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O. Roger Anderson Honored

O. Roger Anderson, Professor of Natural Sciences in the Department of Scientific Foundations, was recently awarded the Medal for Outstanding Research by the Palaeontological Society of Japan.

O. Roger Anderson, Professor of Natural Sciences in the Department of Scientific Foundations, was recently awarded the Medal for Outstanding Research by the Palaeontological Society of Japan. The medal is awarded each year to a distinguished scientist chosen by their award committee based on outstanding published research.

Anderson's research is in the area of physiological ecology of radiolaria. Radiolaria are marine protozoa that produce very elaborate glassy skeletons that continuously settle into the sediments of the ocean. They provide evidence of climatic and ecological conditions of the earth over geological time spans. The research Anderson has done is used to clarify the physiology of radiolaria in relation to environmental factors that support their life.

The citation Anderson received from the Palaeontological Society of Japan reads: "You are both an outstanding scientist and a good teacher; This is one of the strongest factors behind your award."

Also, Anderson recently received a letter notifying him of his nomination for inclusion in the forthcoming biographical volume 2000 Outstanding Scientists of the Twentieth Century, published by the International Biographical Centre in Cambridge, England.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

O. Roger Anderson Honored

O. Roger Anderson, Professor of Natural Sciences in the Department of Scientific Foundations, was recently awarded the Medal for Outstanding Research by the Palaeontological Society of Japan. The medal is awarded each year to a distinguished scientist chosen by their award committee based on outstanding published research.

Anderson's research is in the area of physiological ecology of radiolaria. Radiolaria are marine protozoa that produce very elaborate glassy skeletons that continuously settle into the sediments of the ocean. They provide evidence of climatic and ecological conditions of the earth over geological time spans. The research Anderson has done is used to clarify the physiology of radiolaria in relation to environmental factors that support their life.

The citation Anderson received from the Palaeontological Society of Japan reads: "You are both an outstanding scientist and a good teacher; This is one of the strongest factors behind your award."

Also, Anderson recently received a letter notifying him of his nomination for inclusion in the forthcoming biographical volume 2000 Outstanding Scientists of the Twentieth Century, published by the International Biographical Centre in Cambridge, England.

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