrants, professional migrants, or refugees—makes a difference for these outcomes. Silvia Pedraza is Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her publications include Political and Economic Migrants in America: Cubans and Mexicans; Origins and Destinies: Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity in America, co-edited with Ruben G. Rumbaut; and Political Disaffection in Cuba’s Revolution and Exodus.
 
 
February 9 through March 25
 
Helen Suzman: Fighter for Human Rights

Diana Center
 
Helen Suzman served on South Africa’s Parliament from 1953–1989, and was alone in opposing apartheid during the 13-year period when she was the governing body’s only member of the Progressive Party (1961-1974). This exhibition explores nearly four decades of Suzman’s life and vision through photographs, personal letters, quotations from speeches, and news articles. Suzman was nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Price in recognition of her contribution to the pursuit of justice in South Africa. She received the United Nations Award of the International League for Human Rights in 1978. In 1989, Queen Elizabeth conferred on her an Honorary Dame Commander (Civil Division) of the Order of the British Empire. Suzman died on January 1, 2009, at the age of 91.
 
 
Wednesday, February 10
 
Award of February degrees and certificates. No ceremony.
 
 
Wednesday, February 10
 
OSCP Event
 
8:00am – 12:00pm
 
Cowin Auditorium
 
 
Thursday, February 11
 
White Rights: What Apartheid South Africa Learned From the United States - A lunchtime lecture with Elizabeth Esch
 
12:00pm – 1:00pm

Diana Center
 
Though widely regarded as the most racist regime on earth, the apartheid government in South Africa learned much from policies and practices long extant in the United States. Before apartheid was institutionalized, South African social scientists, educators, and politicians were among the most astute observers of racial segregation and white supremacy in the U.S. Elizabeth Esch, Assistant Professor of History and American Studies at Barnard College, shows how white South Africans studied U.S. history and mimicked its practices—from so-called anti-miscegenation laws to the pass-book and homeland systems—in implementing apartheid. Professor Esch’s work has appeared in Souls: a Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society; Cabinet: a Quarterly Journal of Art and Culture; and Historical Materialism.
 
 
Thursday, February 11
 
Launch of Anand Marri’s social studies curriculum on the national debt
 
3:00pm – 6:00 pm
 
The Peterson Foundation headquarters in NYC, 712 Fifth Avenue at 56th Street
 
 
Thursday, February 11
 
Uncommon Schools Information Session
 
4:30pm - 6:00pm
 
179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
This event is open to TC and Columbia students/alumni only! Please visit www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitment for more detailed event information
 
 
Thursday, February 11
 
Diversity Hip Hop Influences
 
6:00pm - 9:00pm
 
Milbank Chapel
 
A panel with Emdin, Christopher; Hill, Marc; Bridges, Thurman
 
 
Friday, February 12
 
TESOL Apple Lecture
 
12:00pm to 9:00pm
 
Cowin Auditorium; 150-152 Horace Mann
 
 
Friday, February 12
 
NYC Ballet: Swan Lake
 
8:00pm

Lincoln Center
 
For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690. Tickets on sale on January 25 in Thorndike 160. Half of the tickets will be sold at 9:30 am and half at 4:30 pm. Tickets are $12 each and one per TC student ID. Cash only. Non-refundable.
 
 
February 12 & February 13
 
Introduction to Digital Video
 
9:30am - 4:45pm
 
This workshop introduces participants to the creative methods for the integration of digital video in education. Learn how to digitize pre-recorded videos and edit them using Apple’s iMovie. We will look at the surrounding community as a resource. In addition, learn how to research a local historical site and produce a one-minute video that will be exported to Quicktime and burned to a DVD. Instructor: Shawna BuShell; Tuition: $543.00. Available for 1.5 CEU’s. (Non-credit/non-degree course). Register at https://app.applyyourself.com/?id=COL-TCNC
 
 
Saturday, February 13
 
Career Services
 
8:00am – 6:00pm
 
Cowin Auditorium and 138,140, 152 Horace Mann
 
 
Saturday, February 13
 
Literature Review
 
9:30am – 12pm
 
Location TBD
 
This workshop is presented by the Graduate Writing Center. For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
 
 
Monday, February 15
 
Zankel Fellowship Application Deadline
 
For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
 
 
Tuesday, February 16
 
Last day to change points in variable-point courses.
 
 
Tuesday, February 16
 
Lunchtime lecture: Quiet Revolutions: Postcolonial Women’s Writings and Structures of Solidarity
 
12:00pm - 1:00pm
 
Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
 
Since the 1980s, the conventional model for reading postcolonial women’s writings has been to emphasize the prevalence of silence and invisibility, the desire for voice and narrative space, and the use of self-representation as a form of empowerment and transformation. What is often eclipsed is a valuable political ethic based on solidarity and coalition-building among oppressed and marginalized figures. By working across an expansive literary archive, stretching from Mary Prince’s slave narrative to more recent works by Miriama Ba, Bapsi Sidhwa, Edwidge Danticat and Shani Mootoo, Alison Donnell identifies an alternative framework for reading such literature, presenting a new model of feminist criticism rooted in the solidarity of experience and coalitional ethics. Alison Donnell is the author of Twentieth Century Caribbean Literature: Critical Moments in Anglophone Literary and Critical History and a Joint Editor of Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies.
 
 
Tuesday, February 16
 
The Vice President’s Office for Diversity & Community Affairs’ Book Talk Series
 
4:00pm – 5:30pm
 
Milbank Chapel
 
Anna Newmann, Professing to Learn, Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University
 
 
Tuesday-Thursday, February 16-18

Reading and Writing Project
 
8:00am – 4:00pm
 
Private Dining Room; Milbank Chapel; Cowin Auditorium; 177-179 Grace Dodge; First floor, Horace Mann
 
 
Wednesday, February 17
 
Mastering the Student Affairs Conference Career Panel
 
5:30pm - 7:00pm
 
 
 
Wednesday, February 17
 
Where’s My Fit? Career Panel
 
5:30pm - 7:00pm
 
 
 
Thursday, February 18
 
Teachers College Alumni Panel
 
4:00pm - 5:00pm
 
Location TBA
 
 
 
Thursday, February 18
 
Harlem Children’s Zone Information Session
 
4:00pm - 6:30pm
 
140 Horace Mann
 
This event is open to TC and Columbia students/alumni only! Please visit www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitmentfor more detailed event information
 
 
Friday, February 19
 
Doctoral Certification Examination for students not majoring in an area of psychology
 
9:00am -12:00pm & 1:45pm - 4:45pm
 
 
Friday, February 19
 
Lecture: A Nation-building People: American Efforts at International Control without Empire, and the
Consequences
 
10:30am - 11:30am
 
Morningside Campus, 311 Fayerweather Hall
 
Jeremi Suri of University of Wisconsin-Madison lectures, “A Nation-building People: American Efforts at International Control without Empire, and the Consequences” at the Center for International History. For more information email sea2009@columbia.edu or visit www.columbia.edu/cu/cih/c_conferences.htm.
 
 
Friday-Saturday, February 19-20
 
2010 Counseling & Clinical Psychology 27th Annual Winter Roundtable:  “Act Together: The Hope of
Community.”
 
Milbank Chapel; Cowin Auditorium; and Grace Dodge Hall
 
The Winter Roundtable is the longest running continuing professional education program in the United States devoted solely to cultural issues in psychology and education. The Winter Roundtable will continue its tradition of bringing together scholars, practitioners, researchers, social change agents and students interested in the intersections between race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and religious affiliation in psychology and education. The theme of the 2010 conference, “Act Together: The Hope of Community” underscores the Roundtable’s commitment to recognizing the multiple and complex effects of culture and social location in psychological and educational matters. The Winter Roundtable’s legacy in honoring significant and promising research, practice, and training innovations in cultural psychology and education will be continued in the 2010 conference, with the inclusion of five highlighted conference features: The presentation of the 7th Annual Social Justice Action Award, the presentation of the 20th Annual Janet E. Helms Award for Mentoring and Scholarship in Psychology and Education, the Student Scholarship Program, and Pathways to Publication, Pathways to Practice. Details are provided in the links to the left. See www.tc.columbia.edu/centers/roundtable
 
 
Saturday & Sunday, February 20-21
 
TESOL Curriculum and Design Workshop
 
10:00am - 6:00pm
 
This workshop focuses on language curriculum and course design for adult learners. Participants will be introduced to factors in course development such as context, needs, goals and objectives, materials and evaluation, course organization and content conceptualization. They will also explore, discuss, and create resources and materials for their target student population. The workshop will take place in one of the computer labs. Instructor: Carolin Fuchs; Tuition: $543.00; Available for 1 CEU. (Non-credit/non-degree course). Register at: https://app.applyyourself.com/?id=COL-TCNC
 
 
Saturdays, February 20 – 27
 
Publishing on the Web as an Educational Activity
 
9:30am - 4:45pm
 
This inspiring workshop is for educators, administrators and faculty, who wish to design their own interactive Web site  using Dreamweaver for their personal or professional enrichment. Learn how to integrate graphics and photos to high quality Internet pages that incorporate tables, style sheets, Java scripts, web forms and surveys. Participants will also begin to consider various issues that arise when using the web, such how to make WWW sites accessible, and how to address security, privacy and copyright considerations. Instructor: Alyson Vogel; Tuition: $543.00; Available for 1.5 CEU’s. (Non-credit/non-degree course). Register at: https://app.applyyourself.com/?id=COL-TCNC
 
 
Monday, February 22
 
Coffee Hour: Learn by Doing!
 
10:00am - 11:00am
 
Second Floor Salon, Gottesman Libraries
 
Do your eyes glaze over when presented with the details of database searching? Will the newly adopted Cephalonian method thrive or fail? What about using Socrates to teach the library catalog? A more student centered approached to finding full text? Sometimes called experiential learning? And the future of library instruction…?! The Gottesman Libraries is experimenting with more fun, innovative, and effective ways to bring research resources and strategies to the Teachers College classroom. Join us over coffee and danishes to discuss instructional strategies and brainstorm ideas, as we embrace the spirit of progressive education and learn by doing! Please RSVP: www.tc.columbia.edu/calendar/rsvp/rsvp.htm?eventID=7469&eID=28&eType=Center
 
 
Monday, February 22
 
On Dance: Merce Cunningham And His Legacy As A Teacher - A panel discussion with Mary Lisa Burns, Nancy Dalva, Patricia Lent, and Robert Swinston
 
7:00pm - 8:00pm
 
Julius S. Held Auditorium, 304 Barnard Hall
 
“When giving my exercises,” said Merce Cunningham in The Dancer and the Dance, “I take care not to impose a style of any kind. I just hope it appears as natural as possible. . . It’s very important that every day the student has the feeling that he has danced . . . In every class. . .the student should touch the utmost limits.” This panel discussion includes Robert Swinston, Assistant to the Choreographer at the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, and Patricia Lent, Director of Repertory Licensing, and Mary Lisa Burns, Director of Education for the Cunningham Dance Foundation. Mr. Swinston and Ms. Lent are also Trustees of the Merce Cunningham Trust. Moderated by Nancy Dalva, Producer/Writer for the Foundation’s web series “Mondays with Merce,” the discussion will focus on the world-renowned choreographer’s lifelong work as a teacher who both created a technique of modern dance and trained generations of dancers and dance teachers. Information 212.854.2995
 
