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Columbine Changes School's Inner World

In the year that has past since the Columbine High School shootings in Littleton, Colorado, a change has been wrought in the culture of schools from California to Maine. The assault in Colorado did not "kick-start" the revolution that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold envisioned but has compounded parents and students fears about safety and placed new burdens on administrators and teachers.

In the year that has past since the Columbine High School shootings in Littleton, Colorado, a change has been wrought in the culture of schools from California to Maine. The assault in Colorado did not "kick-start" the revolution that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold envisioned but has compounded parents and students fears about safety and placed new burdens on administrators and teachers.

Marla Brassard, a TC psychology professor and school violence expert, said that some students even talk about having contingency plans. "They know what they're going to do, where they're going to dive, under which desk, what their escape routes are. They know you can't blow this stuff off."

The article, entitled "Columbine Changes Schools' Inner World" appeared in the April 14th edition of USA Today .

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to the articles and a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Columbine Changes School's Inner World

In the year that has past since the Columbine High School shootings in Littleton, Colorado, a change has been wrought in the culture of schools from California to Maine. The assault in Colorado did not "kick-start" the revolution that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold envisioned but has compounded parents and students fears about safety and placed new burdens on administrators and teachers.

Marla Brassard, a TC psychology professor and school violence expert, said that some students even talk about having contingency plans. "They know what they're going to do, where they're going to dive, under which desk, what their escape routes are. They know you can't blow this stuff off."

The article, entitled "Columbine Changes Schools' Inner World" appeared in the April 14th edition of USA Today .

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to the articles and a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

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