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Press Room: Opinions

Displaying articles 10 to 20 of 67.

  • TC

    TC's Edmund Gordon: Use of Standardized Testing is "Ineffective, Immoral"

    In an opinion piece on LoHud.com, the March Hoe Professor of Psychology and Education, emeritus, writes that recent testing scandals are evidence of the misuse of standardized test scores to hold students, teachers and schools accountable.
    Published: 4/16/2013

  • CCRC

    CCRC's Scott-Clayton: Number of For-Profit Colleges Is Twice What's Reported

    On the New York Times' Economix blog, Scott-Clayton writes that, counting those that don't receive federal aid, the reported number of for-profit colleges doubles.
    Published: 2/24/2012

  • Aaron Pallas: Teacher Evaluations Not Truly "Rigorous"

    Aaron Pallas: Teacher Evaluations Not Truly "Rigorous"

    Posted first on The Hechinger Report website, the Professor of Sociology and Education writes that in today's parlance, teacher evaluations are incorrectly seen as "rigorous" if they rate teachers as ineffective.
    Published: 2/21/2012

  • Preventing High School Dropouts More Than Pays for Itself

    Preventing High School Dropouts More Than Pays for Itself

    President Obama's proposal to make high school attendance mandatory until age 18 is a step in the right direction, TC's Henry M. Levin and Cecilia E. Rouse at Princeton write in the New York Times, but it wouldn't be enough to meaningfully reduce the dropout rate. Research shows that some of the most promising approaches need to start much earlier -- at preschool age, and they will return two to four times their cost.
    Published: 1/26/2012

  • Henig Asks, Who is Financing Education Reform?

    Henig Asks, Who is Financing Education Reform?

    In his third and final guest blog for Rick Hess in Education Week, TC's Jeff Henig notes that it's getting increasingly difficult to find out who is footing the bill for some education reform and policy groups.
    Published: 7/28/2011

  • TC

    TC's Jeff Henig Says Sophisticated Data Mining Can Help Guide Policy Decisions in Schools

    In his second of three guest blogs this week for Rick Hess's "Straight Up," Henig says that sophisticated analysis of high-quality data can be useful in setting education policy, but only if "other important factors are taken into account."
    Published: 7/26/2011

  • What Do Teachers Want?

    What Do Teachers Want?

    Teachers aren't being heard in education reform policy debates, but they should be, writes Professor Jeff Henig, guest-blogging for Rick Hess on Edweek.org. Reformers should ask teachers "how various reform initiatives bear upon their sense of accomplishment, pride, and long-term commitment to the field," Henig says.
    Published: 7/25/2011

  • American Schools Will Not Hit Proficiency Marks Unless They Attend to Nonschool Factors

    American Schools Will Not Hit Proficiency Marks Unless They Attend to Nonschool Factors

    TC's Jeffrey Henig, with co-author S. Paul Reville, write in Education Week that Americans need to address social factors such as socioeconomic status, concentrations of poverty, and school and residential mobility, if children are going to meet achievement marks set by No Child Left Behind legislation.
    Published: 5/25/2011

  • Bottom-Up Peace

    Bottom-Up Peace

    With Israeli-Palestinian conflict again at stalemate, TC Emeritus Professor Morton Deutsch and current faculty member Peter Coleman argue (in a piece published in The Huffington Post) that the current upheaval in the Mideast offers a critical opportunity for citizens on both sides to push their governments for progress.
    Published: 4/22/2011

  • Time to Bury the Hatchet

    Time to Bury the Hatchet

    In a recent blog on the Huffington Post site, TC's Peter Coleman and co-author Alon Gratch argue that the current upheaval in the Middle East may offer the last, best hope for the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.
    Published: 3/6/2011

  • A Plea for Partisanship in Education

    A Plea for Partisanship in Education

    Writing in Education Week, TC's Amy Stuart Wells argues that while education represents a rare area of consensus between Democrats and Republicans right now, "the most agreed-upon solutions-'"testing, privatization, deregulation, stringent accountability systems, and placement of blame on unions for all that is wrong-'"are doing more harm than good."
    Published: 1/28/2011

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