 
Monday, February 22
 
Doctoral Student Dinner Discussion
 
4:00pm - 6:00pm
 
For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
 
 
Tuesday, February 23
 
Lecture: Writing the Outsider: Perspectives From Spain
 
6:00pm - 7:00pm
 
Ella Weed Room, 2nd Floor Milbank Hall
 
What does it mean for a literary work to write the ‘outsider.’ Can literature authentically capture a voice from elsewhere? Or, by attempting to do just that, does it necessarily corrupt and confuse such a voice? Drawing on the last work of Miguel de Cervantes, The Trials of Persiles and Sigismunda: A Northern Story (1617), Sonia Velazquez, from the department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures at Princeton University, discusses how literature can either deny the speech and voice of the ‘outsider’ or else attempt to open up channels of communication. In particular, she suggests that Cervantes, unlike comparable writers of epic in the period, does not attempt to ‘tame the outsider’; rather, those characters which Cervantes situates as ‘barbarians’ are made intelligible through practices of translation. Sponsored by the Mellon Foundation. Information: 212.854.5321 barnardtranslation@gmail.com
 
 
Tuesday, February 23
 
Tisch Lecture with Visiting Professor Robert Stiegler
 
4:00pm - 8:00pm
 
Location TBD
 
 
Tuesday, February 23
 
Teach For All Information Session
 
4:30pm – 6:00pm
 
140 Horace Mann
 
This event is open to TC and Columbia students/alumni only! Please visit www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitment for more detailed event information
 
 
Wednesday, February 24

Reading and Writing Project
 
8:00am – 4:00pm
 
Milbank Chapel4
 
 
Wednesday, February 24
 
Campaign for Educational Equity Forum: Healthier Students Are Better Learners
 
3:30pm – 5:00pm
 
179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
Featuring the research of Chuck Basch, TC’s Richard March Hoe Professor of Health Education on six major health risks that affect students’ academic performance. (He is trying to get a former TC student, Howard Wechsler, who’s a high-up at the CDC. He also has visions of getting a Big Name – Bill Clinton, Michelle Obama, Bloomberg, Dennis Wolcott. Please RSVP: www.tc.columbia.edu/calendar/rsvp/rsvp.htm?eventID=7476&eID=238&eType=Center
 
 
Wednesday, February 24
 
A Taste of Harlem
 
3:00pm - 5:00pm
 
For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
 
 
Wednesday, February 24
 
Performance & Lecture: Afro-Latino Identity in the Diaspora
 
5:00pm – 8:00pm
 
A Program with Professor Juan Flores (NYU) and the Afro-Latino Forum. The evening’s event will feature an opening presentation, followed by workshops with Forum members on working with youth on these issues, and ending with a cultural performance featuring Afro-Latino music. For more information, contact Regina Cortina at cortina@tc.columbia.edu. Sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Community Affairs.
 
 
Thursday, February 25
 
The Vice President’s Office for Diversity & Community Affairs’ Book Talk Series
 
4:00pm – 5:30pm
 
Milbank Chapel
 
Eleanor Drago- Severson, Leading Adult Learning, Supporting Adult Development in Our School
 
 
Thursday, February 25
 
Lecture: Strangers in Paradise: Religion, Politics and Identity In New Migrant Communities in The US
 
7:00pm – 8:00pm
 
Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall
 
Having served as lead investigator for a team of scholars and activists who undertook a four-year ethnographic project that studied religion among migrants around the San Francisco Bay Area, Lois Ann Lorentzen examines the multiple roles that religion plays for new migrant communities in the United States. By focusing on the experiences of Salvadoran Pentecostals, Vietnamese Theravada Buddhists, Yucatecan Maya, and Chinese Presbyterians, Lorentzen explores the theoretical connections among transnationalism, spiritual journeys, gender crossings, and acculturation. She also offers reflections on how “religion” itself is transformed by the migrant experience.
 
