You've Got Mail | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
Teachers College Newsroom

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

You've Got Mail

“I can't imagine how it would be beneficial to people," said George Bonnano about Mylastemail.com, a service that allows persons to send up to five e-mails in the event of an untimely death.

"I can't imagine how it would be beneficial to people," said George Bonnano about Mylastemail.com, a service that allows persons to send up to five e-mails in the event of an untimely death. The professor of counseling and clinical psychology weighed in on the after-death message service. "It might be very creepy," he said. "There's a certain animated quality we imbue with these things--computers. To some extent it might feel like that person is trying to contact you."

Bonnano, who has spent the past decade studying how people deal with grief, noted that the e-mails might allow people to organize their thoughts about dealing with death, but does not promise that they would grant closure for survivors. "There's a tremendous variability in how people deal with the issue of a death of someone close to them."

The article, entitled "Messages From Grave Go to Kin Via E-mail," appeared in the December 8 edition of the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Published Friday, Dec. 19, 2003

You've Got Mail

"I can't imagine how it would be beneficial to people," said George Bonnano about Mylastemail.com, a service that allows persons to send up to five e-mails in the event of an untimely death. The professor of counseling and clinical psychology weighed in on the after-death message service. "It might be very creepy," he said. "There's a certain animated quality we imbue with these things--computers. To some extent it might feel like that person is trying to contact you."

Bonnano, who has spent the past decade studying how people deal with grief, noted that the e-mails might allow people to organize their thoughts about dealing with death, but does not promise that they would grant closure for survivors. "There's a tremendous variability in how people deal with the issue of a death of someone close to them."

The article, entitled "Messages From Grave Go to Kin Via E-mail," appeared in the December 8 edition of the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends