Helping Students to Learn in the Best Way That They Can | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
Teachers College Newsroom

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Helping Students to Learn in the Best Way That They Can

Increasingly, teachers are finding ways to blend diverse learning styles to make lessons more accessible to all students in a classroom. While some learn best by either visual or auditory means, the ultimate goal is to help student retain the knowledge necessary to be successful on state tests. "One-size-fits-all doesn't work for everybody," said Deanna Kuhn, professor of psychology and education.
Increasingly, teachers are finding ways to blend diverse learning styles to make lessons more accessible to all students in a classroom. While some learn best by either visual or auditory means, the ultimate goal is to help student retain the knowledge necessary to be successful on state tests. "One-size-fits-all doesn't work for everybody," said Deanna Kuhn, professor of psychology and education.

Kuhn suggested that strong systematic data to show what percentage of kids have particular patterns have not been demonstrated in previous research, though "it resonates with teachers." For many districts, understanding various approaches for reaching students is the best way that they can to utilize every aspect of a student's intelligence in the learning process.

The article, entitled "Other Ways to Learn" appeared in the August 15 edition of the New York Journal News.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 9, 2003

Helping Students to Learn in the Best Way That They Can

Increasingly, teachers are finding ways to blend diverse learning styles to make lessons more accessible to all students in a classroom. While some learn best by either visual or auditory means, the ultimate goal is to help student retain the knowledge necessary to be successful on state tests. "One-size-fits-all doesn't work for everybody," said Deanna Kuhn, professor of psychology and education.

Kuhn suggested that strong systematic data to show what percentage of kids have particular patterns have not been demonstrated in previous research, though "it resonates with teachers." For many districts, understanding various approaches for reaching students is the best way that they can to utilize every aspect of a student's intelligence in the learning process.

The article, entitled "Other Ways to Learn" appeared in the August 15 edition of the New York Journal News.
How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends