Teachers Fear Taking Tests to Replace Thrill of Learning | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
Teachers College Newsroom

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Teachers Fear Taking Tests to Replace Thrill of Learning

Teachers in Atlanta Public Schools are concerned that recent emphasis on test scores from the governor will move the focus of learning away from creativity and experimentation to coaching for tests. Gary Natriello comments.

Teachers in Atlanta Public Schools are concerned that recent emphasis on test scores from the governor will move the focus of learning away from creativity and experimentation to coaching for tests. The new curriculum-based tests will be administered yearly from first through eight grade in most academic subjects, high school subject tests would follow eventually. Scores will be compared with state-set standards and used to determine if teachers should receive financial awards or be removed from their schools.

Teachers College Professor Gary Natriello says that politicians, not children, are sometimes the beneficiaries of tests like these. "(Tests) are so seductive because you can turn to the voters and say you're tough, you're accountable, you're insisting on standards. It's pretty easy and it costs almost nothing. Doing that as opposed to really making an investment in education is just much, much easier."

The article, entitled "Teachers Fear Taking Tests to Replace Thrill of Learning " appeared in the March 2nd edition of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published Thursday, Jun. 27, 2002

Teachers Fear Taking Tests to Replace Thrill of Learning

Teachers in Atlanta Public Schools are concerned that recent emphasis on test scores from the governor will move the focus of learning away from creativity and experimentation to coaching for tests. The new curriculum-based tests will be administered yearly from first through eight grade in most academic subjects, high school subject tests would follow eventually. Scores will be compared with state-set standards and used to determine if teachers should receive financial awards or be removed from their schools.

Teachers College Professor Gary Natriello says that politicians, not children, are sometimes the beneficiaries of tests like these. "(Tests) are so seductive because you can turn to the voters and say you're tough, you're accountable, you're insisting on standards. It's pretty easy and it costs almost nothing. Doing that as opposed to really making an investment in education is just much, much easier."

The article, entitled "Teachers Fear Taking Tests to Replace Thrill of Learning " appeared in the March 2nd edition of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends