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Some Push Hard for Software

In the past six years with the wave of the Internet, schools across America have felt the need to equip themselves with technology. However, disparity exists in how many computers schools have for student use.

In the past six years with the wave of the Internet, schools across America have felt the need to equip themselves with technology. However, disparity exists in how many computers schools have for student use. Based on the US Department of Education recommendation, which issues guidelines on important school related matters, most school districts strive for an average of five to seven students per computer.

Robert McClintock, the John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg professor of History and Philosophy in Education, states "When you probe deeper and look school to school in a district, it's depending really on the initiative, priorities and opportunities" of the administrators of the school.

Several officials note that a school's computer supply is not necessarily indicative of the school's technology program. Robert McClintock states that "The ratio of computers to kids is important, but it's by no means the whole of the process."

The article, entitled "Some Push Hard for Software" appeared in the April 19 edition of the Washington Post.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Some Push Hard for Software

In the past six years with the wave of the Internet, schools across America have felt the need to equip themselves with technology. However, disparity exists in how many computers schools have for student use. Based on the US Department of Education recommendation, which issues guidelines on important school related matters, most school districts strive for an average of five to seven students per computer.

Robert McClintock, the John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg professor of History and Philosophy in Education, states "When you probe deeper and look school to school in a district, it's depending really on the initiative, priorities and opportunities" of the administrators of the school.

Several officials note that a school's computer supply is not necessarily indicative of the school's technology program. Robert McClintock states that "The ratio of computers to kids is important, but it's by no means the whole of the process."

The article, entitled "Some Push Hard for Software" appeared in the April 19 edition of the Washington Post.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

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