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Organic Matters

Over the past decade or so, organic has gone from the hippie fringe to the mainstream. There is now a $6 billion-a-year market for organic food. Organic food companies are hot stocks, organic frozen dinners are sold in the grocery stores, Gallo Wine produces organic grapes, and organic tomatoes from Chile are available in the dead of winter.
Over the past decade or so, organic has gone from the hippie fringe to the mainstream. There is now a $6 billion-a-year market for organic food. Organic food companies are hot stocks, organic frozen dinners are sold in the grocery stores, Gallo Wine produces organic grapes, and organic tomatoes from Chile are available in the dead of winter.

In 1997, Joan Dye Gussow, professor emeritus of nutrition and education at Columbia Teachers College and a friend to organic agriculture, wrote an article entitled "Is Organic Food More Nutritious?" Seventy years of studies comparing store-bought certified organic and conventional fruits and vegetables, she said ruefully, have produced no hard proof that certified organic food is more nutritious.

This article, written by Henry Brockman, appeared in the March 13th, 2006 publication of Conscious Choice.

Published Monday, Mar. 13, 2006

Organic Matters

Over the past decade or so, organic has gone from the hippie fringe to the mainstream. There is now a $6 billion-a-year market for organic food. Organic food companies are hot stocks, organic frozen dinners are sold in the grocery stores, Gallo Wine produces organic grapes, and organic tomatoes from Chile are available in the dead of winter.

In 1997, Joan Dye Gussow, professor emeritus of nutrition and education at Columbia Teachers College and a friend to organic agriculture, wrote an article entitled "Is Organic Food More Nutritious?" Seventy years of studies comparing store-bought certified organic and conventional fruits and vegetables, she said ruefully, have produced no hard proof that certified organic food is more nutritious.

This article, written by Henry Brockman, appeared in the March 13th, 2006 publication of Conscious Choice.

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