 
Friday, February 26
 
Doctoral Certification Examination (Ed.D./Ph.D.) for students majoring in an area of psychology
 
9:00am – 12pm and 1:45pm - 4:45pm
 
 
Friday, February 26
 
All Ivy Environmental and Sustainable Development Career Fair
 
10:00am - 3:00pm
 
Morningside Campus, Low Memorial Library, The Rotunda, Columbia University
 
To register for this event and learn more detailed event information, please visit  www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitment
 
 
Friday, February 26
 
Human Resources/Organizational Development Career Fair
 
3:00pm - 6:00pm
 
The New School (Arnhold Hall, 2nd floor)
 
To register for this event and learn more detailed event information, please visit www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitment
 
 
Friday & Saturday, February 26-27
 
Career Services 2010 Metro Fair
 
Private Dining Room and 177-179 Grace Dodge Hall
 
8:00am- 6:00pm
 
 
Friday & Saturday, February 26-27
 
Podcasting in Education
 
9:30am – 4:45pm
 
This workshop introduces participants to the creative and practical applications of podcasting in education. Learn how to record and produce your own 1-minute audio and video podcasts. In addition, you will learn how to post your final projects to the Internet and download them onto portable media players. Instructor: Shawna BuShell. Tuition: $543.00. Available for 1.5 CEU’s. (Non-credit/non-degree course). Register at: https://app.applyyourself.com/?id=COL-TCNC
 
 
Saturday, February 27
 
Scholar and Feminist Conference XXXV: Feminism And Climate Change
 
9:00am – 6:00pm
 
Registration in Barnard Hall Lobby
 
How does social exploitation parallel environmental exploitation in regional and global contexts? How can diverse affected groups find common ground? The 2010 Feminism and Climate Change Conference will bring together a wide array of pioneering environmental activists, artists and scholars who have focused on the gender, race and class components of global climate change. Keynote speakers: Majora Carter, environmental justice activist and president of the Majora Carter Group, a “green” economic consulting firm. Joni Seager, scholar and activist in feminist geography and global environmental policy; and Chair, Global Studies Department at Bentley University. For a full list of participants, and to register, please visit: www.barnard.edu/bcrw/scholarandfeminist
 
 
Saturday, February 27
 
Admissions Gates Millennium
 
8:00am – 5:00pm
 
Cowin Auditorium and First floor, Horace Mann
 
 
Saturday, February 27
 
Workshop: Concept Mapping
 
9:30am – 12:00pm
 
Location TBD
 
Presented by the Graduate Writing Center. For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
 
 
Saturday, February 27
 
Black Student Network Fifth Annual Black History Month Gala
 
7:00pm – 2:00am
 
TC Grace Dodge Dining Hall
 
“I Can. I Will. It’s Already Done.” Dinner and Cocktails, All Black Attire. For more information, please contact Althea Jack at x4190 or ajack@tc.columbia.edu. Sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Community Affairs.
 
 
Monday, March 1
 
Last day to submit to the Registrar’s Office formal Master’s essays for May award of degree.
 
 
Monday, March 1
 
University Seminar on Innovation in Education
 
7:00pm - 9:00pm
 
305 Russell Hall
 
Join us for a stimulating evening of new ideas and discussion. The University Seminar on Innovation in Education explores the process of learning in individuals, organizations, and society–throughout the lifespan and via major institutions and is co-chaired by Ronald Gross, who also conducts Gottesman’s Socratic Conversations, and Robert McClintock, TC’s John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg Professor in the Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education. For more information or to RSVP, contact 212-678-3022 or govan@tc.edu.
 
 
Tuesday, March 2
 
ESF Summer Camps Information Session
 
4:30pm - 6:00pm
 
This event is open to TC and Columbia students/alumni only! Please visit www.tc.columbia.edu/careerservices/index.asp?Id=Students&Info=Jobs+%26+Recruitment for more detailed event information
 
 
Wednesday, March 3
 
Casual Conversations
 
12:00pm - 1:30pm
 
GDH Private Dining Room
 
For more information, visit www.tc.edu/studentactivities or 212-678-3690.
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